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Re: [MedievalSawdust] book - Treasure Chests

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  • Alex Flinsch
    ... It must be too early in the morning & not enough coffee -- I read that as Gravy Peas and Turkey , and thought that sounded like a good breakfast.
    Message 1 of 19 , Nov 27 3:46 AM

      On Nov 24, 2011, at 3:15 AM, Scot Eddy wrote:



      Sorry, I sent the email without checking that first. Here is the tinyURL...


      Grace and Peace and Turkey,

      Jovian Skleros


      From: Michael Sheldon <msheldon@...>
      To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com 
      Sent: Thursday, November 24, 2011 12:25 AM
      Subject: Re: [MedievalSawdust] book - Treasure Chests

      Can you provide a specific link? Searching on Treasure Chests on Amazon 
      returns *hundreds* of results.

      Mike Sheldon

      On 11/23/2011 07:14 PM, Scot Eddy wrote:
      >
      >
      > Ran across this on Amazon. Does anyone have it? Is it any good?
      >
      > Grace and Peace and Turkey,
      >


      It must be too early in the morning & not enough coffee -- I read that as "Gravy Peas and Turkey", and thought that sounded like a good breakfast.


    • Ralph
      Coming a little late to the discussion I have one of the OneWay steady s. It really too big for small items like bobbins, hair-sticks, etc. Some of the
      Message 2 of 19 , Nov 27 8:37 AM
        Coming a little late to the discussion

        I have one of the OneWay steady's. It really too big for small items like bobbins, hair-sticks, etc. Some of the home-brew spindle steadys might work, but the one I would suggest is a "String Steady"

        That you are doing with this is using some string or thread to provide the steady pressure.

        A friend, that makes a lot of finials uses a very special tail-stock. It's a Jacob's chuck on a live center, with a retaining bolt treaded into the back of the Morse Taper. How you use it is, put the tail of the spindle into the Jacobs chuck and tighten down the tail-stock, then tighten the retaining bolt (obviously you need a hollow tail-stock to do this). I picked mine up from Penn State Industries, but it is also available from places like MSC-Direct.

        When you get your spindle down to the point where it starts flexing, reduce the tail-stock pressure and actually apply a SLIGHT tension to your spindle. You must be careful not to pull the spindle out of the drive center (a Streb doesn't work for this, due to the spring loaded drive point).

        Now with your spindle under no compression, you can finish final cuts on your thin spindle.

        A conventional drive center or bobbin center works best for this.

        Ralg (who just finished six BBQ fork handles, 13 seam rippers and one tool handle)
        AnTir
      • Jim Hart
        Any chance of getting a photo if it? ... -- Jim Hart Conal OhAirt Aude Aliquid Digmun - *dare something worthy*
        Message 3 of 19 , Nov 27 12:24 PM
          Any chance of getting a photo if it?

          On Sun, Nov 27, 2011 at 11:37 AM, Ralph <n7bsn@...> wrote:
           

          Coming a little late to the discussion

          I have one of the OneWay steady's. It really too big for small items like bobbins, hair-sticks, etc. Some of the home-brew spindle steadys might work, but the one I would suggest is a "String Steady"

          That you are doing with this is using some string or thread to provide the steady pressure.

          A friend, that makes a lot of finials uses a very special tail-stock. It's a Jacob's chuck on a live center, with a retaining bolt treaded into the back of the Morse Taper. How you use it is, put the tail of the spindle into the Jacobs chuck and tighten down the tail-stock, then tighten the retaining bolt (obviously you need a hollow tail-stock to do this). I picked mine up from Penn State Industries, but it is also available from places like MSC-Direct.

          When you get your spindle down to the point where it starts flexing, reduce the tail-stock pressure and actually apply a SLIGHT tension to your spindle. You must be careful not to pull the spindle out of the drive center (a Streb doesn't work for this, due to the spring loaded drive point).

          Now with your spindle under no compression, you can finish final cuts on your thin spindle.

          A conventional drive center or bobbin center works best for this.

          Ralg (who just finished six BBQ fork handles, 13 seam rippers and one tool handle)
          AnTir




          --
          Jim Hart
            Conal OhAirt

          Aude Aliquid Digmun - dare something worthy
        • Ralph
          ... Instructions on the String Steady can be found here http://www.hiltonhandcraft.com/Articles/String_Steady.asp The live jacob s center can be seen at
          Message 4 of 19 , Nov 27 2:40 PM
            --- In medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com, Jim Hart <conalohairt@...> wrote:
            >
            > Any chance of getting a photo if it?
            >

            Instructions on the String Steady can be found here
            http://www.hiltonhandcraft.com/Articles/String_Steady.asp

            The live jacob's center can be seen at

            http://www.pennstateind.com/store/LDC2MT.html

            Note the ball-bearing race at the back. But this is also available at many hobby metal-working places also (note, many of the cheap ones you will have to drill and tap the back of the morse-taper your self
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