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Re: RE: [MedievalSawdust] Re: Request to join medievalsawdust approved

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  • patsmith
    One of the artisans who will be demonstrating and teaching on Artisan s Row during the woodworking exhibit is a cooper with many years of experience both in
    Message 1 of 11 , May 2, 2011
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      One of the artisans who will be demonstrating and teaching
      on Artisan's Row during the woodworking exhibit is a cooper
      with many years of experience both in the SCA and outside
      making barrels. Oddly enough, no furniture maker has
      committed definitely to being there, although a few have
      tentatively expressed interest.

      I don't understand the comments about judging - if they are
      refering to Artisan's Row at Pennsic, there is a basic
      misunderstanding of what goes on there. The point of
      artisan's row at Pennsic is to have a day-long exhibit and
      demonstration of a craft where various artisans can come and
      demo their art for the public, hopefully letting the
      populace see just how much fun the craft can be. It's a
      chance to get together with others who do the same art, swap
      techniques and stories, and show off. No one is expected to
      be there the whole day - stop by and play for as long as you
      have the time.

      Woodworking is scheduled for Wednesday of War week, so the
      only war-point activity it conflicts with is the Archery
      Champion's shoot.

      Brusten

      ----- Original Message Follows -----
      From: Jeffrey Johnson <jljonsn@...>
      To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: Re: RE: [MedievalSawdust] Re: Request to join
      medievalsawdust approved
      Date: Sun, 1 May 2011 20:09:43 -0400

      > This would apply to most areas - sexay objects get
      > attention, even if historically inappropriate, wrong
      > materials, wrong technique, and the item would never have
      > existed in the time period portrayed.
      >
      > For judging, it depends on who's doing the judging.
      > Problems arise when the judging panels are drawn from
      > people who aren't well versed in the area, so you get that
      > aattention paid to the gaudy and shoddy over well-built
      > and appropriate. Not a big pool to draw from for
      > woodworking, I could count those I would consider adequate
      > judges in Atlantia on one hand, and its hit-n-miss to get
      > them to attend and judge.
      >
      > Jeff
      >
      > On May 1, 2011 6:14 PM, "D. Young"
      > <furnaceplans@...> wrote: >
      > >
      > >
      > > As a thought for mulling over...
      > >
      > > One of the problems I have noticed with the laurelite
      > approach and with merchant juries is that they often do
      > not account for every day objects but rather the
      > wow-factor for swanky things. >
      > > Archeology and extant items tell us that a great many
      > period things were in fact pretty ordinary, maybe even
      > bland or boring. Armour and clothing, by far the most
      > celebrated things in the sca are often viewed as "puting
      > your best foot forward items" where as many utilitarian
      > objects that have no real wow-value and might even be
      > fairly rough tend to be less appealing than just
      > furniture. A well made butter churn, made with period
      > tools and lathe hoops aint pretty but it works. A
      > simple laundry battle is hardly that much of a big deal,
      > but it helped a lot. A basic cutting board or wooden
      > handled tool might not seem like a big deal but they often
      > represent a lot of time learning the craft using period
      > tools and period woods. >
      > > I might propose, for the sake of period woodworking that
      > furniture be only one category of woodenwares....and that
      > there be some openness for the more mundane and boring of
      > items that by far, had more utilitarian and practical
      > every day uses than a gorgeous chest or Glastonbury chair.
      > > > Barrels.....lord have mercy....just coopering with
      > period tools/techniques is a hell of a craft to master.
      > Ive dont just enough to realize how easy it is to screw up
      > without modern tools. >
      > > And while a barrel does not usually draw the crowds
      > attention like a fine gothic chest, a barrel is such a
      > fundamental part of the basic economy that such things
      > should not be forgotten or overlooked. >
      > > cheers
      > > Drew
      > >
      > > ________________________________
      > >
      > >>>>> Fine Armour and Historical Reproductions
      > >>>>>
      > >>>>> Custom Commissions Welcome....!
      > >>>>>
      > >>>>> www.partsandtechnical.com
      > >>>>> (Well Formed Munitions Catalog Coming This Spring)
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > ________________________________
      > > To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
      > > From: pennsicartisans@...
      > > Date: Thu, 28 Apr 2011 21:04:41 -0400
      > >
      > > Subject: [MedievalSawdust] Re: Request to join
      > medievalsawdust approved >
      > >
      > > Greetings unto the Members of the Medieval Sawdust Group
      > , >
      > > I am Fiadnata ó Gleann Àlainn, the coordinator for
      > Artisans Row at Pennsic 40. I have had Woodworking
      > proposed as a possible day on Artisans Row, so I am now in
      > search of other woodworkers to help fill the tent for a
      > full day. >
      > > If anyone is interested in participating, please e-mail
      > me off-list at pennsic artisans @ gmail. com (take out all
      > spaces), and I will put you in touch with the organizer of
      > the Day. >
      > > Thank you for any help you may be able to provide.
      > Please excuse this intrusion into the discussions on your
      > list -- they all look interesting! (You need to see my
      > Warp-Weighted Loom to understand how much I appreciate
      > playing with wood!) >
      > > --
      > > In Service,
      > >
      > > Fiadnata ó Gleann Àlainn
      > > Dean of the School of Applied Arts (Artisans Row)
      > > Pennsic University
      > >
      > >
      > >
      >
    • conradh@efn.org
      ... When I got mine, right after I swore fealty, the Queen said, I really like your tent stakes. So, yes, daily life objects can be appreciated too. Having
      Message 2 of 11 , May 3, 2011
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        > Don't know where you live, but around here the laurelite approach is
        > toward well
        > made everyday objects. We are much more interested in that cool spring
        > pole
        > lathe and the well stitched seam than ooogles of googas.
        >
        > For instance, we currently have two people on vigil to be elevated to the
        > order
        > of the Laurel later this month. One's main skills are making woodworking
        > tools(well) and then using them(also well). And the other is for Norse
        > lifestyle
        > stuff. She researched pigments used for dying sails, made sieves of hair,
        > and
        > other such things.
        >
        When I got mine, right after I swore fealty, the Queen said, "I really
        like your tent stakes."

        So, yes, daily life objects can be appreciated too. Having the royal
        pavilion stay up on a stormy night helps.

        Ulfhedinn
      • i_odlin@hotmail.com
        ... Indeed. This is why I don t usually bother entering competitions. The last time I did, I received a judging slip that literally consisted of two words:
        Message 3 of 11 , May 6, 2011
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          --- On Mon, 2/5/11, Jeffrey Johnson <jljonsn@...> wrote:
          > This would apply to most areas - sexay objects get attention [...]

          Indeed. This is why I don't usually bother entering competitions. The last time I did, I received a judging slip that literally consisted of two words: "Too plain."

          Maybe there were people who enjoyed my simple, made entirely with hand tools chest. If so, they remained silent.

          I haven't bothered entering a competition since.

          -Iain
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