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Re: [MedievalSawdust] Oily rags and risk

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  • AlbionWood
    The water will absorb much of the heat, preventing combustion. (the heat that would otherwise cause the temperature to rise, will instead go into evaporating
    Message 1 of 24 , Jun 14, 2011
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      The water will absorb much of the heat, preventing combustion. (the
      heat that would otherwise cause the temperature to rise, will instead go
      into evaporating some of the water.) Putting them in the fireproof
      metal container is wise anyway!

      Cheers,
      Tim

      On 6/14/2011 4:12 PM, kelly O'Sullivan wrote:
      >
      >
      > Thanks for the discotion everyone. This is why I love this group there
      > are so many knolageable people that can awncer questions for lowly
      > apprentices like myself.
      > The question resulted from a dumpster fire at my shop someone put rags
      > still wet with linseed oil into our garbge dumpster and a fire resulted.
      > At the next morining meeting our shop manger said you should dip the
      > rags in water then put them in the rags continer (it is a fire proof
      > metal contaior). I was wondering about the water thing because I was
      > always tought to let the rags dry.
      > Kelly
      >
    • Graham Eyre
      The will be no problem if the rag is opened out and allowed to dry say over the vice or other metal object. This way no heat is caused. Once dry there is no
      Message 2 of 24 , Jun 14, 2011
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        The will be no problem if the rag is opened out and allowed to dry say over the vice or other metal object. This way no heat is caused. Once dry there is no problem and can be thrown away as normal, I usually leave my rags to dry overnight. The heat only comes when rag or rags are screwed or scrunched up and thrown away when still wet, especially when mixed with other inflammable materials. If still worried then put the rag / rags in a metal container [bucket] filled with water is a definite must.
         
        Cheers
         
        Graham

        From: AlbionWood <albionwood@...>
        To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Wednesday, 15 June 2011 4:13 PM
        Subject: Re: [MedievalSawdust] Oily rags and risk

        The water will absorb much of the heat, preventing combustion.  (the
        heat that would otherwise cause the temperature to rise, will instead go
        into evaporating some of the water.)  Putting them in the fireproof
        metal container is wise anyway!

        Cheers,
        Tim

        On 6/14/2011 4:12 PM, kelly O'Sullivan wrote:
        >
        >
        > Thanks for the discotion everyone. This is why I love this group there
        > are so many knolageable people that can awncer questions for lowly
        > apprentices like myself.
        > The question resulted from a dumpster fire at my shop someone put rags
        > still wet with linseed oil into our garbge dumpster and a fire resulted.
        > At the next morining meeting our shop manger said you should dip the
        > rags in water then put them in the rags continer (it is a fire proof
        > metal contaior). I was wondering about the water thing because I was
        > always tought to let the rags dry.
        > Kelly
        >


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      • Jeffrey Johnson
        I know someone who had his house burn down because of oily rags. Me, I have an ash can with a lid and locking handle. I drape rags and paper towels when I can
        Message 3 of 24 , Jun 15, 2011
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          I know someone who had his house burn down because of oily rags.

          Me, I have an ash can with a lid and locking handle. I drape rags and paper towels when I can and when a rag goes into the can, its spread out so it doesn't wad up and create a mass or wad.

          On Jun 15, 2011 2:42 AM, "Graham Eyre" <geyre@...> wrote:
          >
          >  
          >
          > The will be no problem if the rag is opened out and allowed to dry say over the vice or other metal object. This way no heat is caused. Once dry there is no problem and can be thrown away as normal, I usually leave my rags to dry overnight. The heat only comes when rag or rags are screwed or scrunched up and thrown away when still wet, especially when mixed with other inflammable materials. If still worried then put the rag / rags in a metal container [bucket] filled with water is a definite must.
          >  
          > Cheers
          >  
          > Graham
          >
          > From: AlbionWood <albionwood@...>
          > To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
          > Sent: Wednesday, 15 June 2011 4:13 PM
          > Subject: Re: [MedievalSawdust] Oily rags and risk
          >
          > The water will absorb much of the heat, preventing combustion.  (the
          > heat that would otherwise cause the temperature to rise, will instead go
          > into evaporating some of the water.)  Putting them in the fireproof
          > metal container is wise anyway!
          >
          > Cheers,
          > Tim
          >
          > On 6/14/2011 4:12 PM, kelly O'Sullivan wrote:
          > >
          > >
          > > Thanks for the discotion everyone. This is why I love this group there
          > > are so many knolageable people that can awncer questions for lowly
          > > apprentices like myself.
          > > The question resulted from a dumpster fire at my shop someone put rags
          > > still wet with linseed oil into our garbge dumpster and a fire resulted.
          > > At the next morining meeting our shop manger said you should dip the
          > > rags in water then put them in the rags continer (it is a fire proof
          > > metal contaior). I was wondering about the water thing because I was
          > > always tought to let the rags dry.
          > > Kelly
          > >
          >
          >
          > ------------------------------------
          >
          >
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        • tessa_rat
          The closest I ve come was a slightly less than fist-sized lump of linseed oil soaked paper towels that I left on my finishing table while continuing to finish
          Message 4 of 24 , Jun 20, 2011
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            The closest I've come was a slightly less than fist-sized lump of linseed oil soaked paper towels that I left on my finishing table while continuing to finish other pieces. When cleaning up an hour later I broke up the lump so that it could dry flat and discovered that it was hot and scorched on the inside. That served as a nice reminder not to get complacent!

            I don't like the solution of storing oily rags in water because it doesn't really solve the problem, only postpones it. Since the oil won't cure under water, you still have oily rags, only now you are collecting more and more of them in one spot. Granted, as long as they stay under water there will be no problems, but eventually you will need to actually dispose of them. Drying them is easy if you only have to do a little at a time.

            Gene "Fritz" Eisele
            welldressedtent.com
          • Broom
            Thank you to ALL who ve supplied their personal horror stories. The risk of coal & charcoal tar-gas release is often overstated - huge shipping containers of
            Message 5 of 24 , Jun 21, 2011
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              Thank you to ALL who've supplied their personal horror stories.

              The risk of coal & charcoal tar-gas release is often overstated - huge
              shipping containers of coal only steam in the rain. That led me to
              believe initially that this risk was also minimal.

              However, oily rags are clearly orders of magnitude riskier!

              ' | Broom IAmBroom @ gmail . com
              ' | cellphone: 412-389-1997
              '\|/ 9370 Shadduck Rd, McKean, PA 16426
              '/|\ "Discere et docere", which means:
              //|\\ "Aquaman isn't gay, but he is into watersports." - Fano, Fark
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