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Writing slopes

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  • Dan Baker
    Looking for links to writing slopes, especially steep angled ones, 60 degrees or more -Rhys -- ()xxxx[]::::::::::::::::::
    Message 1 of 8 , Jan 28, 2011
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      Looking for links to writing slopes, especially steep angled ones, 60 degrees or more

      -Rhys

      --
      ()xxxx[]::::::::::::::::::>
    • Lynda Fjellman
      We had a little discussion on the subject of scrapers around the winter holidays. I ve found a bit of info that is pertinent. Let us go back to the knots or
      Message 2 of 8 , Jan 28, 2011
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        We had a little discussion on the subject of scrapers around the winter holidays.
        I've found a bit of info that is pertinent.

        "Let us go back to the knots or nodes, or other defects which the flat of the panel may display.  Take some strong leaf glue; heat up as much as a goblet or glass of water and boil two leaves of glue, in a pipkin free of grease.  Then have some sawdust wet down with this glue in a porringer.  Fill the flaws of the nodes with it, and smooth down with a wooden slice, and let it stand.  Then scrape with a knife point until it is even with the surrounding level."

        Cennino D'Andrea Cennini
        The Craftsman's Handbook

        For those of you that don't know, leaf glue is hide glue that has been prepared and then dried for future hydration and use, quite similar to what we can purchase as hide glue at the store.
        Aside from specifically mentioning scraping, it also is exactly the same method of making wood filler still being used now.
        It also explains why we might never have seen scrapers as a separate entity on work benches.  If they used a knife or other multi-purpose blade they wouldn't necessarily have had scrapers.
        Condesa Ilaria

      • Jeff
        Nice find! Especially sine it supports the position I made, that they d not have the special tool. ;) Also supports the use of wood filler made of glue &
        Message 3 of 8 , Jan 29, 2011
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          Nice find!

          Especially sine it supports the position I made, that they'd not have the special tool. ;)

          Also supports the use of wood filler made of glue & sawdust.

          Jeff

          --- In medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com, Lynda Fjellman <lyndafjellman@...> wrote:
          >
          > We had a little discussion on the subject of scrapers around the winter
          > holidays.
          > I've found a bit of info that is pertinent.
          >
          > "Let us go back to the knots or nodes, or other defects which the flat of the
          > panel may display. Take some strong leaf glue; heat up as much as a goblet or
          > glass of water and boil two leaves of glue, in a pipkin free of grease. Then
          > have some sawdust wet down with this glue in a porringer. Fill the flaws of the
          > nodes with it, and smooth down with a wooden slice, and let it stand. Then
          > scrape with a knife point until it is even with the surrounding level."
          >
          > Cennino D'Andrea Cennini
          > The Craftsman's Handbook
          >
          > For those of you that don't know, leaf glue is hide glue that has been prepared
          > and then dried for future hydration and use, quite similar to what we can
          > purchase as hide glue at the store.
          > Aside from specifically mentioning scraping, it also is exactly the same method
          > of making wood filler still being used now.
          > It also explains why we might never have seen scrapers as a separate entity on
          > work benches. If they used a knife or other multi-purpose blade they wouldn't
          > necessarily have had scrapers.
          > Condesa Ilaria
          >
        • D. Young
          Fascinating info Condessa. Ive never seen nor heard of wood filler but it must have had use somewhere....in something. I wanted to add some stuff from
          Message 4 of 8 , Jan 29, 2011
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            Fascinating info Condessa.    Ive never seen nor heard of wood filler but it must have had use somewhere....in something.



            I wanted to add some stuff from Josoph Moxon and a few other woodworking tool writers living in the late Renaissance.

            They describe planes having very high angles, in the neighborhood of about 80 degrees.....nearly vertical.

            This is a great article
            http://webcache.googleusercontent.com/search?q=cache:OPMrHzzFcbEJ:blog.woodworking-magazine.com/blog/Highangle%2BTry%2BPlanes%2BAnd%2BJointers.aspx+moxon+high+pitch+plane&cd=2&hl=en&ct=clnk&gl=us&source=www.google.com

            Look at the angle/pitch of the blades in these planes.   They are not quote 80 but around 70 degrees...(most planes are about 45 by comparison)
            http://www.gutenberg.org/files/27238/27238-h/images/image3a.jpg


            Its also been pointed out (and I cant believe I didnt think of this, that the blades of many planes can be flipped over for a higher steep or pitch.



            And Lie Nielson toolworks does sell scrapers..... http://www.lie-nielsen.com/catalog.php?cat=508


            cheers
            Drew



            Fine Armour and Historical Reproductions

                 Custom Commissions Welcome....!

            www.partsandtechnical.com
            (Well Formed Munitions Catalog Coming This Spring)
             





            To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
            From: lyndafjellman@...
            Date: Fri, 28 Jan 2011 16:07:48 -0800
            Subject: [MedievalSawdust] further info on scrapers

             

            We had a little discussion on the subject of scrapers around the winter holidays.
            I've found a bit of info that is pertinent.

            "Let us go back to the knots or nodes, or other defects which the flat of the panel may display.  Take some strong leaf glue; heat up as much as a goblet or glass of water and boil two leaves of glue, in a pipkin free of grease.  Then have some sawdust wet down with this glue in a porringer.  Fill the flaws of the nodes with it, and smooth down with a wooden slice, and let it stand.  Then scrape with a knife point until it is even with the surrounding level."

            Cennino D'Andrea Cennini
            The Craftsman's Handbook

            For those of you that don't know, leaf glue is hide glue that has been prepared and then dried for future hydration and use, quite similar to what we can purchase as hide glue at the store.
            Aside from specifically mentioning scraping, it also is exactly the same method of making wood filler still being used now.
            It also explains why we might never have seen scrapers as a separate entity on work benches.  If they used a knife or other multi-purpose blade they wouldn't necessarily have had scrapers.
            Condesa Ilaria


          • D. Young
            I wouldnt phrase it as not having a special tool....Id say they didnt make a big fuss out of a sharp piece of steel. But check out the info on Moxon and the
            Message 5 of 8 , Jan 29, 2011
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              I wouldnt phrase it as not having a special tool....Id say they didnt make a big fuss out of a sharp piece of steel.  

              But check out the info on Moxon and the pics of the high pitch planes.





              Fine Armour and Historical Reproductions

                   Custom Commissions Welcome....!

              www.partsandtechnical.com
              (Well Formed Munitions Catalog Coming This Spring)
               





              To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
              From: jljonsn@...
              Date: Sat, 29 Jan 2011 14:32:44 +0000
              Subject: [MedievalSawdust] Re: further info on scrapers

               
              Nice find!

              Especially sine it supports the position I made, that they'd not have the special tool. ;)

              Also supports the use of wood filler made of glue & sawdust.

              Jeff

              --- In medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com, Lynda Fjellman <lyndafjellman@...> wrote:
              >
              > We had a little discussion on the subject of scrapers around the winter
              > holidays.
              > I've found a bit of info that is pertinent.
              >
              > "Let us go back to the knots or nodes, or other defects which the flat of the
              > panel may display. Take some strong leaf glue; heat up as much as a goblet or
              > glass of water and boil two leaves of glue, in a pipkin free of grease. Then
              > have some sawdust wet down with this glue in a porringer. Fill the flaws of the
              > nodes with it, and smooth down with a wooden slice, and let it stand. Then
              > scrape with a knife point until it is even with the surrounding level."
              >
              > Cennino D'Andrea Cennini
              > The Craftsman's Handbook
              >
              > For those of you that don't know, leaf glue is hide glue that has been prepared
              > and then dried for future hydration and use, quite similar to what we can
              > purchase as hide glue at the store.
              > Aside from specifically mentioning scraping, it also is exactly the same method
              > of making wood filler still being used now.
              > It also explains why we might never have seen scrapers as a separate entity on
              > work benches. If they used a knife or other multi-purpose blade they wouldn't
              > necessarily have had scrapers.
              > Condesa Ilaria
              >


            • Eric
              Drew, I would still make a distinction between a high angle plane and a scraper. I know that you know that you prepare a plane blade differently than a
              Message 6 of 8 , Jan 30, 2011
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                Drew,

                I would still make a distinction between a high angle plane and a scraper. I know that you know that you prepare a plane blade differently than a scraper, you wouldn't burnish the edge of a plane blade right after you finish sharpening it. Looking at the modern Lie Nielsen handled scrapers, the blade angle is past vertical, somewhere between 100 and 110 degrees. Since we know that scrapers cut with a burr and other blades cut with a sharpened edge, in my mind, they are different animals. Basically, a scraper blade is mostly useless at an angle less than 90 degrees and regular sharpened edge (where burrs are bad) won't cut at an angle past 90 degrees. That said, you can emulate a scraper with a sharpened edge by approximating the attack angle of a scraper burr, but your edge will wear pretty quickly without the thickness of a scraper blade to support it.

                And yes I've used knives and chisel blades to scrape a small spot when needed, but for anything bigger than a few square inches, I pull out a scraper.

                In Service to the Dream,
                Eirikr Mjoksiglandi

                --- In medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com, "D. Young" <furnaceplans@...> wrote:
                >
                >
                > Fascinating info Condessa. Ive never seen nor heard of wood filler but it must have had use somewhere....in something.
                >
                > I wanted to add some stuff from Josoph Moxon and a few other woodworking tool writers living in the late Renaissance.
                >
                > They describe planes having very high angles, in the neighborhood of about 80 degrees.....nearly vertical.
                >
                > This is a great article
                > http://webcache.googleusercontent.com/search?q=cache:OPMrHzzFcbEJ:blog.woodworking-magazine.com/blog/Highangle%2BTry%2BPlanes%2BAnd%2BJointers.aspx+moxon+high+pitch+plane&cd=2&hl=en&ct=clnk&gl=us&source=www.google.com
                >
                > Look at the angle/pitch of the blades in these planes. They are not quote 80 but around 70 degrees...(most planes are about 45 by comparison)
                > http://www.gutenberg.org/files/27238/27238-h/images/image3a.jpg
                >
                > Its also been pointed out (and I cant believe I didnt think of this, that the blades of many planes can be flipped over for a higher steep or pitch.
                >
                > And Lie Nielson toolworks does sell scrapers..... http://www.lie-nielsen.com/catalog.php?cat=508
                >
                > cheers
                > Drew
                >
              • lorderec
                My good lord, In the files there is a folder Writing Slope where I have put documentation for my writing slope. Though mine is a low angle, there are a bunch
                Message 7 of 8 , Feb 2, 2011
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                  My good lord, In the files there is a folder Writing Slope where I have put documentation for my writing slope. Though mine is a low angle, there are a bunch of period images of steeper sloped varieties. Also, give St. Jerome a google, he's often depicted with writing implements.

                  -Erec

                  --- In medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com, Dan Baker <LordRhys@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > Looking for links to writing slopes, especially steep angled ones, 60
                  > degrees or more
                  >
                  > -Rhys
                  >
                  > --
                  > ()xxxx[]::::::::::::::::::>
                  >
                • Dan Baker
                  Wow thays an older post. I was looking for examples to make one for barter
                  Message 8 of 8 , Dec 9, 2011
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                    Wow thays an older post. I was looking for examples to make one for barter

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