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Re: Finish Nails & Water - was: Re: [MedievalSawdust] On the note of 'quick'

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  • Sean Powell
    Nope. I didn t use a steam iron. Actually I didn t use water either. I used 2 layers of a light stain. The first wasn t dark enough so I tried the second. The
    Message 1 of 24 , Jan 6, 2011
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      Nope. I didn't use a steam iron. Actually I didn't use water either. I used 2 layers of a light stain. The first wasn't dark enough so I tried the second. The second didn't make it much darker (I have since learned a lot more about applying stains including on how to apply stain to dark wood, let moisten and then rub vigorously can actually lighten the color.) Anyway after 2 layers of stain swelling the pores the holes closed up and the holes were hidden enough that I had to be careful not to hit the nails when mounting hinges and hasps.

      I grabbed some 1x scrap and dropping in a few finish nails. I left 2 flush, 2 sunk about 3/16-1/4" and 2 I sunk and then soaked to speed up the process. The closed up decently but yes are still noticeable. I'm going to let dry and re-wet again tomorrow to see what I get.

      I don't know if the wood I started with was wet and flowed around the nail better, dry and sponged up the water better, if we used different brands of finish nails or maybe one of us used spruce and the other yellow pine (although the box I have in deck-ceder gave me a similar response). If I can get good results I'll post pics and see if we can come up with a good way to do it.

      Or you know, mix a little glue and sawdust and plug the holes.

      Sean

      On 1/6/2011 7:07 PM, Jeffrey Johnson wrote:

      Steam iron?

      I've had some success compressing and steam expanding wood into joints.

      On Jan 6, 2011 3:42 PM, "Siegfried" <siegfried@...> wrote:
    • Siegfried
      ... Hey now, no changing your story Sean ;) You d said: A few drops of water ... So that s what I was trying, because it seemed like too good of a trick to
      Message 2 of 24 , Jan 6, 2011
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        On 1/6/11 7:56 PM, Sean Powell wrote:
        > Nope. I didn't use a steam iron. Actually I didn't use water either. I
        > used 2 layers of a light stain.

        Hey now, no changing your story Sean ;) You'd said: "A few drops of water"

        :-P

        So that's what I was trying, because it seemed like too good of a trick
        to be true. (Turns out, it was *grin*)

        > I don't know if the wood I started with was wet and flowed around the
        > nail better

        Well I know on my nail holes, that they are significant in size.
        Rectangle shaped, and probably 2.5mm wide and 5mm across. And are
        definitely 'missing' the wood that used to be there. So the nail didn't
        'shear in'. It punched the wood that was there deep down somewhere.

        > if we used different
        > brands of finish nails

        Senco (red box) 1.5" x 15g Angled finish nails (Galvanized)

        > or maybe one of us used spruce and the other
        > yellow pine (although the box I have in deck-ceder gave me a similar
        > response).

        No 'red tinge' of fir and definitely not yellow pine. But the generic
        'whitewood' of the Home Depot. So who knows exactly. ;)

        > If I can get good results I'll post pics and see if we can
        > come up with a good way to do it.

        Cool.

        > Or you know, mix a little glue and sawdust and plug the holes.

        Well yeah ... or just use wood filler :) In this case I don't care,
        for birdhouse sake, the holes are fine and give it the 'craft' look.
        Heck, the whole thing has been 'painted' with Crayon at this point ;)

        But I was just curious to test your trick, because if it worked to the
        90% mark ... it would be a neat trick for 'quick construction' indeed.

        Siegfried


        --
        Barun Siegfried Sebastian Faust - Barony of Highland Foorde - Atlantia
        http://hf.atlantia.sca.org/ - http://crossbows.biz/ - http://eliw.com/
      • Vels inn Viggladi
        ... One of the few places the Depot gets it right is with Whitewood . It actually is one of the thirty-five species of Spruce. The only certainties are that
        Message 3 of 24 , Jan 7, 2011
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          > No 'red tinge' of fir and definitely not yellow pine. But the generic
          > 'whitewood' of the Home Depot. So who knows exactly. ;)
          >
          >
          > Siegfried

          One of the few places the Depot gets it right is with "Whitewood". It actually is one of the thirty-five species of Spruce.
          The only certainties are that it isn't one of the five rare or endangered varieties of Spruce, Black Spruce (grows too small for lumber purposes), Red Spruce (typically reserved for high-end acoustic guitars), or "Mast and Spar Grade" Sitka.

          Otherwise, it is specifically as advertised. By definition, whitewood is only from a species of spruce.




          Vels
        • Siegfried
          Heh, I didn t know that Vels. Thank you very much for the information! Siegfried ... -- Barun Siegfried Sebastian Faust - Barony of Highland Foorde - Atlantia
          Message 4 of 24 , Jan 7, 2011
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            Heh, I didn't know that Vels. Thank you very much for the information!

            Siegfried

            On 1/7/11 10:53 AM, Vels inn Viggladi wrote:
            > Otherwise, it is specifically as advertised. By definition, whitewood is
            > only from a species of spruce.
            >
            > Vels
            >


            --
            Barun Siegfried Sebastian Faust - Barony of Highland Foorde - Atlantia
            http://hf.atlantia.sca.org/ - http://crossbows.biz/ - http://eliw.com/
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