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RE: [MedievalSawdust] Re: Period Tool Line

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  • D. Young
    dunno if you all can view attachments....a few pics of historical hammers in latter period... Fine Armour and Historical Reproductions Custom Commissions
    Message 1 of 41 , Feb 6 7:17 PM

    dunno if you all can view attachments....a few pics of historical hammers in latter period...






    Fine Armour and Historical Reproductions

         Custom Commissions Welcome....!

    www.partsandtechnical.com
    (Well Formed Munitions Catalog Coming This Spring)
     





    To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
    From: furnaceplans@...
    Date: Sun, 6 Feb 2011 22:05:22 -0500
    Subject: RE: [MedievalSawdust] Re: Period Tool Line

     
    As a research thought....dont limit searches to your period....I am amazed at how a few centuries up or down can reveal otherwise paucity of info about a tool type.

    As an example I am assembling info and pictures on 17th century iron carpenter hammers for nailing....WHEW....hard to find.  Ive got maybe a few solid pictures.   Otherwise Im having to delve back to the 16th century and up to the 18th century.   And even then its damn hard.   But by moving up and down a bit Im finding the in between.






    Fine Armour and Historical Reproductions

         Custom Commissions Welcome....!

    www.partsandtechnical.com
    (Well Formed Munitions Catalog Coming This Spring)
     





    To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
    From: jljonsn@...
    Date: Sun, 6 Feb 2011 21:32:55 -0500
    Subject: Re: [MedievalSawdust] Re: Period Tool Line

     
    Jean Bourdichon  

    b. 1457, d. 1521 Tours, France
    Illuminator
    French

    http://wwar.com/masters/b/bourdichon-jean.html

    Over the course of a career that lasted nearly forty years, Jean Bourdichon served as official court painter to four successive French kings: Louis XI, Charles VIII, Louis XII, and François I. As court painter, he designed stained glass windows, coins, and gold plate, illuminated manuscripts, and executed independent paintings. Charles VIII set up a workshop for him in his castle at Plessis-lès-Tours and gave large dowries to Bourdichon's daughters, and Bourdichon himself became a wealthy landowner. Although he is recorded as having received commissions for as many as forty paintings in one year, only one of his panel paintings is known to survive. Thus he is today known primarily from his work in manuscripts.

    Bourdichon was almost certainly a pupil of the previous court painter, Jean Fouquet; the Getty Museum's book of hours, Bourdichon's earliest surviving work, shows his debt to his mentor. From Fouquet he drew much of his iconography and learned the principles of Italian Renaissance painting.

    -------------
    Although I think Julian is probably correct in this might be using the holy family as an exemplar of the "Work" social condition.

    My other favorite popular tool-laden painting is the merode Altarpiece by Robert Campin.

    http://employees.oneonta.edu/farberas/arth/images/arth_214images/Campin/Merode_right.jpg

    QUOTE: This intimate triptych, which dates from about 1425, is traditionally known as the Mérode Altarpiece, after the family that owned it during the nineteenth century. It illustrates the moment when the archangel Gabriel announces to the Virgin Mary that she has been chosen by God to be the mother of Christ. The patrons of the painting gaze upon this miraculous event from one of the side panels, while Joseph, busy at his carpenter's bench, occupies the other wing. Campin's fascination with the natural and domestic world dominates his telling of the sacred story. He meticulously renders even the smallest details in an innovative technique combining translucent oil overlay on water-based opaque pigments. The resulting optical effects enhance Campin's interpretation of the Virgin's private chamber as an affluent fifteenth century interior filled with household appointments and goods similar to those that the patron would have known. Yet Campin was essentially guided in his choice of objects by the symbolic needs of the story. The brass laver, for example, signifies Mary's purity, as does the Madonna lily in the maiolica pitcher. As an object of private devotion, this painting would have been integrated into the furnishings of the owners' private quarters, where its hinged wings could be opened and closed according to the daily cadence of private prayers or following the traditions of the Christian calendar.

    The subject of the altarpiece is the Annunciation, but unusually for this theme, the right wing depicts Joseph at work in his carpenter's shop. The Catholic Church has traditionally held that Joseph had six children by a previous marriage, and since at that time he was only Mary's fiancé, not her husband, the couple did not live together. This peculiar assemblage of subjects is therefore extremely rare, not to say unique, in the history of painting. The objects in Joseph's workshop are chosen so as to symbolically prefigure the Passion: the sword-shaped saw in the foreground alludes to the weapon that St Peter would use to cut off Malchus' ear while Christ was being arrested; the log that lies nearby recalls the wood of the cross; the stick propped against it, of the crown of thorns; nails, hammers, pliers and screwdrivers all prefigure the instruments of the Passion. The moustrap which Joseph is making may be a reference either to Christ's arrest (the mouse being associated, in popular tradition, with the soul) or to the Augustinian doctrine that the Virgin's marriage and Christ's Incarnation were planned by Providence as a trap in which to catch the devil, like a mouse lured by a bait.

    It is also possible, however, that this painting is not, in fact, an Annunciation. In the left wing, it is clear from the landscape visible behind the donor that it is springtime. The snow flakes falling in the small square that can be glimpsed through the window behind Joseph, on the other hand, suggest that it is winter. If both are true, then the triptych may well be intended to symbolize the time that passed between 25 March and 25 December, between Christ's conception and his birth. In which case, it would best be described as a Nativity.

    PERSONALLY, I think it shows Joseph working on a common project and needing a bunch of tools to do it. :)


  • Jeff
    Kat, I contacted Gary, and he reloaded the site. All should be good now. In spite of it s being a bit dated, I still consider this to be one of the best
    Message 41 of 41 , Feb 12 4:57 PM
    • 0 Attachment
      Kat,

      I contacted Gary, and he reloaded the site. All should be good now. In spite of it's being a bit dated, I still consider this to be one of the best sources on medieval woodworking and tools.

      Jeff/Geoff

      --- In medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com, Jeffrey Johnson <jljonsn@...> wrote:
      >
      > Re: site infection. Maybe. I'll see if I have his address.
      > On Feb 4, 2011 8:21 PM, "Megan Shogren" <brockenspectre@...> wrote:
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > My AVG anti-virus says that site is infected- do you know how to get in
      > touch with the owner?
      > >
      > > Thanks,
      > > Kat Ferneley
      > >
      > > ________________________________
      > > From: Jeff <jljonsn@...>
      > > To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
      > > Sent: Thu, February 3, 2011 7:20:43 PM
      > > Subject: [MedievalSawdust] Re: Wood to use to be period???... What do you
      > think
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > A good synopsis of medieval wood uses:
      > >
      > > http://www.medievalwoodworking.org/articles/wood.htm
      > >
      > >
      > >
      >
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