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Re: [MedievalSawdust] Advice on table saw

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  • Julian Wilson
    Kevlar-armoured working gloves are also a good idea. I have forgotten who sells them - but I know some Merchants DO list them in their catalogues.  Julian
    Message 1 of 22 , Apr 25, 2011
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      Kevlar-armoured working gloves are also a good idea. I have forgotten who sells them - but I know some Merchants DO list them in their catalogues.

       Julian Wilson.

      --- On Mon, 25/4/11, Isabelle LaFar <isabelle@...> wrote:

      From: Isabelle LaFar <isabelle@...>
      Subject: Re: [MedievalSawdust] Advice on table saw
      To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
      Date: Monday, 25 April, 2011, 12:00

       

      I've never used the guard on my table saw. It gets in the way. ;)

      I do, however, wear a face shield rather than plain old safety glasses. Wood chips and sawdust do not aim for the eyes only, and sting when they hit your face. Also, the face shield does not tend to fog up like safety glasses do.
      Don't touch a moving blade, use a push stick, and make sure your work is balanced.

      --Isabelle
    • powell.sean@comcast.net
           And on this we will need to agree to disagree.      Rotating cutting tools can cut but they can also grab. If it grabs it will pull you deeper and
      Message 2 of 22 , Apr 25, 2011
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             And on this we will need to agree to disagree.

             Rotating cutting tools can cut but they can also grab. If it grabs it will pull you deeper and cut more. If it gets bad it will grab, pull, cut, and mangle. The best defense mechanism is seperating the limb from the tool. I do not want to have to break kevar strands while doing so. I have cut myself ONCE on my table-saw. A scrape 1/8" wide, 1/16" deep and less then a 1/4" long in my thumb because I was not using proper safety precautions of a push stick but following the golden rule about blade exposure. I made my second saving throw by turning the blade off, bandaging and THEN completing the cut with a push-stick.

             Now I do wear tight, thin leather gloves when working with my buffer and grinder. I scrape my knuckles frequently and end up grabbing hot metal more often then I would like but I've removed the guards from my grinder as well and the buffer is completely exposed. If something catches there is nothing to get pinched against and pulled into.

             I'll wear kevlar gloves for carving or chiseling but not for power-tools. If you decide to wear them that's your choice.

         

        Sean


        ----- Original Message -----
        From: "Julian Wilson" <lhjw66576@...>
        To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Monday, April 25, 2011 8:13:14 AM
        Subject: Re: [MedievalSawdust] Advice on table saw



        Kevlar-armoured working gloves are also a good idea. I have forgotten who sells them - but I know some Merchants DO list them in their catalogues.

         Julian Wilson.

        --- On Mon, 25/4/11, Isabelle LaFar <isabelle@...> wrote:

        From: Isabelle LaFar <isabelle@...>
        Subject: Re: [MedievalSawdust] Advice on table saw
        To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
        Date: Monday, 25 April, 2011, 12:00

         

        I've never used the guard on my table saw. It gets in the way. ;)

        I do, however, wear a face shield rather than plain old safety glasses. Wood chips and sawdust do not aim for the eyes only, and sting when they hit your face. Also, the face shield does not tend to fog up like safety glasses do.
        Don't touch a moving blade, use a push stick, and make sure your work is balanced.

        --Isabelle


      • Bobby Bourgoin (Robert du Bourg)
        If you ve never worked with a table saw. Like all other power tools, take it SLOW, PRACTICE, use the GUARDS whenever possible (I often take mine on and off, I
        Message 3 of 22 , Apr 25, 2011
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          If you’ve never worked with a table saw…  Like all other power tools, take it SLOW, PRACTICE, use the GUARDS whenever possible (I often take mine on and off, I know it’s a pain sometimes, but it’s worth the hassle), PUSHSTICKS, PROTECT the eyes and ears (if noise is high) (face-shields are nice to have), keep your work area CLEAN both floor and table (tripping or sliding on a small stray piece of wood with the saw turning can be scary at the least).  Keep your mind on what you are doing, and if in doubt STOP!!!  Don’t wear loose clothing, and keep hair tied back (if you have long hair of course…) Work in well lit areas (use extra light if need-be).

           

          Bobby

           


          From: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com [mailto: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com ] On Behalf Of Royce
          Sent: 25 avril 2011 00:21
          To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: [MedievalSawdust] Advice on table saw

           

           

          Hello all,

           

          I’ve lurked around for a long while here, figuring one day I’ll finally start getting tools together to do woodworking. 

           

          My primary goal  is to be able to build decent, durable chests and chairs that look a lot more period than my folding metal garden chairs and plastic totes…

           

          I just picked up a craftsman 10” 2.5 developed hp (137.248760 model) 5000 rpm no-load speed table saw for $40 last weekend.  It runs, the guy I bought it from plugged it in and ran it in front of me to check.  I’ve taken it home, blown it out with air from the compressor, and hit the adjusting screws with wd-40.

           

          However, it didn’t have the blade guard, and it didn’t have either the fence or the miter.  I do not intend on operating it until I have at the very least the blade guard.  It also didn’t have the manual, but that’s only $9.99 from Sears.

           

          I guess my question is, would it be recommended for me to shop Sears for the parts I need, namely the guard and fence, or is there a better source for the parts elsewhere?  Also, aside from don’t stick your fingers in the running blade, what other advice would there be for a starting table saw worker.

           

          Bercilak

           

        • Broom
          ... Despite appearances and common beliefs, WD-40 is not a lubricant - it is a Water Dispersant. It evaporates slowly, and accumulates dust particles while
          Message 4 of 22 , Apr 25, 2011
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            > home, blown it out with air from the compressor, and hit the adjusting
            > screws with wd-40.

            Despite appearances and common beliefs, WD-40 is not a lubricant - it
            is a Water Dispersant. It evaporates slowly, and accumulates dust
            particles while wet, so that eventually it leaves the area more gritty
            than it was before you used it!

            This is easily fixed, however. Get a can of penetrating oil (or
            ordinary general-purpose oil), and drop a drop on each spot you hit
            with the WD-40. The oil will mix in, and continue lubricating after
            the WD-40 is gone in a few weeks or months.

            > least the blade guard.  It also didn't have the manual, but that's only
            > $9.99 from Sears.

            Or free for download here:
            www.hammerwall.com/Download_Manual/123545/

            > I guess my question is, would it be recommended for me to shop Sears for the
            > parts I need, namely the guard and fence, or is there a better source for

            The fence is fairly generic; you can certainly get one that fits this
            model from other companies. The guard is more likely a Sears-only
            product, but you never know. Nothing wrong with getting either of
            these from 3rd-party vendors; they won't affect precision of your work
            at all. Check ebay first, but go armed with the knowledge of what
            Sears wants for the new, brand-name parts.

            ' | Broom IAmBroom @ gmail . com
            ' | cellphone: 412-389-1997
            ' | 9370 Shadduck Rd, McKean, PA 16426
            ' | "Discere et docere", which means:
            '\|/ "C S Lewis' original working title was, 'The Lion, the Witch and
            '/|\ my Sister's Underwear Drawer'."
            //|\\ - props to farleftside, gocomics.com/Lio
          • Julian Wilson
            Sean, Oh - I don t use the kevlar-armoured gloves when running my tablesaw - I have a friend who makes maille.  I got  him to make me a pair of maille gloves
            Message 5 of 22 , Apr 25, 2011
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              Sean,
              Oh - I don't use the kevlar-armoured gloves when running my tablesaw - I have a friend who makes maille.
               I got  him to make me a pair of maille gloves on leather bases for the tablesaw and spindle-moulder work, and I use all the varieties of pushstick & push-pad, as well..  But a friend who'll make you maille gloves is not going to be available to most pro-woodwork-shop  users.
              I use the kevlar-armoured gloves I got as a gift  for the rest of my edged-tooling shop work; - these replace the cowhide work gloves I used to use, but which wore out too fast on all the pressure/abrasion points. The kevlar-amroured gloves are showing wear, but are nowhere-near wearing out yet; Over the period I've been using them, I would have [based on previous experience - 8 or 9 pairs of the cowhide glives - and at nearly GB£9 per pair for the cowhide, that's quite a saving on the capital outlay for " consumable safety equipment"

              rgeards,
               Julian

              --- On Mon, 25/4/11, powell.sean@... <powell.sean@...> wrote:

              From: powell.sean@... <powell.sean@...>
              Subject: Re: [MedievalSawdust] Advice on table saw
              To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
              Date: Monday, 25 April, 2011, 13:08

               

                   And on this we will need to agree to disagree.

                   Rotating cutting tools can cut but they can also grab. If it grabs it will pull you deeper and cut more. If it gets bad it will grab, pull, cut, and mangle. The best defense mechanism is seperating the limb from the tool. I do not want to have to break kevar strands while doing so. I have cut myself ONCE on my table-saw. A scrape 1/8" wide, 1/16" deep and less then a 1/4" long in my thumb because I was not using proper safety precautions of a push stick but following the golden rule about blade exposure. I made my second saving throw by turning the blade off, bandaging and THEN completing the cut with a push-stick.

                   Now I do wear tight, thin leather gloves when working with my buffer and grinder. I scrape my knuckles frequently and end up grabbing hot metal more often then I would like but I've removed the guards from my grinder as well and the buffer is completely exposed. If something catches there is nothing to get pinched against and pulled into.

                   I'll wear kevlar gloves for carving or chiseling but not for power-tools. If you decide to wear them that's your choice.

               

              Sean


              ----- Original Message -----
              From: "Julian Wilson" <lhjw66576@...>
              To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
              Sent: Monday, April 25, 2011 8:13:14 AM
              Subject: Re: [MedievalSawdust] Advice on table saw



              Kevlar-armoured working gloves are also a good idea. I have forgotten who sells them - but I know some Merchants DO list them in their catalogues.

               Julian Wilson.

              --- On Mon, 25/4/11, Isabelle LaFar <isabelle@...> wrote:

              From: Isabelle LaFar <isabelle@...>
              Subject: Re: [MedievalSawdust] Advice on table saw
              To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
              Date: Monday, 25 April, 2011, 12:00

               

              I've never used the guard on my table saw. It gets in the way. ;)

              I do, however, wear a face shield rather than plain old safety glasses. Wood chips and sawdust do not aim for the eyes only, and sting when they hit your face. Also, the face shield does not tend to fog up like safety glasses do.
              Don't touch a moving blade, use a push stick, and make sure your work is balanced.

              --Isabelle


            • Barekr Silfri
              There are some great woodworking podcasts out there. One that came to mind was The Wood Whisperer, he has a couple podcasts on tuning up the table saw
              Message 6 of 22 , Apr 25, 2011
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                There are some great woodworking podcasts out there. One that came to mind was The Wood Whisperer, he has a couple podcasts on tuning up the table saw (episodes 55 and 56). you can find him on itunes or check out his website. www.thewoodwhisperer.com. Not only does Marc Spagnuolo offer up great info and projects he is fun to watch too.

                Barekr "Bear" Silfri

                On Mon, Apr 25, 2011 at 10:49 AM, Julian Wilson <lhjw66576@...> wrote:
                 

                Sean,
                Oh - I don't use the kevlar-armoured gloves when running my tablesaw - I have a friend who makes maille.
                 I got  him to make me a pair of maille gloves on leather bases for the tablesaw and spindle-moulder work, and I use all the varieties of pushstick & push-pad, as well..  But a friend who'll make you maille gloves is not going to be available to most pro-woodwork-shop  users.
                I use the kevlar-armoured gloves I got as a gift  for the rest of my edged-tooling shop work; - these replace the cowhide work gloves I used to use, but which wore out too fast on all the pressure/abrasion points. The kevlar-amroured gloves are showing wear, but are nowhere-near wearing out yet; Over the period I've been using them, I would have [based on previous experience - 8 or 9 pairs of the cowhide glives - and at nearly GB£9 per pair for the cowhide, that's quite a saving on the capital outlay for " consumable safety equipment"

                rgeards,
                 Julian

                --- On Mon, 25/4/11, powell.sean@... <powell.sean@...> wrote:

                From: powell.sean@... <powell.sean@...>

                Subject: Re: [MedievalSawdust] Advice on table saw
                To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
                Date: Monday, 25 April, 2011, 13:08


                 

                     And on this we will need to agree to disagree.

                     Rotating cutting tools can cut but they can also grab. If it grabs it will pull you deeper and cut more. If it gets bad it will grab, pull, cut, and mangle. The best defense mechanism is seperating the limb from the tool. I do not want to have to break kevar strands while doing so. I have cut myself ONCE on my table-saw. A scrape 1/8" wide, 1/16" deep and less then a 1/4" long in my thumb because I was not using proper safety precautions of a push stick but following the golden rule about blade exposure. I made my second saving throw by turning the blade off, bandaging and THEN completing the cut with a push-stick.

                     Now I do wear tight, thin leather gloves when working with my buffer and grinder. I scrape my knuckles frequently and end up grabbing hot metal more often then I would like but I've removed the guards from my grinder as well and the buffer is completely exposed. If something catches there is nothing to get pinched against and pulled into.

                     I'll wear kevlar gloves for carving or chiseling but not for power-tools. If you decide to wear them that's your choice.

                 

                Sean


                ----- Original Message -----
                From: "Julian Wilson" <lhjw66576@...>
                To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
                Sent: Monday, April 25, 2011 8:13:14 AM
                Subject: Re: [MedievalSawdust] Advice on table saw



                Kevlar-armoured working gloves are also a good idea. I have forgotten who sells them - but I know some Merchants DO list them in their catalogues.

                 Julian Wilson.

                --- On Mon, 25/4/11, Isabelle LaFar <isabelle@...> wrote:

                From: Isabelle LaFar <isabelle@...>
                Subject: Re: [MedievalSawdust] Advice on table saw
                To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
                Date: Monday, 25 April, 2011, 12:00

                 

                I've never used the guard on my table saw. It gets in the way. ;)

                I do, however, wear a face shield rather than plain old safety glasses. Wood chips and sawdust do not aim for the eyes only, and sting when they hit your face. Also, the face shield does not tend to fog up like safety glasses do.
                Don't touch a moving blade, use a push stick, and make sure your work is balanced.

                --Isabelle



              • Ralph
                ... Sorry, that s not just bad advise, that is DANGEROUS advise. You can get your hand cut with no glove, you can LOSE your hand with a glove (I ve seen it,
                Message 7 of 22 , Apr 25, 2011
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                  --- In medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com, Julian Wilson <lhjw66576@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > Kevlar-armoured working gloves are also a good idea. I have forgotten who sells them - but I know some Merchants DO list them in their catalogues.
                  >
                  Sorry, that's not just bad advise, that is DANGEROUS advise.

                  You can get your hand cut with no glove, you can LOSE your hand with a glove (I've seen it, trust me you don't want to)

                  Ralg
                  AnTir
                • Ralph
                  ... No you want to buy GOOD accessories. There are some great firms that build rip fences, guards, etc that will fit your saw. Check the sizes and shop your
                  Message 8 of 22 , Apr 25, 2011
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                    --- In medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com, "Royce" <rcetlin@...> wrote:
                    >

                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > I guess my question is, would it be recommended for me to shop Sears for the
                    > parts I need, namely the guard and fence, or is there a better source for
                    > the parts elsewhere? Also, aside from don't stick your fingers in the
                    > running blade, what other advice would there be for a starting table saw
                    > worker.
                    >


                    No you want to buy GOOD accessories. There are some great firms that build rip fences, guards, etc that will fit your saw. Check the sizes and shop your favorite (probably mail-order) source.

                    Getting a new SHARP blade (or blades) is also good advise.

                    Live in FEAR of your table-saw. I do, I have a dent in the shop door, 20+ feet from the table-saw where it tossed a 1/2.

                    I also live in FEAR of my band-saw, my lathe (a lathe just killed someone this month), my drill-press, my chain-saws, my..... I just realized I FEAR most of my shop.

                    Of course the only wood-working scars I have are from hand-tools. Maybe I should fear them too.

                    Ralg
                    AnTir
                  • Julian Wilson
                    Someone had better tell the  Government s Health & Safety Executive that, then. Amongst their H & S recommendations for safety in Joinery Shops is the
                    Message 9 of 22 , Apr 25, 2011
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                      Someone had better tell the  Government's "Health & Safety Executive" that, then. Amongst their H & S recommendations for safety in Joinery Shops is the " strongly-recommended use" of work gloves for safety purposes.
                      Different countries, - different rules about safety-at-work.
                       For example, over here it is actually against the Law to remove the riving knife and top guard from a table-saw, [ except when it's disconnected from a power supply, for maintainace purposes or blade changes.]
                       If that's done in a commercial environment and there's an table-saw accident, the HSE Inspectorate will prefer Criminal Charges against everyone from the Site-Workshop Manager down to the victim's colleagues. And if the accident happens in a DIY environment, it's likely the victims Insurance Co. will declare any accident insurance "void".
                      And on a personal note, using workgloves of various types on-site, in the boatyard, and in my pro. Joinery Shop has worked well for me for over 40 years.

                      Julian Wilson

                      --- On Mon, 25/4/11, Ralph <n7bsn@...> wrote:

                      From: Ralph <n7bsn@...>
                      Subject: [MedievalSawdust] NO GLOVES!!! Re: Advice on table saw
                      To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
                      Date: Monday, 25 April, 2011, 16:26

                       



                      --- In medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com, Julian Wilson <lhjw66576@...> wrote:
                      >
                      > Kevlar-armoured working gloves are also a good idea. I have forgotten who sells them - but I know some Merchants DO list them in their catalogues.
                      >
                      Sorry, that's not just bad advise, that is DANGEROUS advise.

                      You can get your hand cut with no glove, you can LOSE your hand with a glove (I've seen it, trust me you don't want to)

                      Ralg
                      AnTir

                    • Bob the Builder
                      So... the glove advice made me squick too, but it is because of how I use my tools.  IF you follow all of the safety procedures, have all of the safety
                      Message 10 of 22 , Apr 25, 2011
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                        So... the glove advice made me squick too, but it is because of how I use my tools.  IF you follow all of the safety procedures, have all of the safety equipment and know how to use it, gloves are a good idea.

                        If, on the other hand, you use tools in the home shop the way many of us do, making one tool do the jobs of many tools which it wasn't designed for (otherwise you wouldn't have to remove to top guard to do something) then gloves are something that snag on moving parts and draw the hand and body into harms way.

                        And, BTW, you should not wear jewelry (even your wedding ring) when working with power tools.

                        Pax,
                        Ysfael
                        --- On Mon, 4/25/11, Ralph <n7bsn@...> wrote:

                        From: Ralph <n7bsn@...>
                        Subject: [MedievalSawdust] NO GLOVES!!! Re: Advice on table saw
                        To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
                        Date: Monday, April 25, 2011, 11:26 AM



                        --- In medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com, Julian Wilson <lhjw66576@...> wrote:
                        >
                        > Kevlar-armoured working gloves are also a good idea. I have forgotten who sells them - but I know some Merchants DO list them in their catalogues.
                        >
                          Sorry, that's not just bad advise, that is DANGEROUS advise.

                          You can get your hand cut with no glove, you can LOSE your hand with a glove (I've seen it, trust me you don't want to)

                        Ralg
                        AnTir



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                      • Bobby Bourgoin (Robert du Bourg)
                        Julian Out of this string of mails but… If it’s illegal to remove the riving knife or top guard, how do you cut dados, or remove ½ the thickness, cut a
                        Message 11 of 22 , Apr 25, 2011
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                          Julian

                           

                          Out of this string of mails but…

                          If it’s illegal to remove the riving knife or top guard, how do you cut dados, or remove ½ the thickness, cut a tenon for a mortise and tenon, so on and so forth…

                           

                          Bobby

                           


                          From: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com [mailto: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com ] On Behalf Of Julian Wilson
                          Sent: 25 avril 2011 12:40
                          To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
                          Subject: Re: [MedievalSawdust] NO GLOVES!!! Re: Advice on table saw

                           

                           

                          Someone had better tell the  Government's "Health & Safety Executive" that, then. Amongst their H & S recommendations for safety in Joinery Shops is the " strongly-recommended use" of work gloves for safety purposes.
                          Different countries, - different rules about safety-at-work.
                           For example, over here it is actually against the Law to remove the riving knife and top guard from a table-saw, [ except when it's disconnected from a power supply, for maintainace purposes or blade changes.]
                           If that's done in a commercial environment and there's an table-saw accident, the HSE Inspectorate will prefer Criminal Charges against everyone from the Site-Workshop Manager down to the victim's colleagues. And if the accident happens in a DIY environment, it's likely the victims Insurance Co. will declare any accident insurance "void".
                          And on a personal note, using workgloves of various types on-site, in the boatyard, and in my pro. Joinery Shop has worked well for me for over 40 years.

                          Julian Wilson

                          --- On Mon, 25/4/11, Ralph <n7bsn@...> wrote:


                          From: Ralph <n7bsn@...>
                          Subject: [MedievalSawdust] NO GLOVES!!! Re: Advice on table saw
                          To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
                          Date: Monday, 25 April, 2011, 16:26

                           



                          --- In medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com, Julian Wilson <lhjw66576@...> wrote:

                          >
                          > Kevlar-armoured working gloves are also a good idea. I have forgotten
                          who sells them - but I know some Merchants DO list them in their catalogues.
                          >
                          Sorry, that's not just bad advise, that is DANGEROUS advise.

                          You can get your hand cut with no glove, you can LOSE your hand with a glove (I've seen it, trust me you don't want to)

                          Ralg
                          AnTir

                        • powell.sean@comcast.net
                          While I agree that certain cuts are impossible with certain guards in place, i t does not surprise me that different nations have different requirements and
                          Message 12 of 22 , Apr 25, 2011
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                            While I agree that certain cuts are impossible with certain guards in place, it does not surprise me that different nations have different requirements and regulations as the US has only recently updated our regulations. Here is a good document from OSHA's site:

                            http://www.osha.gov/Publications/woodworking_hazards/osha3157.html

                            Gloves are still listed as PPE for table saws (just below figure 3) but are expressly prohibited regarding lathes (below figure 19)

                             

                            Furthermore it states:

                            Heavy leather, metal mesh, or gloves may provide protection against cuts, abrasions, and lacerations, but they can also greatly reduce dexterity, possibly leading to a higher frequency of the mishaps they are intended to protect against. Furthermore, no glove will stand up to direct contact with the cutting surfaces of most of your power equipment. For these reasons, engineering and work-practice controls will be your best bet for addressing the hand and arm hazards posed by cutting and shaping equipment.

                            ...

                            As with gloves, protective clothing for workers operating powered cutting, shaping, and boring equipment should not pose a greater risk than the one being addressed. Avoid loose clothing that could snag in moving parts and pull a worker into harm. Also avoid excessive clothing that could result in reduced mobility or heat exhaustion. Use common sense in your decisionmaking.

                             

                            In general I take the 'Follow Norm' approach. Norm Abrahms still has all of his fingers and eyes despite how many thousands of hours on job sites and his wood-shop. He advocates Eyes and Brains. I try to follow what he does and what he says.

                            Sean

                            ----- Original Message -----
                            From: "Bobby Bourgoin (Robert du Bourg)" <bobby.bourgoin@...>
                            To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
                            Sent: Monday, April 25, 2011 2:20:13 PM
                            Subject: RE: [MedievalSawdust] NO GLOVES!!! Re: Advice on table saw



                            Julian

                             

                            Out of this string of mails but…

                            If it’s illegal to remove the riving knife or top guard, how do you cut dados, or remove ½ the thickness, cut a tenon for a mortise and tenon, so on and so forth…

                             

                            Bobby

                          • Julian Wilson
                            made long answer, offlist.  Julian ... From: Bobby Bourgoin (Robert du Bourg) Subject: RE: [MedievalSawdust] NO GLOVES!!! Re:
                            Message 13 of 22 , Apr 25, 2011
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                              made long answer, offlist.
                               Julian

                              --- On Mon, 25/4/11, Bobby Bourgoin (Robert du Bourg) <bobby.bourgoin@...> wrote:

                              From: Bobby Bourgoin (Robert du Bourg) <bobby.bourgoin@...>
                              Subject: RE: [MedievalSawdust] NO GLOVES!!! Re: Advice on table saw
                              To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
                              Date: Monday, 25 April, 2011, 18:20

                               

                              Julian

                               

                              Out of this string of mails but…

                              If it’s illegal to remove the riving knife or top guard, how do you cut dados, or remove ½ the thickness, cut a tenon for a mortise and tenon, so on and so forth…

                               

                              Bobby

                               


                              From: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com [mailto: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com ] On Behalf Of Julian Wilson
                              Sent: 25 avril 2011 12:40
                              To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
                              Subject: Re: [MedievalSawdust] NO GLOVES!!! Re: Advice on table saw

                               

                               

                              Someone had better tell the  Government's "Health & Safety Executive" that, then. Amongst their H & S recommendations for safety in Joinery Shops is the " strongly-recommended use" of work gloves for safety purposes.
                              Different countries, - different rules about safety-at-work.
                               For example, over here it is actually against the Law to remove the riving knife and top guard from a table-saw, [ except when it's disconnected from a power supply, for maintainace purposes or blade changes.]
                               If that's done in a commercial environment and there's an table-saw accident, the HSE Inspectorate will prefer Criminal Charges against everyone from the Site-Workshop Manager down to the victim's colleagues. And if the accident happens in a DIY environment, it's likely the victims Insurance Co. will declare any accident insurance "void".
                              And on a personal note, using workgloves of various types on-site, in the boatyard, and in my pro. Joinery Shop has worked well for me for over 40 years.

                              Julian Wilson

                              --- On Mon, 25/4/11, Ralph <n7bsn@...> wrote:


                              From: Ralph <n7bsn@...>
                              Subject: [MedievalSawdust] NO GLOVES!!! Re: Advice on table saw
                              To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
                              Date: Monday, 25 April, 2011, 16:26

                               



                              --- In medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com, Julian Wilson <lhjw66576@...> wrote:
                              >
                              > Kevlar-armoured working gloves are also a good idea. I have forgotten who sells them - but I know some Merchants DO list them in their catalogues.
                              >
                              Sorry, that's not just bad advise, that is DANGEROUS advise.

                              You can get your hand cut with no glove, you can LOSE your hand with a glove (I've seen it, trust me you don't want to)

                              Ralg
                              AnTir

                            • Karl Christoffers
                              Um, I was really looking forward to reading that answer, Julian. If you could post it to me, too, I would be very grateful.   -Karl   interestingclutter@
                              Message 14 of 22 , Apr 26, 2011
                              • 0 Attachment
                                Um, I was really looking forward to reading that answer, Julian. If you could post it to me, too, I would be very grateful.
                                 
                                -Karl
                                 
                                interestingclutter@ yahoo.com

                                --- On Mon, 4/25/11, Julian Wilson <lhjw66576@...> wrote:

                                 

                                Bobby

                                 


                                From: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com [mailto: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com ] On Behalf Of Julian Wilson
                                Sent: 25 avril 2011 12:40
                                To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
                                Subject: Re: [MedievalSawdust] NO GLOVES!!! Re: Advice on table saw

                                 

                                 

                                made long answer, offlist.
                                 Julian

                                --- On Mon, 25/4/11, Bobby Bourgoin (Robert du Bourg) <bobby.bourgoin@...> wrote:

                                From: Bobby Bourgoin (Robert du Bourg) <bobby.bourgoin@...>
                                Subject: RE: [MedievalSawdust] NO GLOVES!!! Re: Advice on table saw
                                To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
                                Date: Monday, 25 April, 2011, 18:20

                                 

                                Julian

                                 

                                Out of this string of mails but…

                                If it’s illegal to remove the riving knife or top guard, how do you cut dados, or remove ½ the thickness, cut a tenon for a mortise and tenon, so on and so forth…

                                Someone had better tell the  Government's "Health & Safety Executive" that, then. Amongst their H & S recommendations for safety in Joinery Shops is the " strongly-recommended use" of work gloves for safety purposes.
                                Different countries, - different rules about safety-at-work.
                                 For example, over here it is actually against the Law to remove the riving knife and top guard from a table-saw, [ except when it's disconnected from a power supply, for maintainace purposes or blade changes.]
                                 If that's done in a commercial environment and there's an table-saw accident, the HSE Inspectorate will prefer Criminal Charges against everyone from the Site-Workshop Manager down to the victim's colleagues. And if the accident happens in a DIY environment, it's likely the victims Insurance Co. will declare any accident insurance "void".
                                And on a personal note, using workgloves of various types on-site, in the boatyard, and in my pro. Joinery Shop has worked well for me for over 40 years.

                                Julian Wilson

                              • kirkdrago
                                I just picked up a craftsman 10 2.5 developed hp (137.248760 model) 5000 ... Since its a craftsman, you re going to be stuck going to Sears for a number of
                                Message 15 of 22 , Apr 26, 2011
                                • 0 Attachment
                                  I just picked up a craftsman 10" 2.5 developed hp (137.248760 model) 5000
                                  > rpm no-load speed table saw for $40 last weekend.

                                  Since its a craftsman, you're going to be stuck going to Sears for a number of the parts. A standard mitre won't fit the slot. I'd really recommend looking around for a quality universal fence. It will pay for itself. Shop Fox makes a good one that I used when I had a Craftsman.

                                  Have fun with it.

                                  Kirk
                                • jay sabath
                                  Just a bit of advise. Get the saw tuned up. Here is a good start. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lxRSarTJLMU ... -- Lord Johannes Machiavelli Canton of
                                  Message 16 of 22 , Apr 27, 2011
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                                    Just a bit of advise.  Get the saw tuned up.  Here is a good start.

                                    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lxRSarTJLMU


                                    On Sun, Apr 24, 2011 at 11:21 PM, Royce <rcetlin@...> wrote:
                                     

                                    Hello all,

                                     

                                    I’ve lurked around for a long while here, figuring one day I’ll finally start getting tools together to do woodworking. 

                                     

                                    My primary goal  is to be able to build decent, durable chests and chairs that look a lot more period than my folding metal garden chairs and plastic totes…

                                     

                                    I just picked up a craftsman 10” 2.5 developed hp (137.248760 model) 5000 rpm no-load speed table saw for $40 last weekend.  It runs, the guy I bought it from plugged it in and ran it in front of me to check.  I’ve taken it home, blown it out with air from the compressor, and hit the adjusting screws with wd-40.

                                     

                                    However, it didn’t have the blade guard, and it didn’t have either the fence or the miter.  I do not intend on operating it until I have at the very least the blade guard.  It also didn’t have the manual, but that’s only $9.99 from Sears.

                                     

                                    I guess my question is, would it be recommended for me to shop Sears for the parts I need, namely the guard and fence, or is there a better source for the parts elsewhere?  Also, aside from don’t stick your fingers in the running blade, what other advice would there be for a starting table saw worker.

                                     

                                    Bercilak

                                     




                                    --
                                    Lord Johannes Machiavelli
                                    Canton of Rokkehealden
                                    Barony of Ayreton
                                    Kingdom of the Middle
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