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Weapons Chest Advice

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  • Ron Jachim
    I m a 17th century Polish cavalry reenactor in need of a weapons chest. In period, I would have had a horsedrawn wagon and a couple of peasants to cart my
    Message 1 of 3 , Feb 16, 2004
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      I'm a 17th century Polish cavalry reenactor in need of a weapons
      chest. In period, I would have had a horsedrawn wagon and a couple of
      peasants to cart my stuff around, in the mundane world, I travel with
      wife & kids in a minivan.

      I'm considering a chest with internal dimensions of about 11"x13"x40".
      This covers the size needed for sabers, war hammers, arrows, and
      various soft kit stuff. It would also seat two adults. My thought
      was to use an internal frame to hold arrows and possibly in the bottom
      to hold the other weapons, sort of like an old-fashioned carpenters
      chest. Does anyone use a large chest like this? Any advice?

      On a related note, I'm thinking of 1x (one by) pine to lighten the
      case (rather than oak, for example). I read with interest the
      comments on oak vs pine vs other wood, but I have 1x12 pine on hand.
      Any thoughts on paint vs. oil? Personally, I like the look of dark
      oiled wood.

      By way of further introduction, I make reenactment grade medieval
      arrows. As a woodworker, I'm a true amateur but as a fletcher, I'm
      pretty good. I'm not in the SCA, but I've toyed with joining.

      Ron
      XVIIc Polish Pancerni
    • B.S.R.Lee
      Free advice is worth every penny you pay for it ;-)..... First, I d recommend you go bother the local library - I think the book you will be looking for is
      Message 2 of 3 , Feb 17, 2004
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        Free advice is worth every penny you pay for it ;-).....

        First, I'd recommend you go bother the local library - I think the book you
        will be looking for is 'The Toolbox Book' by Jim Tolpin, published by
        Taunton Press. It has an extensive section on pre-modern tool boxes,
        nothing is provably pre-1700, but it has some good ideas on dividers,
        partitions & sliding tills. Also see if they can get 'Artifacts from
        Wrecks' edited by Mark Redknap, published by Oxbow Books (Oxbow Monograph
        #84) - you want chapter 6, pages 87-98 if they can only get a photocopy.

        As for the chest, I'd seriously look at extending the ends down into legs.
        This does 2 things: first it keeps the main body of goods out of reach of
        the damp, so your sabre won't grow its own brown fur coat. Secondly it
        makes it a lot more comfortable to sit on - I don't know how tall you & you
        good lady are, or how thick a cushion you want to sit on, if any, but those
        extra few inches to rise & fall will take their toll after a while. You
        can pack stuff under the chest between the legs when travelling in the van
        if you don't want to lie the chest on its side.

        I'd also think about making the lid of the chest an inch or so bigger all
        round than the body, then make a grove around the underneath of the
        overhang on all 3 or 4 sides (depends on how you do the hinges). This
        should help stop rain (or other liquids) from running off the lid & into
        the contents.

        If you are going to use nominal 1x12 pine I think you will end up with
        something closer to 11x10x38 inside unless you join boards to make
        something wider. Take a good look at
        http://www.medievalwood.org/charles/chestpln.html on construction details -
        these are provable at least back to the Mary Rose. Chas. (Fingers) Oakley
        is here on the list too.

        regards
        Brusi


        At 02:58 PM 2/17/04, you wrote:
        >I'm a 17th century Polish cavalry reenactor in need of a weapons
        >chest. In period, I would have had a horsedrawn wagon and a couple of
        >peasants to cart my stuff around, in the mundane world, I travel with
        >wife & kids in a minivan.
        >
        >I'm considering a chest with internal dimensions of about 11"x13"x40".
        > This covers the size needed for sabers, war hammers, arrows, and
        >various soft kit stuff. It would also seat two adults. My thought
        >was to use an internal frame to hold arrows and possibly in the bottom
        >to hold the other weapons, sort of like an old-fashioned carpenters
        >chest. Does anyone use a large chest like this? Any advice?
        >
        >On a related note, I'm thinking of 1x (one by) pine to lighten the
        >case (rather than oak, for example). I read with interest the
        >comments on oak vs pine vs other wood, but I have 1x12 pine on hand.
        >Any thoughts on paint vs. oil? Personally, I like the look of dark
        >oiled wood.
        >
        >By way of further introduction, I make reenactment grade medieval
        >arrows. As a woodworker, I'm a true amateur but as a fletcher, I'm
        >pretty good. I'm not in the SCA, but I've toyed with joining.
        >
        >Ron
        >XVIIc Polish Pancerni
      • Ron Jachim
        The Jamestown ship s storage box shown on page 4 of The Toolbox Book is the basic design of what I had in mind. I ve also thought about a box like your link
        Message 3 of 3 , Feb 17, 2004
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          The Jamestown ship's storage box shown on page 4 of The Toolbox Book
          is the basic design of what I had in mind. I've also thought about a
          box like your link pointed me to with the raised legs. I'll look for
          Rednap's book the next time I'm at the library.

          Thanks,
          Ron
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