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Not quite sawdust - but involves glue & stain

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  • Siegfried
    Anyone s thoughts on this: http://kelly.dwarfworks.com/sca/cooler/ The effect is pretty decent I have to say. I ve been considering (for years) the idea of
    Message 1 of 17 , Jun 29, 2011
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      Anyone's thoughts on this:
      http://kelly.dwarfworks.com/sca/cooler/

      The effect is pretty decent I have to say.

      I've been considering (for years) the idea of making a 'box for a
      cooler'. But then I think about how coolers tend to 'die' around me,
      and when I bought a new cooler, it wouldn't work.

      And then I consider (for years) the idea of making my own chest cooler
      as I've seen many plans for. But that is always a bit of a 'big
      project'. Especially to insulate it correctly, make it waterproof, etc.
      And when opened they tend to look a little awkward.

      But this looks like a pretty interesting solution. And fun, who doesn't
      like playing with paper mache :)

      I wonder how well it will hold up.

      Siegfried

      --
      Barun Siegfried Sebastian Faust - Barony of Highland Foorde - Atlantia
      http://hf.atlantia.sca.org/ - http://crossbows.biz/ - http://eliw.com/
    • Jim Hart
      http://i147.photobucket.com/albums/r295/ConalOhAirt/SCA%20woodworking/Coolerchest1.jpg
      Message 2 of 17 , Jul 24, 2011
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        http://i147.photobucket.com/albums/r295/ConalOhAirt/SCA%20woodworking/Coolerchest1.jpg




        I built this one from scratch. I started with a plastic file box that have the correct proportions and 
        build the entire cooler. Sheet foam and expanding foam form the insulation. The plastic file box took the 
        problems of sealing it and totally bypassed them.

        Keeps stuff colder than ANY of the coolers I've bought.

        I made the wooden top to the chest  ( not the lid ) and squirted the foam into the cooler and quickly
        screwed the frame on so that the foam would expand into the gaps around the sheet foam.

        On Wed, Jun 29, 2011 at 12:59 PM, Siegfried <siegfried@...> wrote:
         

        Anyone's thoughts on this:
        http://kelly.dwarfworks.com/sca/cooler/

        The effect is pretty decent I have to say.

        I've been considering (for years) the idea of making a 'box for a
        cooler'. But then I think about how coolers tend to 'die' around me,
        and when I bought a new cooler, it wouldn't work.

        And then I consider (for years) the idea of making my own chest cooler
        as I've seen many plans for. But that is always a bit of a 'big
        project'. Especially to insulate it correctly, make it waterproof, etc.
        And when opened they tend to look a little awkward.

        But this looks like a pretty interesting solution. And fun, who doesn't
        like playing with paper mache :)

        I wonder how well it will hold up.

        Siegfried

        --
        Barun Siegfried Sebastian Faust - Barony of Highland Foorde - Atlantia
        http://hf.atlantia.sca.org/ - http://crossbows.biz/ - http://eliw.com/




        --
        Jim Hart
          Conal OhAirt

        Aude Aliquid Digmun - dare something worthy
      • Broom
        OK, I ll go even farther afield OT... Last year I dug a hole where my tent was about to be, at the edge, just big enough to hold two styrofoam coolers. Put
        Message 3 of 17 , Jul 24, 2011
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          OK, I'll go even farther afield OT...

          Last year I dug a hole where my tent was about to be, at the edge,
          just big enough to hold two styrofoam coolers. Put them in (with lids
          on), covered with a piece of plywood to make it safe to walk, and
          erected the tent.

          Since they were at the edge of the tent anyway, not much chance of me
          walking on it, but it's safe anyway.

          Kept cheese & sausage & homebrew ale in one; veggies & fruit in the
          other. Worked wonderfully, without ice.

          ' | PLEASE NOTE MY NEW ADDRESS, STARTING IN AUGUST:
          ' | Broom IAmBroom @ gmail . com
          ' | cellphone: 412-389-1997
          ' | 923 Haslage Ave, Pittsburgh, PA 15212
          '\|/ "It doesn't upset artists to find out that artists used lenses or
          '/|\ mirrors or other aids, but it certainly does upset the art
          //|\\ historians." - Chuck Close
        • maf@gleichen.ca
          A few years go I took some of the parts from an old water cooler that the chiller had died in and incorporated them into a barrel. Now it has a small tap at
          Message 4 of 17 , Jul 24, 2011
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            A few years go I took some of the parts from an old water cooler that the chiller had died in and incorporated them into a barrel. Now it has a small tap at the bottom and has room for a 5 gallon water jug in it so  I can have water on site. Of course that was pre-kids days so not much camping other than in a trailer now.
             
            From: Jim Hart
            Sent: Sunday, July 24, 2011 6:18 AM
            Subject: Re: [MedievalSawdust] Not quite sawdust - but involves glue & stain
             
             

            http://i147.photobucket.com/albums/r295/ConalOhAirt/SCA%20woodworking/Coolerchest1.jpg

             
             
             
             
            I built this one from scratch. I started with a plastic file box that have the correct proportions and
            build the entire cooler. Sheet foam and expanding foam form the insulation. The plastic file box took the
            problems of sealing it and totally bypassed them.
             
            Keeps stuff colder than ANY of the coolers I've bought.
             
            I made the wooden top to the chest  ( not the lid ) and squirted the foam into the cooler and quickly
            screwed the frame on so that the foam would expand into the gaps around the sheet foam.

            On Wed, Jun 29, 2011 at 12:59 PM, Siegfried <siegfried@...> wrote:
             

            Anyone's thoughts on this:
            http://kelly.dwarfworks.com/sca/cooler/

            The effect is pretty decent I have to say.

            I've been considering (for years) the idea of making a 'box for a
            cooler'. But then I think about how coolers tend to 'die' around me,
            and when I bought a new cooler, it wouldn't work.

            And then I consider (for years) the idea of making my own chest cooler
            as I've seen many plans for. But that is always a bit of a 'big
            project'. Especially to insulate it correctly, make it waterproof, etc.
            And when opened they tend to look a little awkward.

            But this looks like a pretty interesting solution. And fun, who doesn't
            like playing with paper mache :)

            I wonder how well it will hold up.

            Siegfried

            --
            Barun Siegfried Sebastian Faust - Barony of Highland Foorde - Atlantia
            http://hf.atlantia.sca.org/ - http://crossbows.biz/ - http://eliw.com/




            --
            Jim Hart
              Conal OhAirt
             
            Aude Aliquid Digmun - dare something worthy
          • avalonbear
            Broom what you basically built was a cold cellar. Before refrigeration was common in homes people had a spring house or a cold cellar/root cellar. the only
            Message 5 of 17 , Jul 26, 2011
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              Broom
              what you basically built was a cold cellar. Before refrigeration was common in homes people had a spring house or a cold cellar/root cellar. the only difference between the spring cellar and the cold cellar was water ran from the spring threw the cellar keeping the stones and every thing cold as the water was. I rebuilt one back in the 80's along the Boone trail near Cumberland gap. It had been in use from the time Dannel Boone first settled the region,by one of his woodsmen's family the Owens.My Grandmother was born in 1902 and the spring house was her grandfathers who was born in 1820. He rebuilt the spring house in 1854.
              And believe it or not it is still in use today.

              --- In medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com, Broom <IAmBroom@...> wrote:
              > OK, I'll go even farther afield OT...
              > Last year I dug a hole where my tent was about to be, at the edge,
              > just big enough to hold two styrofoam coolers. Put them in (with lids
              > on), covered with a piece of plywood to make it safe to walk, and
              > Kept cheese & sausage & homebrew ale in one; veggies & fruit in the
              > other. Worked wonderfully, without ice.
              ' | Broom
            • avalonbear
              Checking family records The first home that the Owens family built was on the upper cannon creek which is now Bell county KY approx 12 miles north of the
              Message 6 of 17 , Jul 26, 2011
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                Checking family records The first home that the Owens family built was on the upper cannon creek which is now Bell county KY approx 12 miles north of the Cumberland Gap.
                Family records say that the spring house was built first then the cabin. that was some time around the fall of 1785.

                --- In medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com, "avalonbear" <avalonbear@...> wrote:
                >
                > Broom
                > what you basically built was a cold cellar. Before refrigeration was common in homes people had a spring house or a cold cellar/root cellar. the only difference between the spring cellar and the cold cellar was water ran from the spring threw the cellar keeping the stones and every thing cold as the water was. I rebuilt one back in the 80's along the Boone trail near Cumberland gap. It had been in use from the time Dannel Boone first settled the region,by one of his woodsmen's family the Owens.My Grandmother was born in 1902 and the spring house was her grandfathers who was born in 1820. He rebuilt the spring house in 1854.
                > And believe it or not it is still in use today.
              • Julian Wilson
                From: avalonbear Broom what you basically built was a cold cellar. GOOD STUFF SNIPPED FOR BREVITY. My Grandmother was born in 1902 and
                Message 7 of 17 , Jul 27, 2011
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                  From: avalonbear <avalonbear@...>
                  Broom
                  what you basically built was a cold cellar.
                  GOOD STUFF SNIPPED FOR BREVITY.
                  My Grandmother was born in 1902 and the spring house was her grandfathers who was born in 1820. He rebuilt the spring house in 1854.
                  And believe it or not it is still in use today.

                  COMMENT
                  Nice one to post for us to enjoy, Avalon Bear.
                  "Old technology" is not neccessarily technology so old and obsolete  as to be unusable.
                  In England, during the 17th Century and afterwards, as the fashion for modernising great Country Houses grew and included "parking" on a grand scale, and the "gentle" and noble families became wealthy enough to do so, - many of those Owners who modernised their "Country Seats"  had "ice houses" constructed according to the "Roman Model" described in the "Classics" which were becoming more widely available in affordable book formats as the costs of publishing fell. 
                  A number of those "ice houses" remained in use right up to the invention and commercialisation of mechanical  refrigeration technology in the late19th/ early 20th centuries.
                  Both "English Heritage" and the UK's " National Trust" now have "historic houses" in their care where such ice houses are still extant, - and at a few of those houses, the "ice houses" are on view to the visiting Public.  I have had the pleasure of seeing at least three such, in the South of England.
                  So this is a technology that lasted in use, in the UK,  for at least 200 years after it's re-introduction began in the 17th century, - and went out of use only because an alternative, less-labour intensive method of producing ice out of season, for chilling and freezing, became available.
                   It's really pleasing to hear of a family "cold-cellar" still in use in the USA by the same family that had it built. That's "continuity of history", and a firm link with one's ancestors, for you.
                  Matthewe




                • Broom
                  ... True. But it amazes me how many people at Pennsic leave their coolers in the sun, instead of skipping ice and using passive means to keep items cool. Now,
                  Message 8 of 17 , Jul 27, 2011
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                    avalonbear:
                    > what you basically built was a cold cellar.

                    True. But it amazes me how many people at Pennsic leave their coolers
                    in the sun, instead of skipping ice and using passive means to keep
                    items cool.

                    Now, steak and bottled beer... that requires ice!

                    ' | PLEASE NOTE MY NEW ADDRESS, STARTING IN AUGUST:
                    ' | Broom IAmBroom @ gmail . com
                    ' | cellphone: 412-389-1997
                    ' | 923 Haslage Ave, Pittsburgh, PA 15212
                    '\|/ "My friends, he's not a / Socialist. But if he was, / How bad
                    '/|\ could it be?"
                    //|\\ - haiku by Cory on Obama/McCain 2008 election (ZeFrank.com)
                  • cochiolo
                    Try Thomas Moore 1800, he used the term refrigerator to describe a tub lined with rabbit fur with ice to keep items cold. A friend of mine made one (sorta)
                    Message 9 of 17 , Jul 28, 2011
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                      Try Thomas Moore 1800, he used the term refrigerator to describe a tub lined with rabbit fur with ice to keep items cold.
                      A friend of mine made one (sorta) using a 1/2 wine barrel and foam with a galvanized washtub inserted.  Bruce used rabbit fur to cover the foam and seal the lid.  The rabbit fur works like Velcro.  He does not use ice, he freezes meat first and then puts other perishables on top.  If he leaves it on the ground and in the shade, it keeps food from spoiling for 4 to 5 days.
                      It works and gets a lot of attention at reenactments.          Respectfully, Russ
                    • stolarz_fw
                      Greetings all, I am new to the group and have enjoyed readin your posts. I have recently built an ice chest of my own but was unable to attach a photo. Here is
                      Message 10 of 17 , Aug 6, 2011
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                        Greetings all,

                        I am new to the group and have enjoyed readin your posts.

                        I have recently built an ice chest of my own but was unable to attach a photo. Here is the link.

                        https://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.255447291150983.74942.192485694113810&saved#!/pages/Stolarz-fine-woodworking/192485694113810

                        --- In medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com, <maf@...> wrote:
                        >
                        > A few years go I took some of the parts from an old water cooler that the chiller had died in and incorporated them into a barrel. Now it has a small tap at the bottom and has room for a 5 gallon water jug in it so I can have water on site. Of course that was pre-kids days so not much camping other than in a trailer now.
                        >
                        > From: Jim Hart
                        > Sent: Sunday, July 24, 2011 6:18 AM
                        > To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
                        > Subject: Re: [MedievalSawdust] Not quite sawdust - but involves glue & stain
                        >
                        >
                        > http://i147.photobucket.com/albums/r295/ConalOhAirt/SCA%20woodworking/Coolerchest1.jpg
                        >
                        >
                        > http://i147.photobucket.com/albums/r295/ConalOhAirt/SCA%20woodworking/coolerchest3.jpg
                        >
                        > http://i147.photobucket.com/albums/r295/ConalOhAirt/SCA%20woodworking/coolerchest2.jpg
                        >
                        >
                        > I built this one from scratch. I started with a plastic file box that have the correct proportions and
                        > build the entire cooler. Sheet foam and expanding foam form the insulation. The plastic file box took the
                        > problems of sealing it and totally bypassed them.
                        >
                        > Keeps stuff colder than ANY of the coolers I've bought.
                        >
                        > I made the wooden top to the chest ( not the lid ) and squirted the foam into the cooler and quickly
                        > screwed the frame on so that the foam would expand into the gaps around the sheet foam.
                        >
                        >
                        > On Wed, Jun 29, 2011 at 12:59 PM, Siegfried <siegfried@...> wrote:
                        >
                        >
                        > Anyone's thoughts on this:
                        > http://kelly.dwarfworks.com/sca/cooler/
                        >
                        > The effect is pretty decent I have to say.
                        >
                        > I've been considering (for years) the idea of making a 'box for a
                        > cooler'. But then I think about how coolers tend to 'die' around me,
                        > and when I bought a new cooler, it wouldn't work.
                        >
                        > And then I consider (for years) the idea of making my own chest cooler
                        > as I've seen many plans for. But that is always a bit of a 'big
                        > project'. Especially to insulate it correctly, make it waterproof, etc.
                        > And when opened they tend to look a little awkward.
                        >
                        > But this looks like a pretty interesting solution. And fun, who doesn't
                        > like playing with paper mache :)
                        >
                        > I wonder how well it will hold up.
                        >
                        > Siegfried
                        >
                        > --
                        > Barun Siegfried Sebastian Faust - Barony of Highland Foorde - Atlantia
                        > http://hf.atlantia.sca.org/ - http://crossbows.biz/ - http://eliw.com/
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        > --
                        >
                        > Jim Hart
                        > Conal OhAirt
                        >
                        > Aude Aliquid Digmun - dare something worthy
                        >
                      • Geirfold
                        Looks nice, even incorporates a few ideas I had for one I plan on building. Did you angle the bottom just a bit toward the drain so it doesn t have to be
                        Message 11 of 17 , Aug 6, 2011
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                          Looks nice, even incorporates a few ideas I had for one I plan on building. Did you angle the bottom just a bit toward the drain so it doesn't have to be tilted to finish draining?

                          --- In medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com, "stolarz_fw" <victri_mc@...> wrote:
                          >
                          > Greetings all,
                          >
                          > I am new to the group and have enjoyed readin your posts.
                          >
                          > I have recently built an ice chest of my own but was unable to attach a photo. Here is the link.
                          >
                          > https://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.255447291150983.74942.192485694113810&saved#!/pages/Stolarz-fine-woodworking/192485694113810
                          >
                        • Bobby Bourgoin
                          Nice work… Bobby _____ From: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com [mailto:medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of stolarz_fw Sent: 6 août 2011 13:53 To:
                          Message 12 of 17 , Aug 7, 2011
                          • 0 Attachment

                            Nice work…

                             

                            Bobby

                             


                            From: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com [mailto: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com ] On Behalf Of stolarz_fw
                            Sent: 6 août 2011 13:53
                            To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
                            Subject: [MedievalSawdust] Re: Not quite sawdust - but involves glue & stain

                             

                             

                            Greetings all,

                            I am new to the group and have enjoyed readin your posts.

                            I have recently built an ice chest of my own but was unable to attach a photo. Here is the link.

                            https://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.255447291150983.74942.192485694113810&saved#!/pages/Stolarz-fine-woodworking/192485694113810

                            --- In medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com, <maf@...> wrote:

                            >
                            > A few years go I took some of the parts from an old water cooler that the
                            chiller had died in and incorporated them into a barrel. Now it has a small tap at the bottom and has room for a 5 gallon water jug in it so I can have water on site. Of course that was pre-kids days so not much camping other than in a trailer now.
                            >
                            > From: Jim Hart
                            > Sent: Sunday, July 24, 2011 6:18 AM
                            > To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
                            > Subject: Re: [MedievalSawdust] Not quite sawdust - but involves glue &
                            stain
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            href="http://i147.photobucket.com/albums/r295/ConalOhAirt/SCA%20woodworking/Coolerchest1.jpg">http://i147.photobucket.com/albums/r295/ConalOhAirt/SCA%20woodworking/Coolerchest1.jpg
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            href="http://i147.photobucket.com/albums/r295/ConalOhAirt/SCA%20woodworking/coolerchest3.jpg">http://i147.photobucket.com/albums/r295/ConalOhAirt/SCA%20woodworking/coolerchest3.jpg
                            >
                            >
                            href="http://i147.photobucket.com/albums/r295/ConalOhAirt/SCA%20woodworking/coolerchest2.jpg">http://i147.photobucket.com/albums/r295/ConalOhAirt/SCA%20woodworking/coolerchest2.jpg
                            >
                            >
                            > I built this one from scratch. I started with a plastic file box that have
                            the correct proportions and
                            > build the entire cooler. Sheet foam and expanding foam form the
                            insulation. The plastic file box took the
                            > problems of sealing it and totally bypassed them.
                            >
                            > Keeps stuff colder than ANY of the coolers I've bought.
                            >
                            > I made the wooden top to the chest ( not the lid ) and squirted the foam
                            into the cooler and quickly
                            > screwed the frame on so that the foam would expand into the gaps around
                            the sheet foam.
                            >
                            >
                            > On Wed, Jun 29, 2011 at 12:59 PM, Siegfried <siegfried@...> wrote:
                            >
                            >
                            > Anyone's thoughts on this:
                            > http://kelly.dwarfworks.com/sca/cooler/
                            >
                            > The effect is pretty decent I have to say.
                            >
                            > I've been considering (for years) the idea of making a 'box for a
                            > cooler'. But then I think about how coolers tend to 'die' around me,
                            > and when I bought a new cooler, it wouldn't work.
                            >
                            > And then I consider (for years) the idea of making my own chest cooler
                            > as I've seen many plans for. But that is always a bit of a 'big
                            > project'. Especially to insulate it correctly, make it waterproof, etc.
                            > And when opened they tend to look a little awkward.
                            >
                            > But this looks like a pretty interesting solution. And fun, who doesn't
                            > like playing with paper mache :)
                            >
                            > I wonder how well it will hold up.
                            >
                            > Siegfried
                            >
                            > --
                            > Barun Siegfried Sebastian Faust - Barony of Highland
                            Foorde - Atlantia
                            > http://hf.atlantia.sca.org/ -
                            href="http://crossbows.biz/">http://crossbows.biz/ - http://eliw.com/
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            > --
                            >
                            > Jim Hart
                            > Conal OhAirt
                            >
                            > Aude Aliquid Digmun - dare something worthy
                            >

                          • lorderec
                            I used to do this at pennsic as well (a real cooler not styrofoam) and got through the whole week on one block of ice...
                            Message 13 of 17 , Aug 21, 2011
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                              I used to do this at pennsic as well (a real cooler not styrofoam) and got through the whole week on one block of ice...

                              --- In medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com, Broom <IAmBroom@...> wrote:
                              >
                              > avalonbear:
                              > > what you basically built was a cold cellar.
                              >
                              > True. But it amazes me how many people at Pennsic leave their coolers
                              > in the sun, instead of skipping ice and using passive means to keep
                              > items cool.
                              >
                              > Now, steak and bottled beer... that requires ice!
                              >
                              > ' | PLEASE NOTE MY NEW ADDRESS, STARTING IN AUGUST:
                              > ' | Broom IAmBroom @ gmail . com
                              > ' | cellphone: 412-389-1997
                              > ' | 923 Haslage Ave, Pittsburgh, PA 15212
                              > '\|/ "My friends, he's not a / Socialist. But if he was, / How bad
                              > '/|\ could it be?"
                              > //|\\ - haiku by Cory on Obama/McCain 2008 election (ZeFrank.com)
                              >
                            • Scot Eddy
                              We have a 4 x8 sheet of what my wife calls bendy board. It was in the house when I married her so all I know is that she calls it bendy board . I bends very
                              Message 14 of 17 , Nov 8, 2011
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                                We have a 4'x8' sheet of what my wife calls bendy board. It was in the house when I married her so all I know is that she calls it 'bendy board'. I bends very well in one direction. I could make a cylinder 8' in circumference and 4' tall. It will also let me bend it in a ripple.

                                It's not a laminate like ply wood, but it looks like pieces of wood have been glued edge to edge to make up the 8' length.

                                A) Does anyone know the name of this material?

                                B) Wife said it was "worth a lot of money", is this true?

                                C) Is it worth keeping?

                                Thanks,

                                Jovian Skleros

                              • leaking pen
                                its reffered to as bending stock, or rolling stock. It has its uses not particularly valuable, no. hard to get these days though.
                                Message 15 of 17 , Nov 8, 2011
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                                  its reffered to as bending stock, or rolling stock.

                                  It has its uses

                                  not particularly valuable, no. hard to get these days though.

                                  On Tue, Nov 8, 2011 at 2:23 PM, Scot Eddy <mister_eddy2003@...> wrote:
                                   

                                  We have a 4'x8' sheet of what my wife calls bendy board. It was in the house when I married her so all I know is that she calls it 'bendy board'. I bends very well in one direction. I could make a cylinder 8' in circumference and 4' tall. It will also let me bend it in a ripple.

                                  It's not a laminate like ply wood, but it looks like pieces of wood have been glued edge to edge to make up the 8' length.

                                  A) Does anyone know the name of this material?

                                  B) Wife said it was "worth a lot of money", is this true?

                                  C) Is it worth keeping?

                                  Thanks,

                                  Jovian Skleros


                                • Jim Hart
                                  Sometimes called wacky wood too..... VERY useful if you need it Not good for much else than when you are building something with a curved face. You have to
                                  Message 16 of 17 , Nov 8, 2011
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                                    Sometimes called wacky wood too.....

                                    VERY useful if you need it Not good for much else than when you are building something with a curved
                                    face. You have to veneer or laminate it before you do anything else with it, even if you just want to paint it


                                    ..... Never tried to buy it for personal use....
                                    I use it at work often..... 

                                    On Tue, Nov 8, 2011 at 4:26 PM, leaking pen <itsatrap@...> wrote:
                                     

                                    its reffered to as bending stock, or rolling stock.

                                    It has its uses

                                    not particularly valuable, no. hard to get these days though.


                                    On Tue, Nov 8, 2011 at 2:23 PM, Scot Eddy <mister_eddy2003@...> wrote:
                                     

                                    We have a 4'x8' sheet of what my wife calls bendy board. It was in the house when I married her so all I know is that she calls it 'bendy board'. I bends very well in one direction. I could make a cylinder 8' in circumference and 4' tall. It will also let me bend it in a ripple.

                                    It's not a laminate like ply wood, but it looks like pieces of wood have been glued edge to edge to make up the 8' length.

                                    A) Does anyone know the name of this material?

                                    B) Wife said it was "worth a lot of money", is this true?

                                    C) Is it worth keeping?

                                    Thanks,

                                    Jovian Skleros





                                    --
                                    Jim Hart
                                      Conal OhAirt

                                    Aude Aliquid Digmun - dare something worthy
                                  • nelsonhaynes@aol.com
                                    I muse it to trim 1/4 moon windows. It is as weak as a kitten and only good for looks. If you need a curved surface, it works well. I get mine from Vandyke s
                                    Message 17 of 17 , Nov 8, 2011
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                                      I muse it to trim 1/4 moon windows. It is as weak as a kitten and only good for looks. If you need a curved surface, it works well. I get mine from Vandyke's Restorers.
                                       
                                      In a message dated 11/8/2011 8:00:29 P.M. Eastern Standard Time, conalohairt@... writes:
                                       

                                      Sometimes called wacky wood too.....


                                      VERY useful if you need it Not good for much else than when you are building something with a curved
                                      face. You have to veneer or laminate it before you do anything else with it, even if you just want to paint it


                                      ..... Never tried to buy it for personal use....
                                      I use it at work often..... 

                                      On Tue, Nov 8, 2011 at 4:26 PM, leaking pen <itsatrap@...> wrote:
                                       

                                      its reffered to as bending stock, or rolling stock.

                                      It has its uses

                                      not particularly valuable, no. hard to get these days though.


                                      On Tue, Nov 8, 2011 at 2:23 PM, Scot Eddy <mister_eddy2003@...> wrote:
                                       

                                      We have a 4'x8' sheet of what my wife calls bendy board. It was in the house when I married her so all I know is that she calls it 'bendy board'. I bends very well in one direction. I could make a cylinder 8' in circumference and 4' tall. It will also let me bend it in a ripple.

                                      It's not a laminate like ply wood, but it looks like pieces of wood have been glued edge to edge to make up the 8' length.

                                      A) Does anyone know the name of this material?

                                      B) Wife said it was "worth a lot of money", is this true?

                                      C) Is it worth keeping?

                                      Thanks,

                                      Jovian Skleros





                                      --
                                      Jim Hart
                                        Conal OhAirt

                                      Aude Aliquid Digmun - dare something worthy

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