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Just an Intro and few question

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  • James
    Just thought I d introduce myself, name s James. Not an SCA member anymore but still like dabbling in a few areas. Been toying with the idea of buying myself
    Message 1 of 6 , Mar 10, 2011
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      Just thought I'd introduce myself, name's James. Not an SCA member anymore but still like dabbling in a few areas.

      Been toying with the idea of buying myself a few tools and making sawdust. Haven't done anything in a few years and well, who would have thought hand tolls would be trendy anymore. So, to make a long story short, anyone know of a non-EBay source to find tools at a reasonable price? Seems like all I'm finding is high-end reproductions of the older style tools and well, let's face it while good tools make better work. If you're rusty and can't remember how to even set a plane blade a $300 block plane is a bit much.

      Also, and the main reason I'm writing this, was planning on building a flywheel lathe with a friend. It's for his cabin that's off the grid so, power is an issue. Anyone ever thought of using "bike" style pedals to use to spin the shaft? Also thinking is using a wood and cement contraption to use as a flywheel (easier for one person to carry the parts instead of a huge iron weight) Figure I'll take a page out of the old roman wookbook and wet the stuff only enough to activate it and keep the shrinkage down then, pack it in a "wheel." In the past have made blocks the same way and they held up great.

      Thanks for reading,
      James
    • Jim Looper
      Congrats on getting back interested in making sawdust! I d recommend checking craigslist . You can sometimes find decent tools for reasonable prices
      Message 2 of 6 , Mar 10, 2011
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        Congrats on getting back interested in making sawdust!

        I'd recommend checking "craigslist". You can sometimes find decent tools for reasonable prices (depending on area...).

        You'd have to check the archives, but I remember someone posting an article a year or two ago about making a flywheel lathe on their website. Just do a search for flywheel on the group message page.

        Sincerely,

        Jim

        Don't blink, you'll miss my flash of brilliance!

        ----- Original Message -----
        From: "James" <thebard3@...>
        To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Thursday, March 10, 2011 1:41:28 PM
        Subject: [MedievalSawdust] Just an Intro and few question

        Just thought I'd introduce myself, name's James. Not an SCA member anymore but still like dabbling in a few areas.

        Been toying with the idea of buying myself a few tools and making sawdust. Haven't done anything in a few years and well, who would have thought hand tolls would be trendy anymore. So, to make a long story short, anyone know of a non-EBay source to find tools at a reasonable price? Seems like all I'm finding is high-end reproductions of the older style tools and well, let's face it while good tools make better work. If you're rusty and can't remember how to even set a plane blade a $300 block plane is a bit much.

        Also, and the main reason I'm writing this, was planning on building a flywheel lathe with a friend. It's for his cabin that's off the grid so, power is an issue. Anyone ever thought of using "bike" style pedals to use to spin the shaft? Also thinking is using a wood and cement contraption to use as a flywheel (easier for one person to carry the parts instead of a huge iron weight) Figure I'll take a page out of the old roman wookbook and wet the stuff only enough to activate it and keep the shrinkage down then, pack it in a "wheel." In the past have made blocks the same way and they held up great.

        Thanks for reading,
        James



        ------------------------------------
      • Vels inn Viggladi
        Highland Woodworking tends to carry middle as well as high end hand tools. You may want to look into the Woodriver line of hand-planes if that is a way you d
        Message 3 of 6 , Mar 10, 2011
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          Highland Woodworking tends to carry middle as well as high end hand tools. You may want to look into the Woodriver line of hand-planes if that is a way you'd like to go. Medium range tools that are fairly good right out of the box. Most you may expect is to need to sharpen the blade for about 20 minutes to get it to operate like a Premium plane.
          "Bargain Basement" tools, when you really get down to it, are really not worth the deal. Yes, you can get a Buck Brothers jack plane for $40, but you'll then have to spend an hour or four tuning it up so that it has niceties like a flat sole and good contact on the cap iron.

          Hand tools have made a resurgence, especially with the introduction of the premium tool lines the last few years.

          Pedal powered lathe... Check out the current season of The Woodwright's shop, the episodes on a the continuous curve windsor rocker features one. The episodes available online. As far as plans, no idea, but if you are any good at reverse engineering by sight, it's a start.


          Vels


          > From: "James" <thebard3@...>
          > To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
          > Sent: Thursday, March 10, 2011 1:41:28 PM
          > Subject: [MedievalSawdust] Just an Intro and few question
          >
          > Just thought I'd introduce myself, name's James. Not an SCA member anymore but still like dabbling in a few areas.
          >
          > Been toying with the idea of buying myself a few tools and making sawdust. Haven't done anything in a few years and well, who would have thought hand tolls would be trendy anymore. So, to make a long story short, anyone know of a non-EBay source to find tools at a reasonable price? Seems like all I'm finding is high-end reproductions of the older style tools and well, let's face it while good tools make better work. If you're rusty and can't remember how to even set a plane blade a $300 block plane is a bit much.
          >
          > Also, and the main reason I'm writing this, was planning on building a flywheel lathe with a friend. It's for his cabin that's off the grid so, power is an issue. Anyone ever thought of using "bike" style pedals to use to spin the shaft? Also thinking is using a wood and cement contraption to use as a flywheel (easier for one person to carry the parts instead of a huge iron weight) Figure I'll take a page out of the old roman wookbook and wet the stuff only enough to activate it and keep the shrinkage down then, pack it in a "wheel." In the past have made blocks the same way and they held up great.
          >
          > Thanks for reading,
          > James
          >
          >
          >
          > ------------------------------------
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
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        • Duncan Sinclair
          I agree with Craigslist! I just recently found a barely used 14 bandsaw for 1/2 price. SCORE!!! Duncan Sinclair (MKA: Chris Anderson) Shire of Qal at Ja far
          Message 4 of 6 , Mar 11, 2011
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            I agree with Craigslist! I just recently found a barely used 14" bandsaw for 1/2 price. SCORE!!!
             
            Duncan Sinclair (MKA: Chris Anderson)
            Shire of Qal 'at Ja'far
            and
            The Barony of Sternfeld
            Middle Kingdom

            Greenwood #514, F&AM



            From: Jim Looper <jimlooper@...>
            To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
            Sent: Thu, March 10, 2011 5:56:27 PM
            Subject: Re: [MedievalSawdust] Just an Intro and few question

             

            Congrats on getting back interested in making sawdust!

            I'd recommend checking "craigslist". You can sometimes find decent tools for reasonable prices (depending on area...).

            You'd have to check the archives, but I remember someone posting an article a year or two ago about making a flywheel lathe on their website. Just do a search for flywheel on the group message page.

            Sincerely,

            Jim

            Don't blink, you'll miss my flash of brilliance!

            ----- Original Message -----
            From: "James" <thebard3@...>
            To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
            Sent: Thursday, March 10, 2011 1:41:28 PM
            Subject: [MedievalSawdust] Just an Intro and few question

            Just thought I'd introduce myself, name's James. Not an SCA member anymore but still like dabbling in a few areas.

            Been toying with the idea of buying myself a few tools and making sawdust. Haven't done anything in a few years and well, who would have thought hand tolls would be trendy anymore. So, to make a long story short, anyone know of a non-EBay source to find tools at a reasonable price? Seems like all I'm finding is high-end reproductions of the older style tools and well, let's face it while good tools make better work. If you're rusty and can't remember how to even set a plane blade a $300 block plane is a bit much.

            Also, and the main reason I'm writing this, was planning on building a flywheel lathe with a friend. It's for his cabin that's off the grid so, power is an issue. Anyone ever thought of using "bike" style pedals to use to spin the shaft? Also thinking is using a wood and cement contraption to use as a flywheel (easier for one person to carry the parts instead of a huge iron weight) Figure I'll take a page out of the old roman wookbook and wet the stuff only enough to activate it and keep the shrinkage down then, pack it in a "wheel." In the past have made blocks the same way and they held up great.

            Thanks for reading,
            James

            ------------------------------------


          • Fritz Wilhelm
            On the subject of new hand tools, I have to put in a word for Lee Valley s Veritas line. Though, not as cheap as you might find on Craig s List, they about
            Message 5 of 6 , Mar 11, 2011
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              On the subject of new hand tools, I have to put in a word for Lee Valley's Veritas line. Though, not as cheap as you might find on Craig's List, they about half the price of Lie-Neilsen. ($145 for a low angle block plane). They are really nice users, right out of the box and show a lot of attention to the details that matter for functionality.

              Gene "Fritz" Eisele
              Owner, Fritz Wilhelm, LLC
              welldressedtent.com

            • Karl Christoffers
              I want to second Fritz s review of Veritas tools. And I wanted to at least suggest eBay for used Lie-Nielsen or Veritas tools. Having lost a number of auctions
              Message 6 of 6 , Mar 11, 2011
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                I want to second Fritz's review of Veritas tools. And I wanted to at least suggest eBay for used Lie-Nielsen or Veritas tools. Having lost a number of auctions over the last year or so, I note that L-N/V tools sell for 80%-90% of retail. Assuming you have the scratch to buy one, you should be able to use the tool until you decide whether you like it or not. And if you don't like it, re-sell it for just about what you paid for it. Cheap rental for a year or two.
                 
                -Malcolm
                 
                 
                --- On Fri, 3/11/11, Fritz Wilhelm <gene.eisele@...> wrote:
                 
                On the subject of new hand tools, I have to put in a word for Lee Valley's Veritas line. Though, not as cheap as you might find on Craig's List, they about half the price of Lie-Neilsen. ($145 for a low angle block plane). They are really nice users, right out of the box and show a lot of attention to the details that matter for functionality.

                Gene "Fritz" Eisele
                Owner, Fritz Wilhelm, LLC
                welldressedtent.com


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