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Re: Building a settle

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  • Pamela
    At the bottom of the House Greydragon article is a reference link to Tom Rettie s Home Page . Unfortunately the link is bad but with a bit of futzing I got
    Message 1 of 11 , Nov 27, 2011
      At the bottom of the House Greydragon article is a reference link to 'Tom Rettie's Home Page'. Unfortunately the link is bad but with a bit of futzing I got to the page here:

      http://www.bloodandsawdust.com/Blood_and_Sawdust/Blood_and_Sawdust_Home_Page.html

      Enjoy,

      Brigit

      --- In medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com, Scot Eddy <mister_eddy2003@...> wrote:
      >
      > I've been meaning to build a settle for awhile, but I've never gotten around to it. I finally decided to get started. I'm currently building a test piece out of plywood so I can get the kinks worked out. Here is the piece I'm basing mine on....
      >
      > http://www.greydragon.org/library/flip-back-bench.html
      >
      >
      > The 2 pics at the top of the article. I'll keep ya'll up to date on the progress.
      >
      > Grace and Peace,
      >
      > Jovian
      >
    • Chris
      I like these seats and would like to build one myself. Here s a website with a lot of great resource info on them:
      Message 2 of 11 , Nov 28, 2011
        I like these seats and would like to build one myself. Here's a website with a lot of great resource info on them:

        http://thomasguild.blogspot.com/search/label/strycsitten

        Chris


        --- In medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com, Scot Eddy <mister_eddy2003@...> wrote:
        >
        > I've been meaning to build a settle for awhile, but I've never gotten around to it. I finally decided to get started. I'm currently building a test piece out of plywood so I can get the kinks worked out. Here is the piece I'm basing mine on....
        >
        > http://www.greydragon.org/library/flip-back-bench.html
        >
        >
        > The 2 pics at the top of the article. I'll keep ya'll up to date on the progress.
        >
        > Grace and Peace,
        >
        > Jovian
        >
      • Scot Eddy
        That s a great website! Thanks! Grace and Peace, Jovian ________________________________ From: Chris To:
        Message 3 of 11 , Nov 28, 2011
          That's a great website! Thanks!

          Grace and Peace,

          Jovian


          From: Chris <igelkottinus@...>
          To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: Monday, November 28, 2011 9:23 AM
          Subject: [MedievalSawdust] Re: Building a settle

           
          I like these seats and would like to build one myself. Here's a website with a lot of great resource info on them:

          http://thomasguild.blogspot.com/search/label/strycsitten

          Chris


          --- In medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com, Scot Eddy <mister_eddy2003@...> wrote:
          >
          > I've been meaning to build a settle for awhile, but I've never gotten around to it. I finally decided to get started. I'm currently building a test piece out of plywood so I can get the kinks worked out. Here is the piece I'm basing mine on....
          >
          > http://www.greydragon.org/library/flip-back-bench.html
          >
          >
          > The 2 pics at the top of the article. I'll keep ya'll up to date on the progress.
          >
          > Grace and Peace,
          >
          > Jovian
          >



        • gloerke
          Did you attach a photo to this mail? I am not able to view it, and I would very much like to see your finished German type strycsitten (or Sidelbank ).
          Message 4 of 11 , Nov 28, 2011
            Did you attach a photo to this mail? I am not able to view it, and I would very much like to see your finished German type 'strycsitten' (or 'Sidelbank').

            Marijn
            http://thomasguild.blogspot.com

            --- In medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com, <maf@...> wrote:
            >
            > I love that picture, I built one few years back to house my feast gear. It works great, you’d be surprised how much you can stuff in one of those.
            >
            > Enter album name here
            > VIEW SLIDE SHOW DOWNLOAD ALL
            >
            > This album has 1 photo and will be available on SkyDrive until 24/02/2012.
            >
            >
            >
            > From: Scot Eddy
            > Sent: Saturday, November 26, 2011 6:19 PM
            > To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
            > Subject: [MedievalSawdust] Building a settle
            >
            >
            >
            > I've been meaning to build a settle for awhile, but I've never gotten around to it. I finally decided to get started. I'm currently building a test piece out of plywood so I can get the kinks worked out. Here is the piece I'm basing mine on....
            >
            > http://www.greydragon.org/library/flip-back-bench.html
            >
            >
            > The 2 pics at the top of the article. I'll keep ya'll up to date on the progress.
            >
            > Grace and Peace,
            >
            > Jovian
            >
          • AlbionWood
            Vels - I have to disagree in part, with the assertion that reliquaries were always built with high-class joinery/skill. In fact most of the small wooden boxes
            Message 5 of 11 , Nov 28, 2011
              Vels - I have to disagree in part, with the assertion that reliquaries
              were always built with high-class joinery/skill. In fact most of the
              small wooden boxes I've seen in museums, including some that were
              definitely reliquaries, were simply nailed together with butt joints;
              the joinery is practically nonexistent. Part of the reason is that such
              boxes were nearly always either leather-covered, or gessoed and painted
              (or, more rarely, covered with silver sheet, as you suggest). Either
              way, the joinery becomes invisible and irrelevant.

              I do concur that this particular specimen probably has been rebuilt,
              perhaps with elements from other coffers, and/or has lost some of its
              original decoration. If the roundels are original, then I suggest it
              was almost undoubtedly originally leather-bound, as I have seen two or
              three similarly decorated leather-covered coffers. I also agree with
              you, those double-canopy elements are not pilgrim badges.

              So my guess is that this coffer was taken apart and stripped of its
              leather covering (or possibly paint/gesso), sometime in its postmedieval
              history (most likely in the 19th c when the object was "discovered" -
              happened a lot in that era). No doubt the leather was worn and
              unattractive, perhaps moldy and tattered, etc. The decorative scheme
              may have been rearranged at the same time, or at some other point in its
              history. (To me the roundels look 13th or early 14th c, the
              double-arched "badges" look later.) Again, this is something that was
              done a lot in the late 19th and early 20th century; though, it should be
              noted, it was also done in the Middle Ages as well.

              Cheers,
              Tim



              On 11/27/2011 9:52 AM, Vels inn Viggladi wrote:
              >
              >
              >
              > I don't think those are pilgrim's badges, though I do believe the whole
              > piece is "recycled". Look at the lid, there are nail holes apart from
              > any elements currently affixed. They have some uniformity, but do not
              > match to the spacing on any part that is currently attached there.
              > I'd venture that almost everything we see there was originally part of a
              > larger reliquary that was dropped or damaged in some way to require a
              > significant rebuild.
              >
              > The tin alloy canopies appear to be hollow casts or stamps. The metal
              > decorations are of the type that would have been mounted to a clad
              > reliquary, probably silver. So, at some point either the box was damaged
              > and someone needed to repair the reliquary to continue to host the
              > remains, or someone decided to remove the silver sheet... regardless of
              > why, the wood substrate was damaged and they rebuilt the vessel with
              > whatever means they had, without the silver plating.
              > Reliquaries were never a thing that people scrimpted when having them
              > made. This case here is done with "middle class" techniques and minimal
              > skill.
              > Another assumption: whoever ordered the reliquary rebuilt felt it was
              > more important to retain the "hallowed" original materials than it was
              > to rebuild to the typically opulent quality found in such pieces.
              >
              > I will give them points for disguising the latch mechanism, however.
              > Very subtle.
              >
              >
              >
              > Vels
              >
            • Vels inn Viggladi
              Perhaps I should have gone further with detailing the scrimping and middle class techniques . I didn t mean to suggest that there is always high-class
              Message 6 of 11 , Nov 29, 2011
                Perhaps I should have gone further with detailing the "scrimping" and "middle class techniques".
                I didn't mean to suggest that there is always high-class joinery involved in wooden reliquaries. Honestly I have been more than surprised at the joinery that has been found on such pieces as it goes beyond nailed butt joints. The joinery was never a thing that concerned me.
                The bent nails on the outside of the case, twisted wire hinges, and especially the exposed wood more bespoke the lesser quality in the construction than any other element. The marks on the wood that appear to be either brush strokes or marks from a toothed blade really seem to point to there having been another layer of material between the wood and the cast pieces originally.
                As you say, with pieces like this we typically find leather, gesso (and paint), silver or tin plating, and possibly over any of these metal leaf or other decoration, which makes the joinery invisible and irrelevant.
                It's that lack that I refer to when I say "scrimping". These objects were, and in many places remain, highly celebrated items. For all we in the post-Reformation world may consider visual spectacle being separate from everlasting importance, the opposite was more the case in the pre-Modern Era. And even then, putting all the bells and whistles on a product someone wishes us to buy is part of the marketing ploy.
                The fact that they took the time to carefully rebuild the latch mechanism to be functional, I think, suggests that the rebuild was prior to the 19th century, or at least to a point when the reliquary was still "in use" as a religious item.


                Vels

                > From: albionwood@...
                >
                > Vels - I have to disagree in part, with the assertion that reliquaries
                > were always built with high-class joinery/skill. In fact most of the
                > small wooden boxes I've seen in museums, including some that were
                > definitely reliquaries, were simply nailed together with butt joints;
                > the joinery is practically nonexistent. Part of the reason is that such
                > boxes were nearly always either leather-covered, or gessoed and painted
                > (or, more rarely, covered with silver sheet, as you suggest). Either
                > way, the joinery becomes invisible and irrelevant.
                >
                > I do concur that this particular specimen probably has been rebuilt,
                > perhaps with elements from other coffers, and/or has lost some of its
                > original decoration. If the roundels are original, then I suggest it
                > was almost undoubtedly originally leather-bound, as I have seen two or
                > three similarly decorated leather-covered coffers. I also agree with
                > you, those double-canopy elements are not pilgrim badges.
                >
                > So my guess is that this coffer was taken apart and stripped of its
                > leather covering (or possibly paint/gesso), sometime in its postmedieval
                > history (most likely in the 19th c when the object was "discovered" -
                > happened a lot in that era). No doubt the leather was worn and
                > unattractive, perhaps moldy and tattered, etc. The decorative scheme
                > may have been rearranged at the same time, or at some other point in its
                > history. (To me the roundels look 13th or early 14th c, the
                > double-arched "badges" look later.) Again, this is something that was
                > done a lot in the late 19th and early 20th century; though, it should be
                > noted, it was also done in the Middle Ages as well.
                >
                > Cheers,
                > Tim

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