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Simple table

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  • larry
    Hey ya I need some help if ya can lend a hand I would greatly appreciate it. I am making a simple table that will break down and fold flat for transit. Similar
    Message 1 of 18 , Nov 29, 2011
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      Hey ya I need some help if ya can lend a hand I would greatly appreciate it. I am making a simple table that will break down and fold flat for transit. Similar to this one linked below
      http://www.greydragon.org/furniture/simpletable.html

      What I am needing help with is I was at GW this last year and noticed that someone had a simple table that was cut out on the side of the table legs in the rampart ram of Gleann Abhann. What I heed to know is how the middle of the table can be constructed so that it can still be slipped together. I wished now that I had stopped and looked at the table a little closer. Anway any help is greatly appreciated.

      In Humble Service.
      Laurence O'Coileain
      moa Jason Wiggins
      House Shadow Legion
    • Chris Wisner
      I made 4 of the tables you have in the link..They are for my group. whats nice the table takes up little space and you can sit 6 at it.
      Message 2 of 18 , Nov 29, 2011
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        I made 4 of the tables you have in the link..They are for my group. whats nice the table takes up little space and you can sit 6 at it.

        On 11/29/2011 9:25 PM, larry wrote:
         

        Hey ya I need some help if ya can lend a hand I would greatly appreciate it. I am making a simple table that will break down and fold flat for transit. Similar to this one linked below
        http://www.greydragon.org/furniture/simpletable.html

        What I am needing help with is I was at GW this last year and noticed that someone had a simple table that was cut out on the side of the table legs in the rampart ram of Gleann Abhann. What I heed to know is how the middle of the table can be constructed so that it can still be slipped together. I wished now that I had stopped and looked at the table a little closer. Anway any help is greatly appreciated.

        In Humble Service.
        Laurence O'Coileain
        moa Jason Wiggins
        House Shadow Legion

      • Dan Baker
        That table was originally in the Known World Handbook many many years ago. I haven t even seen the handbook in 10 years. However There is a French period
        Message 3 of 18 , Nov 30, 2011
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          That table was originally in the Known World Handbook many many years ago.  I haven't even seen the handbook in 10 years.  However There is a French period table the approximates it.  As fas as I know the French table was not an inspiration for the SCA one.  While this table is useful and packs flat, it still takes up a large diameter space.  Usually it gets put underneath everything else, or strapped to the roof.  It is bulky, just flat.  I made one a long time ago and found it impractical.

          If you want a useful more period looking table that takes up a lot less room, I have some plans.  I can send you.  I think there is still pictures in the files area for a table in a box.  It folds into itself and the box is 5 feet by 18 inches by 3 inches approx.  It is a rectangular trestle table and you can make one for the cost of 1 sheet of plywood. and it still seats six. 

          -Capten Rhys

          On Tue, Nov 29, 2011 at 9:31 PM, Chris Wisner <christainblood@...> wrote:
           

          I made 4 of the tables you have in the link..They are for my group. whats nice the table takes up little space and you can sit 6 at it.


          On 11/29/2011 9:25 PM, larry wrote:
           

          Hey ya I need some help if ya can lend a hand I would greatly appreciate it. I am making a simple table that will break down and fold flat for transit. Similar to this one linked below
          http://www.greydragon.org/furniture/simpletable.html

          What I am needing help with is I was at GW this last year and noticed that someone had a simple table that was cut out on the side of the table legs in the rampart ram of Gleann Abhann. What I heed to know is how the middle of the table can be constructed so that it can still be slipped together. I wished now that I had stopped and looked at the table a little closer. Anway any help is greatly appreciated.

          In Humble Service.
          Laurence O'Coileain
          moa Jason Wiggins
          House Shadow Legion


        • Siegfried
          I similarly retired my own table I made like this, many many years ago. One thing that I found, is that if you make this with thinner plywood to save on
          Message 4 of 18 , Nov 30, 2011
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            I similarly retired my own table I made like this, many many years ago.

            One thing that I found, is that if you make this with 'thinner' plywood
            to save on weight ... (ie 1/2") then the whole thing can 'rotate' a fair
            bit. Make it thicker, and it's a brute to carry around.

            ON THE OTHER HAND.

            I've recently had a few people in my Barony take this plan, and size it
            down, by 1/4th. So a 2' diameter circle, with more like 1.5' tall legs.
            You get 4 of these 'small' tables out of a sheet of plywood.

            And they make a really great 'between two chairs' drink table. At that
            size, the pieces pack away well, and it's light to carry around. Even
            if you make it with big-ole 3/4" ply, though it's not needed with the
            smaller user-case anyway.

            Siegfried


            On 11/30/11 1:44 PM, Dan Baker wrote:
            >
            >
            > That table was originally in the Known World Handbook many many years
            > ago. I haven't even seen the handbook in 10 years. However There is a
            > French period table the approximates it. As fas as I know the French
            > table was not an inspiration for the SCA one. While this table is
            > useful and packs flat, it still takes up a large diameter space.
            > Usually it gets put underneath everything else, or strapped to the
            > roof. It is bulky, just flat. I made one a long time ago and found it
            > impractical.
            >
            > If you want a useful more period looking table that takes up a lot less
            > room, I have some plans. I can send you. I think there is still
            > pictures in the files area for a table in a box. It folds into itself
            > and the box is 5 feet by 18 inches by 3 inches approx. It is a
            > rectangular trestle table and you can make one for the cost of 1 sheet
            > of plywood. and it still seats six.
            >
            > -Capten Rhys
            >
            > On Tue, Nov 29, 2011 at 9:31 PM, Chris Wisner
            > <christainblood@... <mailto:christainblood@...>> wrote:
            >
            > __
            >
            >
            > I made 4 of the tables you have in the link..They are for my group.
            > whats nice the table takes up little space and you can sit 6 at it.
            >
            >
            > On 11/29/2011 9:25 PM, larry wrote:
            >>
            >>
            >> Hey ya I need some help if ya can lend a hand I would greatly
            >> appreciate it. I am making a simple table that will break down and
            >> fold flat for transit. Similar to this one linked below
            >> http://www.greydragon.org/furniture/simpletable.html
            >>
            >> What I am needing help with is I was at GW this last year and
            >> noticed that someone had a simple table that was cut out on the
            >> side of the table legs in the rampart ram of Gleann Abhann. What I
            >> heed to know is how the middle of the table can be constructed so
            >> that it can still be slipped together. I wished now that I had
            >> stopped and looked at the table a little closer. Anway any help is
            >> greatly appreciated.
            >>
            >> In Humble Service.
            >> Laurence O'Coileain
            >> moa Jason Wiggins
            >> House Shadow Legion
            >>
            >
            >
            >
            >

            --
            Barun Siegfried Sebastian Faust - Barony of Highland Foorde - Atlantia
            http://hf.atlantia.sca.org/ - http://crossbows.biz/ - http://eliw.com/
          • Colonel
            If you have never seen the Smoke & Fire Company camp furniture plans you might be interested in the folding camp table. The entire table breaks down into a
            Message 5 of 18 , Dec 1, 2011
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              If you have never seen the Smoke & Fire Company camp furniture plans you might be interested in the folding camp table. The entire table breaks down into a carrying case which is actually the table top. You can look at these plans here: http://www.smoke-fire.com/camp-furniture-patterns-1.asp

              Tom

              --- In medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com, "larry" <persimmoncreekoutdoor@...> wrote:
              >
              > Hey ya I need some help if ya can lend a hand I would greatly appreciate it. I am making a simple table that will break down and fold flat for transit. Similar to this one linked below
              > http://www.greydragon.org/furniture/simpletable.html
              >
              > What I am needing help with is I was at GW this last year and noticed that someone had a simple table that was cut out on the side of the table legs in the rampart ram of Gleann Abhann. What I heed to know is how the middle of the table can be constructed so that it can still be slipped together. I wished now that I had stopped and looked at the table a little closer. Anway any help is greatly appreciated.
              >
              > In Humble Service.
              > Laurence O'Coileain
              > moa Jason Wiggins
              > House Shadow Legion
              >
            • Michael Sheldon
              ... I have one of these sets built to those plans. The table is very nice, and quite sturdy. It sees a lot of use. The benches, not so much. It s gotten that I
              Message 6 of 18 , Dec 1, 2011
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                On 12/01/2011 05:21 PM, Colonel wrote:
                > If you have never seen the Smoke& Fire Company camp furniture plans you might be interested in the folding camp table. The entire table breaks down into a carrying case which is actually the table top. You can look at these plans here: http://www.smoke-fire.com/camp-furniture-patterns-1.asp

                I have one of these sets built to those plans.

                The table is very nice, and quite sturdy. It sees a lot of use.

                The benches, not so much. It's gotten that I have forbidden their use
                because of visitors to the camp sitting on the end, causing it to
                immediately fly apart and dump the patron on the ground.


                Mike
              • Vels inn Viggladi
                Alright, as a part of my business I do make reproduction furniture. Not only do I have an interest in generating revenue, but also in raising the standards in
                Message 7 of 18 , Dec 2, 2011
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                  Alright, as a part of my business I do make reproduction furniture. Not only do I have an interest in generating revenue, but also in raising the standards in the SCA and other re-enactment/re-recreation groups. So, gonna share this one-

                  http://collections.vam.ac.uk/item/O109565/table/

                  Is this an easy to build table? You betcha. Is this easy to reverse engineer from these images? Oh, most definitely. Is it "period"...? Uh huh.
                  That link there goes to an image of an early 16th century Italian Dessert Table that is in the V&A collection. If you can cut mortise and tenon joints, you can make this table.

                  There is some suspicion that the inlay was done well after the 16th century, which more than makes it optional in reproduction and suggests the piece was at best a merchant class piece of furniture. The back shows the marks of a completely different carving pattern was attempted on this piece originally.



                  Vels
                   
                  > On 12/01/2011 05:21 PM, Colonel wrote:
                  > > If you have never seen the Smoke& Fire Company camp furniture plans you might be interested in the folding camp table. The entire table breaks down into a carrying case which is actually the table top. You can look at these plans here: http://www.smoke-fire.com/camp-furniture-patterns-1.asp
                  >
                  > I have one of these sets built to those plans.
                  >
                  > The table is very nice, and quite sturdy. It sees a lot of use.
                  >
                  > The benches, not so much. It's gotten that I have forbidden their use
                  > because of visitors to the camp sitting on the end, causing it to
                  > immediately fly apart and dump the patron on the ground.
                  >
                  >
                  > Mike

                • Robert Capozello
                  I ve actually done some research (and built some reproductions of) this table.  Info and a dimensioned drawing can be found here:  
                  Message 8 of 18 , Dec 2, 2011
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                    I've actually done some research (and built some reproductions of) this table.  Info and a dimensioned drawing can be found here:
                     
                     
                    This is a scaled down version of the original, so that it packs well in the trunks of most cars.  You can get two of these tables in a 2'x3'x10" space when they are broken down.
                     
                    -- Marcellus

                    From: Vels inn Viggladi <velsthe1@...>
                    To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
                    Sent: Friday, December 2, 2011 10:47 AM
                    Subject: RE: [MedievalSawdust] Re: Simple table

                     
                    Alright, as a part of my business I do make reproduction furniture. Not only do I have an interest in generating revenue, but also in raising the standards in the SCA and other re-enactment/re-recreation groups. So, gonna share this one-

                    http://collections.vam.ac.uk/item/O109565/table/

                    Is this an easy to build table? You betcha. Is this easy to reverse engineer from these images? Oh, most definitely. Is it "period"...? Uh huh.
                    That link there goes to an image of an early 16th century Italian Dessert Table that is in the V&A collection. If you can cut mortise and tenon joints, you can make this table.

                    There is some suspicion that the inlay was done well after the 16th century, which more than makes it optional in reproduction and suggests the piece was at best a merchant class piece of furniture. The back shows the marks of a completely different carving pattern was attempted on this piece originally.



                    Vels
                  • Dan Baker
                    NICE! I ll have to make a couple of those as gifts. -Capten Rhys
                    Message 9 of 18 , Dec 2, 2011
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                      NICE!  I'll have to make a couple of those as gifts.

                      -Capten Rhys

                      On Fri, Dec 2, 2011 at 9:47 AM, Vels inn Viggladi <velsthe1@...> wrote:
                       

                      Alright, as a part of my business I do make reproduction furniture. Not only do I have an interest in generating revenue, but also in raising the standards in the SCA and other re-enactment/re-recreation groups. So, gonna share this one-

                      http://collections.vam.ac.uk/item/O109565/table/

                      Is this an easy to build table? You betcha. Is this easy to reverse engineer from these images? Oh, most definitely. Is it "period"...? Uh huh.
                      That link there goes to an image of an early 16th century Italian Dessert Table that is in the V&A collection. If you can cut mortise and tenon joints, you can make this table.

                      There is some suspicion that the inlay was done well after the 16th century, which more than makes it optional in reproduction and suggests the piece was at best a merchant class piece of furniture. The back shows the marks of a completely different carving pattern was attempted on this piece originally.



                      Vels
                       
                      > On 12/01/2011 05:21 PM, Colonel wrote:
                      > > If you have never seen the Smoke& Fire Company camp furniture plans you might be interested in the folding camp table. The entire table breaks down into a carrying case which is actually the table top. You can look at these plans here: http://www.smoke-fire.com/camp-furniture-patterns-1.asp
                      >
                      > I have one of these sets built to those plans.
                      >
                      > The table is very nice, and quite sturdy. It sees a lot of use.
                      >
                      > The benches, not so much. It's gotten that I have forbidden their use
                      > because of visitors to the camp sitting on the end, causing it to
                      > immediately fly apart and dump the patron on the ground.
                      >
                      >
                      > Mike


                    • Jim Looper
                      I m working on one of those. Well, it is built, I am still painting the top and bottom of the table. One side will have four different game boards on it so you
                      Message 10 of 18 , Dec 2, 2011
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                        I'm working on one of those. Well, it is built, I am still painting the top and bottom of the table. One side will have four different game boards on it so you can play games in camp, the other will have my household badge on it.

                        Lucien

                        Don't blink, you'll miss my flash of brilliance!


                        From: "Vels inn Viggladi" <velsthe1@...>
                        To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
                        Sent: Friday, December 2, 2011 10:47:45 AM
                        Subject: RE: [MedievalSawdust] Re: Simple table

                        Alright, as a part of my business I do make reproduction furniture. Not only do I have an interest in generating revenue, but also in raising the standards in the SCA and other re-enactment/re-recreation groups. So, gonna share this one-

                        http://collections.vam.ac.uk/item/O109565/table/

                        Is this an easy to build table? You betcha. Is this easy to reverse engineer from these images? Oh, most definitely. Is it "period"...? Uh huh.
                        That link there goes to an image of an early 16th century Italian Dessert Table that is in the V&A collection. If you can cut mortise and tenon joints, you can make this table.

                        There is some suspicion that the inlay was done well after the 16th century, which more than makes it optional in reproduction and suggests the piece was at best a merchant class piece of furniture. The back shows the marks of a completely different carving pattern was attempted on this piece originally.



                        Vels
                         
                        > On 12/01/2011 05:21 PM, Colonel wrote:
                        > > If you have never seen the Smoke& Fire Company camp furniture plans you might be interested in the folding camp table. The entire table breaks down into a carrying case which is actually the table top. You can look at these plans here: http://www.smoke-fire.com/camp-furniture-patterns-1.asp
                        >
                        > I have one of these sets built to those plans.
                        >
                        > The table is very nice, and quite sturdy. It sees a lot of use.
                        >
                        > The benches, not so much. It's gotten that I have forbidden their use
                        > because of visitors to the camp sitting on the end, causing it to
                        > immediately fly apart and dump the patron on the ground.
                        >
                        >
                        > Mike

                      • Jim Looper
                        Where did you find the hinges from? Lucien Don t blink, you ll miss my flash of brilliance! ... From: Robert Capozello To:
                        Message 11 of 18 , Dec 2, 2011
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                          Where did you find the hinges from?

                          Lucien

                          Don't blink, you'll miss my flash of brilliance!


                          From: "Robert Capozello" <afpopa@...>
                          To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
                          Sent: Friday, December 2, 2011 10:59:10 AM
                          Subject: Re: [MedievalSawdust] Re: Simple table

                          I've actually done some research (and built some reproductions of) this table.  Info and a dimensioned drawing can be found here:
                           
                           
                          This is a scaled down version of the original, so that it packs well in the trunks of most cars.  You can get two of these tables in a 2'x3'x10" space when they are broken down.
                           
                          -- Marcellus

                          From: Vels inn Viggladi <velsthe1@...>
                          To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
                          Sent: Friday, December 2, 2011 10:47 AM
                          Subject: RE: [MedievalSawdust] Re: Simple table

                           
                          Alright, as a part of my business I do make reproduction furniture. Not only do I have an interest in generating revenue, but also in raising the standards in the SCA and other re-enactment/re-recreation groups. So, gonna share this one-

                          http://collections.vam.ac.uk/item/O109565/table/

                          Is this an easy to build table? You betcha. Is this easy to reverse engineer from these images? Oh, most definitely. Is it "period"...? Uh huh.
                          That link there goes to an image of an early 16th century Italian Dessert Table that is in the V&A collection. If you can cut mortise and tenon joints, you can make this table.

                          There is some suspicion that the inlay was done well after the 16th century, which more than makes it optional in reproduction and suggests the piece was at best a merchant class piece of furniture. The back shows the marks of a completely different carving pattern was attempted on this piece originally.



                          Vels
                        • Robert Capozello
                          http://www.vandykes.com/bk-iron-3butterfly-hinge/p/703021/   -- Marcellus ... http://www.vandykes.com/bk-iron-3butterfly-hinge/p/703021/ -- Marcellus From:
                          Message 12 of 18 , Dec 2, 2011
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                            -- Marcellus

                            From: Jim Looper <jimlooper@...>
                            To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
                            Sent: Friday, December 2, 2011 11:20 AM
                            Subject: Re: [MedievalSawdust] Re: Simple table

                             
                            Where did you find the hinges from?
                            Lucien
                            Don't blink, you'll miss my flash of brilliance!

                            From: "Robert Capozello" <afpopa@...>
                            To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
                            Sent: Friday, December 2, 2011 10:59:10 AM
                            Subject: Re: [MedievalSawdust] Re: Simple table

                            I've actually done some research (and built some reproductions of) this table.  Info and a dimensioned drawing can be found here:
                             
                            http://www.belfebe.com/marcellus/Table/Table.htm
                             
                            This is a scaled down version of the original, so that it packs well in the trunks of most cars.  You can get two of these tables in a 2'x3'x10" space when they are broken down.
                             
                            -- Marcellus
                          • powell.sean@comcast.net
                            Working entirely from my broken and rusty memory wasn t there a similar folding table on the Mary Rose? That would be comfortably mid 16th cent. Sean ... From:
                            Message 13 of 18 , Dec 2, 2011
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                              Working entirely from my broken and rusty memory wasn't there a similar folding table on the Mary Rose? That would be comfortably mid 16th cent.

                               

                              Sean


                              From: "Vels inn Viggladi" <velsthe1@...>
                              To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
                              Sent: Friday, December 2, 2011 10:47:45 AM
                              Subject: RE: [MedievalSawdust] Re: Simple table



                              Alright, as a part of my business I do make reproduction furniture. Not only do I have an interest in generating revenue, but also in raising the standards in the SCA and other re-enactment/re-recreation groups. So, gonna share this one-

                              http://collections.vam.ac.uk/item/O109565/table/

                              Is this an easy to build table? You betcha. Is this easy to reverse engineer from these images? Oh, most definitely. Is it "period"...? Uh huh.
                              That link there goes to an image of an early 16th century Italian Dessert Table that is in the V&A collection. If you can cut mortise and tenon joints, you can make this table.

                              There is some suspicion that the inlay was done well after the 16th century, which more than makes it optional in reproduction and suggests the piece was at best a merchant class piece of furniture. The back shows the marks of a completely different carving pattern was attempted on this piece originally.



                              Vels
                               
                            • Robert Capozello
                              You are correct.    http://www.belfebe.com/marcellus/Table/Mary-Rose.jpg   If I remember correctly, there were actually a set of four of them, and they used
                              Message 14 of 18 , Dec 2, 2011
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                                You are correct. 
                                 
                                 
                                If I remember correctly, there were actually a set of four of them, and they used leather strapping instead of chain to set the width/height.
                                 
                                -- Marcellus

                                From: "powell.sean@..." <powell.sean@...>
                                To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
                                Sent: Friday, December 2, 2011 11:42 AM
                                Subject: Re: [MedievalSawdust] Re: Simple table

                                 
                                Working entirely from my broken and rusty memory wasn't there a similar folding table on the Mary Rose? That would be comfortably mid 16th cent.
                                 
                                Sean

                                From: "Vels inn Viggladi" <velsthe1@...>
                                To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
                                Sent: Friday, December 2, 2011 10:47:45 AM
                                Subject: RE: [MedievalSawdust] Re: Simple table



                                Alright, as a part of my business I do make reproduction furniture. Not only do I have an interest in generating revenue, but also in raising the standards in the SCA and other re-enactment/re-recreation groups. So, gonna share this one-

                                http://collections.vam.ac.uk/item/O109565/table/

                                Is this an easy to build table? You betcha. Is this easy to reverse engineer from these images? Oh, most definitely. Is it "period"...? Uh huh.
                                That link there goes to an image of an early 16th century Italian Dessert Table that is in the V&A collection. If you can cut mortise and tenon joints, you can make this table.

                                There is some suspicion that the inlay was done well after the 16th century, which more than makes it optional in reproduction and suggests the piece was at best a merchant class piece of furniture. The back shows the marks of a completely different carving pattern was attempted on this piece originally.



                                Vels
                                 


                              • AlbionWood
                                Nice job, Marcellus; the walnut version is particularly nice. In your notes, you mention cupping of the walnut planks after planing them. Before suggesting
                                Message 15 of 18 , Dec 2, 2011
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                                  Nice job, Marcellus; the walnut version is particularly nice.

                                  In your notes, you mention cupping of the walnut planks after planing
                                  them. Before suggesting solutions, let me ask a couple of questions:

                                  1. When you planed the boards down, did you take equal amounts off each
                                  face, or plane mostly from one side?

                                  2. Did you "breadboard" the ends, as was apparently done on the original?

                                  Wood always moves in response to humidity changes, so some degree of
                                  cupping is inevitable in wide planks that are transported from indoors
                                  to outdoors and subjected to wide climate variations. This is minimized
                                  in the following ways:

                                  - Using quartersawn lumber, which tends not to cup when humidity changes
                                  - Using thicker planks, which react more slowly to humidity changes
                                  - Breadboarding the ends, which slows down moisture movement and
                                  structurally resists cupping
                                  - Battening the underside, which structurally resists cupping (but must
                                  be done in such a way as to allow lateral movement)
                                  - Applying a moisture barrier (finish), which slows down the rate of
                                  moisture transfer (but not to zero!)

                                  If I were making one of these Italian tables, I'd do all of these.

                                  Cheers,
                                  Tim

                                  On 12/2/2011 7:59 AM, Robert Capozello wrote:
                                  >
                                  >
                                  > I've actually done some research (and built some reproductions of) this
                                  > table. Info and a dimensioned drawing can be found here:
                                  > http://www.belfebe.com/marcellus/Table/Table.htm
                                  > This is a scaled down version of the original, so that it packs well in
                                  > the trunks of most cars. You can get two of these tables in a 2'x3'x10"
                                  > space when they are broken down.
                                  > -- Marcellus
                                  >
                                • Robert Capozello
                                  Tim:   Thanks!   Yes, I took equal amounts from both sides.  No, I did not breadboard the ends, and I should have.  That would have dealt w/ the cupping
                                  Message 16 of 18 , Dec 2, 2011
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                                    Tim:
                                     
                                    Thanks!
                                     
                                    Yes, I took equal amounts from both sides.  No, I did not breadboard the ends, and I should have.  That would have dealt w/ the cupping problem nicely.  I did apply finish, but the boards had sat and already started to cup by the time I got to it (the project was interrupted, as always seems to happen ;-).  Not sure if going back and breadboarding will fix the issue or not.  Can't hurt to try at this point.
                                     
                                    -- Marcellus

                                    From: AlbionWood <albionwood@...>
                                    To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
                                    Sent: Friday, December 2, 2011 2:10 PM
                                    Subject: Re: [MedievalSawdust] Re: Simple table

                                     
                                    Nice job, Marcellus; the walnut version is particularly nice.

                                    In your notes, you mention cupping of the walnut planks after planing
                                    them. Before suggesting solutions, let me ask a couple of questions:

                                    1. When you planed the boards down, did you take equal amounts off each
                                    face, or plane mostly from one side?

                                    2. Did you "breadboard" the ends, as was apparently done on the original?

                                    Wood always moves in response to humidity changes, so some degree of
                                    cupping is inevitable in wide planks that are transported from indoors
                                    to outdoors and subjected to wide climate variations. This is minimized
                                    in the following ways:

                                    - Using quartersawn lumber, which tends not to cup when humidity changes
                                    - Using thicker planks, which react more slowly to humidity changes
                                    - Breadboarding the ends, which slows down moisture movement and
                                    structurally resists cupping
                                    - Battening the underside, which structurally resists cupping (but must
                                    be done in such a way as to allow lateral movement)
                                    - Applying a moisture barrier (finish), which slows down the rate of
                                    moisture transfer (but not to zero!)

                                    If I were making one of these Italian tables, I'd do all of these.

                                    Cheers,
                                    Tim

                                    On 12/2/2011 7:59 AM, Robert Capozello wrote:
                                    >
                                    >
                                    > I've actually done some research (and built some reproductions of) this
                                    > table. Info and a dimensioned drawing can be found here:
                                    > http://www.belfebe.com/marcellus/Table/Table.htm
                                    > This is a scaled down version of the original, so that it packs well in
                                    > the trunks of most cars. You can get two of these tables in a 2'x3'x10"
                                    > space when they are broken down.
                                    > -- Marcellus
                                    >


                                  • AlbionWood
                                    Marcellus, If you do go back and breadboard the ends (which is probably a good idea) - you can probably flatten the boards by reversing the cup. Lay some
                                    Message 17 of 18 , Dec 2, 2011
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                                      Marcellus,

                                      If you do go back and breadboard the ends (which is probably a good
                                      idea) - you can probably flatten the boards by reversing the cup. Lay
                                      some plastic over your bench, then spread moist (not wet) towels over
                                      the plastic, then lay the boards concave-side down on the towels.
                                      Depending on how they were finished, this may cause them to flatten out
                                      as the concave side swells. If that happens, immediately breadboard the
                                      ends.

                                      If you finished with oil, this will probably work. If you applied a
                                      varnish or other film-finish, it probably won't, at least not quickly.
                                      (And if you used shellac, it might discolor the entire finish!) In that
                                      case you might try sanding off the finish from one side, to allow
                                      moisture movement either into or out of the wood. Which side you sand
                                      will depend on your shop conditions. If you are in a heated shop in an
                                      area with cold dry winters, the humidity is probably pretty low, so you
                                      would sand the convex side (so the wood dries and reverses the cup). If
                                      it's humid in your shop, sand the concave side.

                                      Good luck!

                                      Tim


                                      On 12/2/2011 11:50 AM, Robert Capozello wrote:
                                      >
                                      >
                                      > Tim:
                                      > Thanks!
                                      > Yes, I took equal amounts from both sides. No, I did not breadboard the
                                      > ends, and I should have. That would have dealt w/ the cupping problem
                                      > nicely. I did apply finish, but the boards had sat and already started
                                      > to cup by the time I got to it (the project wasinterrupted, as always
                                      > seems to happen ;-). Not sure if going back and breadboarding will fix
                                      > the issue or not. Can't hurt to try at this point.
                                      > -- Marcellus
                                      >
                                      > *From:* AlbionWood <albionwood@...>
                                      > *To:* medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
                                      > *Sent:* Friday, December 2, 2011 2:10 PM
                                      > *Subject:* Re: [MedievalSawdust] Re: Simple table
                                      >
                                      > Nice job, Marcellus; the walnut version is particularly nice.
                                      >
                                      > In your notes, you mention cupping of the walnut planks after planing
                                      > them. Before suggesting solutions, let me ask a couple of questions:
                                      >
                                      > 1. When you planed the boards down, did you take equal amounts off each
                                      > face, or plane mostly from one side?
                                      >
                                      > 2. Did you "breadboard" the ends, as was apparently done on the
                                      > original?
                                      >
                                      > Wood always moves in response to humidity changes, so some degree of
                                      > cupping is inevitable in wide planks that are transported from indoors
                                      > to outdoors and subjected to wide climate variations. This is minimized
                                      > in the following ways:
                                      >
                                      > - Using quartersawn lumber, which tends not to cup when humidity changes
                                      > - Using thicker planks, which react more slowly to humidity changes
                                      > - Breadboarding the ends, which slows down moisture movement and
                                      > structurally resists cupping
                                      > - Battening the underside, which structurally resists cupping (but must
                                      > be done in such a way as to allow lateral movement)
                                      > - Applying a moisture barrier (finish), which slows down the rate of
                                      > moisture transfer (but not to zero!)
                                      >
                                      > If I were making one of these Italian tables, I'd do all of these.
                                      >
                                      > Cheers,
                                      > Tim
                                      >
                                      > On 12/2/2011 7:59 AM, Robert Capozello wrote:
                                      > >
                                      > >
                                      > > I've actually done some research (and built some reproductions
                                      > of) this
                                      > > table. Info and a dimensioned drawing can be found here:
                                      > > http://www.belfebe.com/marcellus/Table/Table.htm
                                      > > This is a scaled down version of the original, so that it packs
                                      > well in
                                      > > the trunks of most cars. You can get two of these tables in a
                                      > 2'x3'x10"
                                      > > space when they are broken down.
                                      > > -- Marcellus
                                      > >
                                      >
                                      >
                                      >
                                      >
                                      >
                                    • stolarz_fw
                                      larry, i am stolarz (steve from little rock) i assume you are talking about the table the royals use with the thrones. these tables are still constructed with
                                      Message 18 of 18 , Dec 3, 2011
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                                        larry, i am stolarz (steve from little rock) i assume you are talking about the table the royals use with the thrones. these tables are still constructed with the half lap in the middle. make your center notches then cut the legs to any shape you wish, leaving enough material in the middle to support the table. i have used this design for the baronies of small gray bear and iron mountain as well as other small round tables, i owe one to froggie. you can see photos on my facebook page,
                                        https://www.facebook.com/pages/Stolarz-fine-woodworking/192485694113810

                                        good luck and contact me if you have more questions


                                        --- In medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com, "larry" <persimmoncreekoutdoor@...> wrote:
                                        >
                                        > Hey ya I need some help if ya can lend a hand I would greatly appreciate it. I am making a simple table that will break down and fold flat for transit. Similar to this one linked below
                                        > http://www.greydragon.org/furniture/simpletable.html
                                        >
                                        > What I am needing help with is I was at GW this last year and noticed that someone had a simple table that was cut out on the side of the table legs in the rampart ram of Gleann Abhann. What I heed to know is how the middle of the table can be constructed so that it can still be slipped together. I wished now that I had stopped and looked at the table a little closer. Anway any help is greatly appreciated.
                                        >
                                        > In Humble Service.
                                        > Laurence O'Coileain
                                        > moa Jason Wiggins
                                        > House Shadow Legion
                                        >
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