Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

Re: Pegged tongue and groove joinery

Expand Messages
  • Eric
    Short of measuring extant examples, you can figure some of this out the way that they did, through trial and error. You can apply some of your common sense
    Message 1 of 4 , Dec 13, 2011
      Short of measuring extant examples, you can figure some of this out the way that they did, through trial and error. You can apply some of your common sense and experience.

      I would say that you don't want a peg that is bigger than 1/3 the depth of the tongue and/or groove. Looking at it another way, you probably want the depth of your tongue and groove to be at least 3 times the diameter of your intended pegs.

      And yes, in period, pegs would be necessary. The mechanical fastening of a peg would back up the natural glues and their somewhat less than permanent nature. You can build a six board chest today with no pegs, nails or screws, using only adhesives, but it won't be as durable as one made with pegs, etc.

      Another thing to think about is how they would have created the tongue and groove. Using a plane or chisel? If your tongue and groove is 1/3 the thickness of the boards being joined, how deep is practical using hand tools? As a material, wood hasn't changed mucch in the last 2000 years, so I'm guessing that if you create a decent joint today, it will be pretty close to what what they did back then.

      "Have fun, make stuff"
      Eirikr Mjoksiglandi
      Ashgrove, Barony of Altavia, Caid

      --- In medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com, Scot Eddy <mister_eddy2003@...> wrote:
      >
      > I'm not even sure what all the questions I should be asking are.
      >
      > How big (diameter) should the pegs be?
      > Are pegs necessary?
      >
      > Thanks!
      >
      > Jovian
      >
      >
      >
      > ________________________________
      > From: lorderec <lorderec@...>
      > To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
      > Sent: Tuesday, December 13, 2011 5:11 PM
      > Subject: [MedievalSawdust] Re: Pegged tongue and groove joinery
      >
      >
      >  
      > Not having examined any extant examples, your tenon or tongue needs to have enough 'meat' beyond the peg so the peg doesnt just split out the piece of tongue beyond it. This would depend in part on the size of the peg, but for this sort of box the pegs wouldn't be that big...
      >
      > --- In medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com, Scot Eddy <mister_eddy2003@> wrote:
      > >
      > > I've done a lot of 6 panel chests, but I would like to take a step up in difficulty. Reading here...
      > >
      > > http://www.greydragon.org/library/chests.html
      > >
      > >
      > > I see that 'hutches' or 'Canfield Chests' used pegged tongue and groove joinery. I think I have the basic idea for T&G, but how long/deep should the tongue be if I'm going to peg it?
      > >
      > > Thanks.
      > >
      > > Jovian
      > >
      >
    Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.