Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: Finish for a Throne

Expand Messages
  • Eric
    Hi Bercilak, A number of people have suggested linseed oil, boiled linseed oil and blends that contain the same. My preferred finish for your type of project
    Message 1 of 38 , Sep 13, 2011
    View Source
    • 0 Attachment
      Hi Bercilak,

      A number of people have suggested linseed oil, boiled linseed oil and blends that contain the same. My preferred finish for your type of project is Tried & True "original wood finish".
      http://www.triedandtruewoodfinish.com/products.htm

      Here's a recent post that discussed boiled linseed oil....

      =================================
      Post #14702 - Aug 4, 2011

      Re: Medieval Wood Treatment

      I guess it's time for the BLO conversation again...

      There are two products sold today that are labelled Boiled Linseed Oil. The modern product that you mentioned is regular linseed oil with heavy metals added to speed drying. The natural product is filtered and heated to polymerize the oil. Here a quote that discusses both, "cold pressed oil contains about 30% protein that is removed in a cleaning process. The removal of the protein is crucial for preventing mold and mildew. When the protein is removed, the oil can be boiled and sterilized. This is contrary to the linseed oil products available in most paint stores. These products are NOT actually boiled even though they are labeled "boiled". Linseed oil that has the protein cannot be boiled, it is technically impossible (the oil will become explosive when heated.) If the linseed oil is not boiled and sterilized it does not dry. Substantial amounts of
      chemical driers have to then be added to these "unclean" linseed oil products."

      Alternatively, the natural product, polymerized or "stand" oil, is generated by heating linseed (or others like soybean or tung) oil near 300 °C for a few days in the complete absence of air. Under these conditions, the polyunsaturated fatty esters convert to conjugated dienes, which then undergo Diels-Alder reactions, leading to crosslinking. The product, which is highly viscous, gives highly uniform coatings that "dry" to more elastic coatings than linseed oil itself. Coatings prepared from stand oils are less prone to yellowing than are coatings derived from the parent oils.

      Although both products are called Boiled Linseed Oil, they are very different animals. I believe that the natural product is much closer to the drying oils that were used in SCA period. A reasonable amount of information about original finishes can be determined though detailed analysis of extant objects, like types of oils and pigments. Analysis has shown that linseed oil was used throughout much of western Europe during SCA period.

      There are various vendors that still sell the natural versions; one online source is SolventFreePaint.com (here's a link)
      http://www.solventfreepaint.com/index.htm
      and Lee Valley sells the "Tried & True" finishes that are blends that include natural BLO. I use the T&T finishes and have been very satisfied with the results.

      In Service to the Dream,
      Eirikr
      Ashgrove, Barony of Altavia, Caid

      --- In medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com, "Royce" <rcetlin@...> wrote:
      >
      > Greetings all,
      >
      >
      >
      > So after having been inducted into my barony's woodworker's guild by
      > osmosis, I've been presented with a minor challenge. I've been tasked with
      > coming up with a plan of action for refinishing our baronial thrones. They
      > are made of oak, unstained, and off the top of my head, I don't believe they
      > are finished anymore than good sanding.
      >
      >
      >
      > My thought is to keep the thrones looking as close to medieval as possible
      > so I'd prefer to avoid most common poly's and lacquers. I would like to get
      > a matte to semi-gloss finish, with some resistance to bumps and such. They
      > will be packed in moving blanket bags that are going to be made rather
      > shortly. Also, the environment they are kept in is in the southwest (Las
      > Vegas area), so the humidity on average is pretty low and exposure to rain,
      > minimal at worst.
      >
      >
      >
      > I was thinking several coats of a decent wax, buffing each layer applied.
      >
      >
      >
      > Thank you in advance,
      >
      >
      >
      > Lord Bercilak Von Nurenberg
      >
      > Mka Royce Cetlin
      >
    • D. Young
      try it in your coffee Jim ...you can tell its been boiled or not. ... Fine Armour and Historical Reproductions Custom Commissions Welcome....!
      Message 38 of 38 , Sep 14, 2011
      View Source
      • 0 Attachment
        try it in your coffee Jim   ...you can tell its been boiled or not.

        :)




        Fine Armour and Historical Reproductions

             Custom Commissions Welcome....!

        www.partsandtechnical.com
        (Well Formed Munitions Catalog Coming This Spring)
         



        To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
        From: conalohairt@...
        Date: Wed, 14 Sep 2011 08:04:12 -0400
        Subject: Re: [MedievalSawdust] Re: Finish for a Throne

         

        I've got a can of it in my paint cabinet right now.

        That is the chemically treated stuff. I've used it before. I was wondering about boiled linseed
        oil that has actually been 'boiled'.



        On Tue, Sep 13, 2011 at 8:43 PM, Bill Fariss <wfariss@...> wrote:
         

        Lowes or Home Depot has screw top cans in the paint department. Look for Boiled Linseed oil.

        William Fariss
        "Never look back unless you want to go that way"



        From: Jim Hart <conalohairt@...>
        To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Tuesday, September 13, 2011 7:56 PM
        Subject: Re: [MedievalSawdust] Re: Finish for a Throne

         
        hmmm... no luck finding a truly boiled linseed oil in a quick google search.
        Is there a commercial source for linseed oil that has actually been 'boiled'?

        Or I can cruise yard sales and look for a crock pot and try it myself OUTSIDE.

        On Tue, Sep 13, 2011 at 7:35 PM, Siegfried <siegfried@...> wrote:
        Boiled.   (More specifically, the stuff you get in the big can at the
        box stores, which says 'boiled' but really is chemically treated to dry)

        Siegfried


        On 9/13/11 4:42 PM, tsura_to_je_stariji wrote:
        > Thankful for sharing. One question: Boiled or raw linseed oil?
        >
        >
        > Thanks -
        > Tsura
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > --- In medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com, Siegfried <siegfried@...> wrote:
        >>
        >> Depends on what you want the finished product to be.
        >>
        >> I myself have regularly made my 'Medieval Mix' ...
        >>
        >> By taking a block of white beeswax, shaving it on a cheese grater, and
        >> filling a quart jar 1/2 full of it.
        >>
        >> Then pouring enough turpentine over it to cover the bees wax, then
        >> topping off the jar with linseed oil.
        >>
        >> You then have to let it sit.  A month does good.   Stirring it helps.
        >> In the end, you have a goopy, gloppy, mixture.  Easy to smear on, then
        >> rub in.
        >>
        >> However, the finish doesn't fill pores at all, and stays 'soft'.  So in
        >> heavy use situations, you will get 'dirt buildup' on them.  Which one
        >> might argue looks period :)
        >>
        >> I've seen other people make the same mixture, but go much heavier on the
        >> wax.  And end up with the finished product being much more like a modern
        >> paste wax.
        >>
        >> ...
        >>
        >> Of course, you coudl also just go with multiple coats of linseed oil.
        >>
        >> Siegfried
        >>
        >>
        >> On 9/13/11 8:20 AM, jjasoneeric@... wrote:
        >>>
        >>>
        >>> What would those ratios be?
        >>>
        >>> Thank You
        >>>
        >>>
        >>>
        >>> ---- Original Message ----
        >>> From: Graham Eyre <geyre@...>
        >>> To: medievalsawdust <medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com>
        >>> Sent: Tue, Sep 13, 2011 1:17 am
        >>> Subject: Re: [MedievalSawdust] Finish for a Throne
        >>>
        >>>
        >>> I have found over the years that a mixture of Bees Wax, Linseed Oil  and
        >>> Raw Turpentine is really excellent.
        >>>
        >>> *From:* Royce <rcetlin@... <mailto:rcetlin@...>>
        >>> *To:* medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
        >>> <mailto:medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com>
        >>> *Sent:* Tuesday, 13 September 2011 5:09 PM
        >>> *Subject:* [MedievalSawdust] Finish for a Throne
        >>>
        >>>
        >>>
        >>> Greetings all,
        >>>
        >>> So after having been inducted into my barony’s woodworker’s guild by
        >>> osmosis, I’ve been presented with a minor challenge.  I’ve been tasked
        >>> with coming up with a plan of action for refinishing our baronial
        >>> thrones.  They are made of oak, unstained, and off the top of my head, I
        >>> don’t believe they are finished anymore than good sanding.
        >>>
        >>> My thought is to keep the thrones looking as close to medieval as
        >>> possible so I’d prefer to avoid most common poly’s and lacquers.  I
        >>> would like to get a matte to semi-gloss finish, with some resistance to
        >>> bumps and such.  They will be packed in moving blanket bags that are
        >>> going to be made rather shortly.  Also, the environment they are kept in
        >>> is in the southwest (Las Vegas area), so the humidity on average is
        >>> pretty low and exposure to rain, minimal at worst.
        >>>
        >>> I was thinking several coats of a decent wax, buffing each layer applied.
        >>>
        >>> Thank you in advance,
        >>>
        >>> Lord Bercilak Von Nurenberg
        >>> Mka Royce Cetlin
        >>>
        >>>
        >>>
        >>>
        >>>
        >>>
        >>>
        >>
        >> --
        >> Barun Siegfried Sebastian Faust - Barony of Highland Foorde - Atlantia
        >> http://hf.atlantia.sca.org/ - http://crossbows.biz/ - http://eliw.com/
        >>
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > ------------------------------------
        >
        >
        >

        --
        Barun Siegfried Sebastian Faust - Barony of Highland Foorde - Atlantia
        http://hf.atlantia.sca.org/ - http://crossbows.biz/ - http://eliw.com/


        ------------------------------------

        <*> To visit your group on the web, go to:
            http://groups.yahoo.com/group/medievalsawdust/Yahoo! Groups Links

        <*> To visit your group on the web, go to:
           http://groups.yahoo.com/group/medievalsawdust/

        <*> Your email settings:
           Individual Email | Traditional

        <*> To change settings online go to:
           http://groups.yahoo.com/group/medievalsawdust/join
           (Yahoo! ID required)

        <*> To change settings via email:
           medievalsawdust-digest@yahoogroups.com
           medievalsawdust-fullfeatured@yahoogroups.com

        <*> To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
           medievalsawdust-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com

        <*> Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to:
           http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/




        --
        Jim Hart
          Conal OhAirt

        Aude Aliquid Digmun - dare something worthy






        --
        Jim Hart
          Conal OhAirt

        Aude Aliquid Digmun - dare something worthy

      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.