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RE: [MedievalSawdust] Starting hand tools

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  • D. Young
    Also screws have been used in wood (mostly for hinges) since about 1500.....Ive found examples that far back. Rare to be sure, but increasingly more frequent
    Message 1 of 30 , Oct 29, 2011
      Also screws have been used in wood (mostly for hinges) since about 1500.....Ive found examples that far back.

      Rare to be sure, but increasingly more frequent as we enter the 17th century. 



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      To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
      From: conradh@...
      Date: Fri, 28 Oct 2011 14:00:30 -0700
      Subject: Re: [MedievalSawdust] Starting hand tools

       
      > Didn't have a hammer as such back then. or at least not for woodworking
      > purposes, Ironwork yes. The first hammer used in woodworking was actually
      > the first screwdriver. 
      >

      Not really true at all. First of all, nails go way back in woodworking,
      and they've generally been driven and drawn with hammers. The Romans made
      claw hammers that looked just like the ones medieval smiths made for
      medieval carpenters. The only real change in modern times was the
      adze-type eye that replaced the earlier simple eye, and ISTR that's a
      thing of the 19th century.

      Secondly, we're taught today to only use a wooden mallet for driving
      chisels, because when wood and iron are pounded together, the wood loses.
      However, this also applies to all-metal chisels, which should be driven
      with metal hammers. The Royal Ontario Museum has a metal hammer and an
      all-metal gouge, frex, from a sixteenth-century London dig. You can see a
      photo of them in _The Secular Spirit, Life and Art at the End of the
      Middle Ages_, Metropolitan Museum of Art, Dutton, New York, 1975. p 109.

      Ulfhedinn


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