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RE: [MedievalSawdust] Need advice on cutting a wooden screw

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  • D. Young
    I also saw an ad for a company that makes them....check the woodworking mags at your local store. Fine Armour and Historical Reproductions Custom Commissions
    Message 1 of 16 , Oct 29, 2011
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      I also saw an ad for a company that makes them....check the woodworking mags at your local store.





      Fine Armour and Historical Reproductions

           Custom Commissions Welcome....!

      www.partsandtechnical.com
      (Well Formed Munitions Catalog Coming This Spring)
       



      To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
      From: afpopa@...
      Date: Sat, 29 Oct 2011 17:50:11 -0700
      Subject: Re: [MedievalSawdust] Need advice on cutting a wooden screw

       

      Well, they make tap and die sets for wooden screws, if you want the quick and easy option.  Grizzly makes some good ones.
       
       
      --- Marcellus

      From: khpv_lsc <lscampbell@...>
      To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Saturday, October 29, 2011 6:51 PM
      Subject: [MedievalSawdust] Need advice on cutting a wooden screw

       
      I have been lurking on this list for some while. Now I have a question that I'm sure someone here can help me with.

      Last year I made a small but solid workbench for taking to local SCA events, and much appreciated it is by other artisans when I take it out. At the moment, its only clamping facility is a couple of holdfasts. Even so, I find it very useful in my home workshop as a sort of period "Workmate".

      To make it even more useful, I want to add a leg vice to it, and this vice will have a wooden screw and nut which I will need to make.

      I have not done this before, but I am comfortable enough with the basic methods of cutting threads in the screw and nut. What I am interested in is any tips or hints you may have about finessing it, such as:

      * choosing a good pitch for the thread
      * how to keep the pitch uniform when starting to feed the blank screw through the cutting block. Ditto for starting the tap through the nut block.
      * any recommendations about a good profile for the thread.

      I am planning to use a 50mm dowel as the blank for the screw, with a thread of no more than 8-10mm depth. This is based on what looks right, and on my 40 year old memory of my grandfather's workbench which had a leg vice with a wooden screw, etc, etc.

      Any suggestions welcome.

      In service,
      Lowrens




    • conradh@efn.org
      ... You know the way people lay out threads sometimes, directly on the wood? Get that marked out accurately, then make a kerf in a scrap block and use it as a
      Message 2 of 16 , Oct 30, 2011
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        > I have not done this before, but I am comfortable enough with the basic
        > methods of cutting threads in the screw and nut. What I am interested in
        > is any tips or hints you may have about finessing it, such as:
        >
        > * choosing a good pitch for the thread
        > * how to keep the pitch uniform when starting to feed the blank screw
        > through the cutting block. Ditto for starting the tap through the nut
        > block.

        You know the way people lay out threads sometimes, directly on the wood?
        Get that marked out accurately, then make a kerf in a scrap block and use
        it as a depth stop by clamping it over a saw blade. Then saw out the
        spiral line representing the bottom of your thread, to the depth of blade
        exposed. The spiral kerf should engage your cutter enough to keep it on
        track.

        > * any recommendations about a good profile for the thread.

        I've always been told to use a plain V-thread. The square and Acme type
        threads you use for metal vise threads are supposed to work poorly in
        wood, though I've never made or seen a square one to compare.
        >
        Have you seen the material in Scott Landis' _The Workbench Book_ on this?
        Pp 14-15, 121-123, 126-127. Also Roy Underhill's _The Woodwright's
        Workbook_, chapter 3 "Screwboxes and Taps". Clearest explanations and
        tips on working from scratch that I've seen yet.

        Let us know what you choose and how it turns out!

        Ulfhedinn
      • Eric
        Hi Lowrens, I bought a few different sizes of wood taps and screw boxes from WoodCraft and the bottoming taps (for blind holes) to match. I find that I use
        Message 3 of 16 , Oct 30, 2011
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          Hi Lowrens,

          I bought a few different sizes of wood taps and screw boxes from WoodCraft and the bottoming taps (for blind holes) to match. I find that I use the 1.5" set most for SCA stuff. Using them is pretty easy, the only prep is to soak the end of the male peice in BLO (helps reduce chipping) for a bit before the cut. I also saturate the hole a few times with BLO to make the cut easier. Your best threads will be on/in hard maple, walnut is a good second. Here's a few links:

          http://www.woodcraft.com/Search2/Search.aspx?query=wood%20tap
          http://www2.woodcraft.com/PDF/77A32.pdf

          When I'm finished I use an oil finish to protect and lubricate the threads (both sides) without screwing up the tolerances to much. With a tap and screw box, if the joint ever gets a little cranky, you can run them both through your peices to clear the threads.

          Eirikr

          --- In medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com, Robert Capozello <afpopa@...> wrote:
          >
          > Well, they make tap and die sets for wooden screws, if you want the quick and easy option.  Grizzly makes some good ones.
          >  
          > http://www.grizzly.com/products/Wood-Threading-1-Tap/G1871
          >  
          > --- Marcellus
          >
          >
          > >________________________________
          > >From: khpv_lsc <lscampbell@...>
          > >To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
          > >Sent: Saturday, October 29, 2011 6:51 PM
          > >Subject: [MedievalSawdust] Need advice on cutting a wooden screw
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > > 
          > >
          > >I have been lurking on this list for some while. Now I have a question that I'm sure someone here can help me with.
          > >
          > >Last year I made a small but solid workbench for taking to local SCA events, and much appreciated it is by other artisans when I take it out. At the moment, its only clamping facility is a couple of holdfasts. Even so, I find it very useful in my home workshop as a sort of period "Workmate".
          > >
          > >To make it even more useful, I want to add a leg vice to it, and this vice will have a wooden screw and nut which I will need to make.
          > >
          > >I have not done this before, but I am comfortable enough with the basic methods of cutting threads in the screw and nut. What I am interested in is any tips or hints you may have about finessing it, such as:
          > >
          > >* choosing a good pitch for the thread
          > >* how to keep the pitch uniform when starting to feed the blank screw through the cutting block. Ditto for starting the tap through the nut block.
          > >* any recommendations about a good profile for the thread.
          > >
          > >I am planning to use a 50mm dowel as the blank for the screw, with a thread of no more than 8-10mm depth. This is based on what looks right, and on my 40 year old memory of my grandfather's workbench which had a leg vice with a wooden screw, etc, etc.
          > >
          > >Any suggestions welcome.
          > >
          > >In service,
          > >Lowrens
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          >
        • Alex Haugland
          a v groove profile for the screw is easiest and what I ve dominantly seen (and used) for wooden threads. You also are going to want a somewhat coarse pitch,
          Message 4 of 16 , Oct 30, 2011
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            a v groove profile for the screw is easiest and what I've dominantly seen (and used) for wooden threads.  You also are going to want a somewhat coarse pitch, as that grants the most strength to the theads and minimizes breaking them off under pressure.  perhaps something in the range of 4-6 tpi?  Taps, at least the modern style, are pretty self-guiding and my large wood threading taps look pretty much just like modern metalworking ones.  The biggest question is how are you planning on cutting the threads...  If you have a tap but no screwbox, then it isn't too difficult to build a screwbox to match the tap by using the tap to thread the screwbox to pull the round stock through it as it cuts the theads.  The trickiest part of building a screwbox is getting the cutter made and set up correctly.    essetially most of the screwboxes I've seen have a threaded wooden section with the cutter mounted to it in such a way that the cutter lines up with the start of the threads.  There is then a wooden "plate with a hole in it sized to take your round stock fastened over the cutter.  then you simply clamp your stock in a vise and feed the screwbox into the end.  As it cuts the thread in thedowel, the newly theaded section grabs the threads in the screwbox and pulls the uncut section of the dowel into the cutter ensuring that the pitch matches that of the tap that made the screwbox.

            Alysaundre Weldon
            Barony of Adiantum, An Tir



            On Oct 29, 2011, at 3:51 PM, "khpv_lsc" <lscampbell@...> wrote:

             

            I have been lurking on this list for some while. Now I have a question that I'm sure someone here can help me with.

            Last year I made a small but solid workbench for taking to local SCA events, and much appreciated it is by other artisans when I take it out. At the moment, its only clamping facility is a couple of holdfasts. Even so, I find it very useful in my home workshop as a sort of period "Workmate".

            To make it even more useful, I want to add a leg vice to it, and this vice will have a wooden screw and nut which I will need to make.

            I have not done this before, but I am comfortable enough with the basic methods of cutting threads in the screw and nut. What I am interested in is any tips or hints you may have about finessing it, such as:

            * choosing a good pitch for the thread
            * how to keep the pitch uniform when starting to feed the blank screw through the cutting block. Ditto for starting the tap through the nut block.
            * any recommendations about a good profile for the thread.

            I am planning to use a 50mm dowel as the blank for the screw, with a thread of no more than 8-10mm depth. This is based on what looks right, and on my 40 year old memory of my grandfather's workbench which had a leg vice with a wooden screw, etc, etc.

            Any suggestions welcome.

            In service,
            Lowrens

          • Jim Hart
            Roy Underhill has a chapter in one of his books on the subject.... If someone does not beat me to it and I have time later I can check to see which one. ... --
            Message 5 of 16 , Oct 30, 2011
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              Roy Underhill has a chapter in one of his books on the subject.... If someone does not beat me to it and I have time later I can check to see which one.

              On Sat, Oct 29, 2011 at 6:51 PM, khpv_lsc <lscampbell@...> wrote:
               

              I have been lurking on this list for some while. Now I have a question that I'm sure someone here can help me with.

              Last year I made a small but solid workbench for taking to local SCA events, and much appreciated it is by other artisans when I take it out. At the moment, its only clamping facility is a couple of holdfasts. Even so, I find it very useful in my home workshop as a sort of period "Workmate".

              To make it even more useful, I want to add a leg vice to it, and this vice will have a wooden screw and nut which I will need to make.

              I have not done this before, but I am comfortable enough with the basic methods of cutting threads in the screw and nut. What I am interested in is any tips or hints you may have about finessing it, such as:

              * choosing a good pitch for the thread
              * how to keep the pitch uniform when starting to feed the blank screw through the cutting block. Ditto for starting the tap through the nut block.
              * any recommendations about a good profile for the thread.

              I am planning to use a 50mm dowel as the blank for the screw, with a thread of no more than 8-10mm depth. This is based on what looks right, and on my 40 year old memory of my grandfather's workbench which had a leg vice with a wooden screw, etc, etc.

              Any suggestions welcome.

              In service,
              Lowrens




              --
              Jim Hart
                Conal OhAirt

              Aude Aliquid Digmun - dare something worthy
            • Peter Ellison
              I have pondered this for a while. Highland Woodworking has an inch and a half 6 threads tap and screw box.
              Message 6 of 16 , Oct 31, 2011
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                I have pondered this for a while.

                Highland Woodworking has an inch and a half 6 threads tap and screw box.
                http://www.highlandwoodworking.com/manualwoodthreader1-126tpi.aspx

                Another tool that is available is by Beall Tool:
                http://www.bealltool.com/products/threading/bigthreader.php
                This too will do 5 threads per inch, but is a bit more expensive and uses a router to form the threads.  Would be great if you want to make lots of them.
                Example of the tool in use, and a clever method for getting the blank made.
                http://www.wkfinetools.com/contrib/bSmalser/art/hScrewClamp/hScrewClamp-01.asp

                 Roy has using one in the Woodwrites Apprenticed, there is also one of the shows that uses one you can watch for free.

                The problem for me is that to make a screw box you need a tap. If you know a machinist with a thread cutting lathe they could make a tap for you.  There are historical examples of taps, I'm at a loss for my documentation but if I recall correctly it is X shaped (instead of round like modern ones), with the teeth cut into the legs of the X.  This looked like something that with some work would be possible to make with a file and a lot of patience.  That would get you a tap, then you could cut the thread in the screw box, and then make the threads on the screw.

                The other way described in another email is to manually cut the threads with a saw and then use that to cut the nut.  Since in the end to be useful you need both the nut and the threaded rod.  This is an old process, looks like a major undertaking but something that would be possible.

                There is one more type of thread cutter called a plane makers tap, this is a hollow tap that has the threads on the outside and the wood falls in the middle.  I think these are a later invention for people making really pretty plough planes.

                I have been interested in attempting this but got hung up on getting a tap to cut the nut.

                Peter

                > Roy Underhill has a chapter in one of his books on the subject.... If
                > someone does not beat me to it and I have time later I can check to see
                > which one.
                >
                > On Sat, Oct 29, 2011 at 6:51 PM, khpv_lsc <lscampbell@...> wrote:
                >
                >> **
                >>
                >>
                >> I have been lurking on this list for some while. Now I have a question
                >> that I'm sure someone here can help me with.
                >>
                >> Last year I made a small but solid workbench for taking to local SCA
                >> events, and much appreciated it is by other artisans when I take it out.
                >> At
                >> the moment, its only clamping facility is a couple of holdfasts. Even
                >> so, I
                >> find it very useful in my home workshop as a sort of period "Workmate".
                >>
                >> To make it even more useful, I want to add a leg vice to it, and this
                >> vice
                >> will have a wooden screw and nut which I will need to make.
                >>
                >> I have not done this before, but I am comfortable enough with the basic
                >> methods of cutting threads in the screw and nut. What I am interested in
                >> is
                >> any tips or hints you may have about finessing it, such as:
                >>
                >> * choosing a good pitch for the thread
                >> * how to keep the pitch uniform when starting to feed the blank screw
                >> through the cutting block. Ditto for starting the tap through the nut
                >> block.
                >> * any recommendations about a good profile for the thread.
                >>
                >> I am planning to use a 50mm dowel as the blank for the screw, with a
                >> thread of no more than 8-10mm depth. This is based on what looks right,
                >> and
                >> on my 40 year old memory of my grandfather's workbench which had a leg
                >> vice
                >> with a wooden screw, etc, etc.
                >>
                >> Any suggestions welcome.
                >>
                >> In service,
                >> Lowrens
                >>
                >>
                >>
                >
                >
                >
                > --
                > Jim Hart
                > Conal OhAirt
                >
                > Aude Aliquid Digmun - *dare something worthy*
                >
              • Peter Ellison
                Sorry for the reply to my own post, but I forgot to include a good article on making a screw box:
                Message 7 of 16 , Oct 31, 2011
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                  Sorry for the reply to my own post, but I forgot to include a good article on making a screw box:

                  http://www.wkfinetools.com/contrib/dAssis/art/TapDie/TapDie-01.asp

                  Takes you step by step through the pieces of making the screw box.

                  He uses a bolt as the die, something that for a bench screw will likely not work unless you can find a pretty serious bolt.

                  Peter

                  >
                  >
                  > I have pondered this for a while.
                  >
                  > Highland Woodworking has an
                  > inch and a half 6 threads tap and screw box.
                  > http://www.highlandwoodworking.com/manualwoodthreader1-126tpi.aspx
                  >
                  > Another tool that is available is by Beall Tool:
                  > http://www.bealltool.com/products/threading/bigthreader.php
                  > This
                  > too will do 5 threads per inch, but is a bit more expensive and uses a
                  > router to form the threads.  Would be great if you want to make lots
                  > of them.
                  > Example of the tool in use, and a clever method for getting
                  > the blank made.
                  > http://www.wkfinetools.com/contrib/bSmalser/art/hScrewClamp/hScrewClamp-01.asp
                  >
                  >  Roy has using one in the Woodwrites Apprenticed, there is
                  > also one of the shows that uses one you can watch for free.
                  >
                  > The problem for me is that to make a screw box you need a tap. If you
                  > know a machinist with a thread cutting lathe they could make a tap for
                  > you.  There are historical examples of taps, I'm at a loss for my
                  > documentation but if I recall correctly it is X shaped (instead of round
                  > like modern ones), with the teeth cut into the legs of the X.  This
                  > looked like something that with some work would be possible to make with a
                  > file and a lot of patience.  That would get you a tap, then you could
                  > cut the thread in the screw box, and then make the threads on the
                  > screw.
                  >
                  > The other way described in another email is to manually
                  > cut the threads with a saw and then use that to cut the nut.  Since
                  > in the end to be useful you need both the nut and the threaded rod. 
                  > This is an old process, looks like a major undertaking but something that
                  > would be possible.
                  >
                  > There is one more type of thread cutter
                  > called a plane makers tap, this is a hollow tap that has the threads on
                  > the outside and the wood falls in the middle.  I think these are a
                  > later invention for people making really pretty plough planes.
                  >
                  > I have been interested in attempting this but got hung up on getting a
                  > tap to cut the nut.
                  >
                  > Peter
                  >
                  >> Roy Underhill has a
                  > chapter in one of his books on the subject.... If
                  >> someone does
                  > not beat me to it and I have time later I can check to see
                  >> which
                  > one.
                  >>
                  >> On Sat, Oct 29, 2011 at 6:51 PM, khpv_lsc
                  > <lscampbell@...> wrote:
                  >>
                  >>> **
                  >>>
                  >>>
                  >>> I have been lurking on this list
                  > for some while. Now I have a question
                  >>> that I'm sure someone
                  > here can help me with.
                  >>>
                  >>> Last year I made a
                  > small but solid workbench for taking to local SCA
                  >>> events,
                  > and much appreciated it is by other artisans when I take it out.
                  >>> At
                  >>> the moment, its only clamping facility is a
                  > couple of holdfasts. Even
                  >>> so, I
                  >>> find it very
                  > useful in my home workshop as a sort of period "Workmate".
                  >>>
                  >>> To make it even more useful, I want to add a leg
                  > vice to it, and this
                  >>> vice
                  >>> will have a wooden
                  > screw and nut which I will need to make.
                  >>>
                  >>> I
                  > have not done this before, but I am comfortable enough with the basic
                  >>> methods of cutting threads in the screw and nut. What I am
                  > interested in
                  >>> is
                  >>> any tips or hints you may
                  > have about finessing it, such as:
                  >>>
                  >>> * choosing a
                  > good pitch for the thread
                  >>> * how to keep the pitch uniform
                  > when starting to feed the blank screw
                  >>> through the cutting
                  > block. Ditto for starting the tap through the nut
                  >>> block.
                  >>> * any recommendations about a good profile for the thread.
                  >>>
                  >>> I am planning to use a 50mm dowel as the blank
                  > for the screw, with a
                  >>> thread of no more than 8-10mm depth.
                  > This is based on what looks right,
                  >>> and
                  >>> on my
                  > 40 year old memory of my grandfather's workbench which had a leg
                  >>> vice
                  >>> with a wooden screw, etc, etc.
                  >>>
                  >>> Any suggestions welcome.
                  >>>
                  >>> In service,
                  >>> Lowrens
                  >>>
                  >>>
                  >>>
                  >>
                  >>
                  >>
                  >> --
                  >> Jim Hart
                  >> Conal OhAirt
                  >>
                  >> Aude Aliquid
                  > Digmun - *dare something worthy*
                  >>
                  >
                • conradh@efn.org
                  ... The X shape you describe is used in modern metalworking taps too. It gives lots of cutting edges and the hollows between give somewhere for the chips to
                  Message 8 of 16 , Oct 31, 2011
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                    > The problem for me is that to make a screw box you need a tap. If you
                    > know a machinist with a thread cutting lathe they could make a tap for
                    > you.  There are historical examples of taps, I'm at a loss for my
                    > documentation but if I recall correctly it is X shaped (instead of round
                    > like modern ones), with the teeth cut into the legs of the X.  This
                    > looked like something that with some work would be possible to make with a
                    > file and a lot of patience.  That would get you a tap, then you could
                    > cut the thread in the screw box, and then make the threads on the
                    > screw.

                    The X shape you describe is used in modern metalworking taps too. It gives
                    lots of cutting edges and the hollows between give somewhere for the chips
                    to go. This is really important because taps break or tear out the thread
                    (or simply jam) when they clog with chips. When threading a hole of any
                    depth, it's important to back the tap out regularly and clear it and the
                    hole of chips.

                    As St. Roy describes in his book (not the video), forging the hollows into
                    the blank tap before filing can save a hell of a lot of filing. As can
                    drawing out the stem of the tap. The challenge comes in forging so
                    carefully as to leave the stem reasonably concentric and the surface of
                    the blank cylindrical enough between the fullered hollows to do accurate
                    layout of the teeth. A lathe would help a lot for truing it up. Makes me
                    wonder if the old-time tap makers didn't forge and then turn their blanks.
                    You _can_ turn iron on a lathe with handheld chisels if you're very
                    careful and keep the toolrest really close--and if your lathe is heavy and
                    rigid. George Stephenson, in the 1820's, is supposed to have turned
                    castings for his pioneering locomotive on a great wheel lathe, with the
                    help of two husky turnwheels and a lot of gin, no doubt. For a modern
                    worker, turning the blank past a spinning sanding drum or small stemmed
                    grindstone would be less scary if less authentic.

                    All this last is speculation. I've made a tap and want to try some larger
                    ones, but haven't tried turning them with period lathes. If you try
                    forging one, remember that top and bottom fullers don't necessarily take
                    equal bites! Rotate your piece 180, and allow for cooling or reheat to a
                    uniform color after every hammer blow. And don't go overboard with the
                    fullering; a little bit saves filing, but trying to forge to final form is
                    going to leave you uncorrectably out of round unless you're a hell of a
                    lot better around a forge than I am. (Quite possible, of course!)

                    Also remember that the initial diameter of the round stock is going to
                    swell a bit between the hollows, from the fullering if you do that. (In
                    other words, the distance across the high ridges where the teeth will be a
                    little larger after forging, as metal moves sideways from the hollows.)
                    No problem to a period worker, who wasn't trying to standardize anything
                    beyond fitting his own male and female threads. If having a tap that cuts
                    a precise inch and a half or whatever is important to you, then use a
                    lathe or do the job entirely by filing.

                    Ulfhedinn
                  • Alex Haugland
                    It is also possible and probably easier to file on a lathe, which can be a very effective way to round out and center a hand-forging for the tap (as well as
                    Message 9 of 16 , Oct 31, 2011
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                      It is also possible and probably easier to file on a lathe, which can be a very effective way to round out and center a hand-forging for the tap (as well as set the feed taper after filing your teeth, at least if you're copying a modern tap design)  for the poor-man's approach, you could also chuck up the forging in a drill press and probably file it close enough to round for the purpose of making a tap.  Just use something clamped to the table to act as a guide fence to stabilize the file on.

                      --Alysaundre Weldon
                      Barony of Adiantum, An Tir

                      On 10/31/2011 11:57 AM, conradh@... wrote:  


                      As St. Roy describes in his book (not the video), forging the hollows into
                      the blank tap before filing can save a hell of a lot of filing. As can
                      drawing out the stem of the tap. The challenge comes in forging so
                      carefully as to leave the stem reasonably concentric and the surface of
                      the blank cylindrical enough between the fullered hollows to do accurate
                      layout of the teeth. A lathe would help a lot for truing it up. Makes me
                      wonder if the old-time tap makers didn't forge and then turn their blanks.
                      You _can_ turn iron on a lathe with handheld chisels if you're very
                      careful and keep the toolrest really close--and if your lathe is heavy and
                      rigid. George Stephenson, in the 1820's, is supposed to have turned
                      castings for his pioneering locomotive on a great wheel lathe, with the
                      help of two husky turnwheels and a lot of gin, no doubt. For a modern
                      worker, turning the blank past a spinning sanding drum or small stemmed
                      grindstone would be less scary if less authentic.


                      Ulfhedinn


                    • conradh@efn.org
                      ... Thanks for mentioning what I should have! If you do this in the drill press, it really helps to make a little conical dead center or pilot pin for the
                      Message 10 of 16 , Nov 1, 2011
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                        > It is also possible and probably easier to file on a lathe, which can be
                        > a very effective way to round out and center a hand-forging for the tap
                        > (as well as set the feed taper after filing your teeth, at least if
                        > you're copying a modern tap design) for the poor-man's approach, you
                        > could also chuck up the forging in a drill press and probably file it
                        > close enough to round for the purpose of making a tap. Just use
                        > something clamped to the table to act as a guide fence to stabilize the
                        > file on.
                        >
                        > --Alysaundre Weldon
                        > Barony of Adiantum, An Tir
                        >
                        Thanks for mentioning what I should have!

                        If you do this in the drill press, it really helps to make a little
                        conical dead center or pilot pin for the bottom end of the workpiece,
                        something that can mount in the center hole of the drill press table.
                        Turns the drill press into an expedient lathe.

                        Lathe filing works great for smoothing a piece. For serious shaping, a
                        problem can develop where the piece goes more and more out of round the
                        longer you file. I think it may be a rhythmic bouncing effect, like the
                        way a dirt road develops corrugations from bouncing wheels--a high spot on
                        the workpiece reduces the file pressure on the surface just beyond it.

                        The file rest you mention helps. So does changing speeds on the lathe
                        several times--it breaks up the rhythm of the bouncing before it can get
                        bad.

                        Ulfhedinn
                      • khpv_lsc
                        Thanks you to all those who have put forward suggestions about this. I had read Roy Underhill s books and have the basic ideas from there. I can t readily
                        Message 11 of 16 , Nov 2, 2011
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                          Thanks you to all those who have put forward suggestions about this.

                          I had read Roy Underhill's books and have the basic ideas from there. I can't readily re-read these since the main library in Christchurch is still closed from the earthquake earlier this year.

                          I don't want to use commercial kit - I very much want to make the screw and nut from scratch.

                          --- In medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com, "Peter Ellison" <pellison@...> wrote:
                          >
                          > Sorry for the reply to my own post, but I forgot to include a good article on making a screw box:
                          >
                          > http://www.wkfinetools.com/contrib/dAssis/art/TapDie/TapDie-01.asp

                          This is very good, and fills in a few details I had forgotten.

                          The suggestion by Ulfhedinn about precutting a guide for the thread with a saw and depth-stop is also a very good one.

                          > >
                          > >> Roy
                          > Underhill has a
                          > > chapter in one of his books on the subject....
                          > If
                          > >> someone does
                          > > not beat me to it and I have time
                          > later I can check to see
                          > >> which
                          > > one.

                          I'll let you know how it goes.

                          In service,
                          Lowrens
                        • Broom
                          ... Oh, Ulfhedinn, you and your fancy power drill! THIS is the way to do it: www.liveleak.com/view?i=1a6_1319771245 | Broom IAmBroom @ gmail . com
                          Message 12 of 16 , Nov 2, 2011
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                            > If you do this in the drill press, it really helps to make a little
                            > conical dead center or pilot pin for the bottom end of the workpiece,
                            > something that can mount in the center hole of the drill press table.
                            > Turns the drill press into an expedient lathe.

                            Oh, Ulfhedinn, you and your fancy power drill! THIS is the way to do it:
                            www.liveleak.com/view?i=1a6_1319771245

                            ' | Broom IAmBroom @ gmail . com
                            ' | cellphone: 412-389-1997
                            ' | 923 Haslage Ave, Pittsburgh, PA 15212
                            '\|/ "Discere et docere", which means:
                            '/|\ "Thank God for secular humanism."
                            //|\\ - John F. Kennedy, according to Mort Sahl
                          • conradh@efn.org
                            ... Couldn t open the link, but much of this is based on stuff I ve seen or done in the past. Right now, frex, my metalworking lathe is down with out-of-round
                            Message 13 of 16 , Nov 2, 2011
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                              >> If you do this in the drill press, it really helps to make a little
                              >> conical dead center or pilot pin for the bottom end of the workpiece,
                              >> something that can mount in the center hole of the drill press table.
                              >> Turns the drill press into an expedient lathe.
                              >
                              > Oh, Ulfhedinn, you and your fancy power drill! THIS is the way to do it:
                              > www.liveleak.com/view?i=1a6_1319771245



                              Couldn't open the link, but much of this is based on stuff I've seen or
                              done in the past. Right now, frex, my metalworking lathe is down with
                              out-of-round Babbit bearings and my "fancy power drill" needs a new motor!
                              So I'm as interested in the suggestions here as the OP is!

                              Ulfhedinn
                            • Broom
                              ... Mostly it was a humorous reply. The link is a video of a Marrakesh man operating a hand-pulled bow-lathe, pressing his gouge against a makeshift rest with
                              Message 14 of 16 , Nov 3, 2011
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                                >>> Turns the drill press into an expedient lathe.
                                >>
                                >> Oh, Ulfhedinn, you and your fancy power drill! THIS is the way to do it:
                                >>   www.liveleak.com/view?i=1a6_1319771245
                                >
                                > Couldn't open the link, but much of this is based on stuff I've seen or
                                > done in the past.  Right now, frex, my metalworking lathe is down with
                                > out-of-round Babbit bearings and my "fancy power drill" needs a new motor!
                                >  So I'm as interested in the suggestions here as the OP is!

                                Mostly it was a humorous reply.

                                The link is a video of a Marrakesh man operating a hand-pulled
                                bow-lathe, pressing his gouge against a makeshift rest with his bare
                                foot to turn out chess pieces. Amazingly simple: string, "C"-frame,
                                two pivot points, a rest (iron bar?), and a gouge.

                                ' | Broom IAmBroom @ gmail . com
                                ' | cellphone: 412-389-1997
                                '\|/ 923 Haslage Ave, Pittsburgh, PA 15212
                                '/|\ "Discere et docere", which means:
                                //|\\ "Life is overrated and always fatal." - baka-san, Fark
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