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Re: New Here-- Advice on bed frame?

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  • perriscott
    Thank You, Seigneur! That particular folding [bed in a box] is what I was looking for-- correct time period as well! *bonus* Though I am still thinking of
    Message 1 of 8 , Jan 6, 2011
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      Thank You, Seigneur!

      That particular folding [bed in a box] is what I was looking for-- correct time period as well! *bonus*

      Though I am still thinking of making a simple 'peg-together' and leave it set up between events... I am tired of sleeping on a camp cot. lol. Exchanging one modern 'camp cot' for a 'Period camp cot'.

      But at any rate, thanks again for the info and I will keep you all informed as to my progress and post pix of the finished project.

      All the Best,
      Elspeth McArran,
      Regiment de' Hepburn



      --- In medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com, "Bobby Bourgoin (Robert du Bourg)" <bobby.bourgoin@...> wrote:
      >
      > Greetings Elsphet
      >
      >
      >
      > I found the medieval folding bed. It's actually in the medieval sawdust
      > site. One PDF file for plans and there are pics of the completed project in
      > the photos section.
      >
      >
      >
      > Seigneur Robert du Bourg
      >
      > <mailto:bobby.bourgoin@...> bobby.bourgoin@...
      >
      > Bobby Bourgoin
      >
      >
      >
      > If I sing a song, will you sing along, or should I just keep singing right
      > here by myself?
      >
      > If I tell you I'm strong, will you play along, or will you see I'm as
      > insecure as anybody else?
      >
      > If I follow along, does it mean I belong, or will I keep on feeling
      > different from everybody else?
      >
      > Sing
      > Along - Blue Man Group
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > _____
      >
      > From: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
      > [mailto:medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of perriscott
      > Sent: 5 janvier 2011 12:16
      > To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
      > Subject: [MedievalSawdust] New Here-- Advice on bed frame?
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > Greetings,
      >
      > I am new to this list and I am seeking advice from more experienced
      > woodworkers than I. I have looked at photos and the Files section, but have
      > not found exactly what I need...
      >
      > I am trying to work out a variation of a slat bed that breaks down for easy
      > transport. I have found numerous versions of "full" size and even "queen"
      > size-- it is a simple matter to downsize for a "single/twin", however, I
      > have not been able to locate a size for legs.
      >
      > The bed has to support under 200 lbs, so 6"X6" is not _necessary_ but would
      > no doubt be sturdier in the long run. My proposed Materials List includes
      > (so far) 2X4's, 1X6"'s & 1X1" furring strips and 1/4" to 1/2" dowel pegs.
      >
      > If anyone can suggest a different list of materials or construction method I
      > would be grateful. This bed will (ideally) be permanently set up for home
      > use as well as event use, so it needs to break down and set up without
      > losing integrity over time.
      >
      > Thank you in advance,
      > Elspeth McArran,
      > Regiment de Hepburn
      >
    • Wilhelm von Frankfurt
      For my queen sized bed, I used 4x4 s for the posts and metal fasteners for the bed rails. Go to Rockler, search for bed rails . You ll find fasteners and
      Message 2 of 8 , Jan 6, 2011
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        For my queen sized bed, I used 4x4's for the posts and metal fasteners for the bed rails.

        Go to Rockler, search for "bed rails". You'll find fasteners and brackets that are easy to breakdown and will survive transport. All of these are hidden like mortise and tenon construction would be.

        I also suggest you seal your bed rails to prevent them drying/wetting and warping. One of my rails twisted a bit and made if difficult to assemble.

        Wilhelm vF

        --- In medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com, "perriscott" <perriscott@...> wrote:
        >
        > Greetings,
        >
        > I am new to this list and I am seeking advice from more experienced woodworkers than I. I have looked at photos and the Files section, but have not found exactly what I need...
        >
        > I am trying to work out a variation of a slat bed that breaks down for easy transport. I have found numerous versions of "full" size and even "queen" size-- it is a simple matter to downsize for a "single/twin", however, I have not been able to locate a size for legs.
        >
        > The bed has to support under 200 lbs, so 6"X6" is not _necessary_ but would no doubt be sturdier in the long run. My proposed Materials List includes (so far) 2X4's, 1X6"'s & 1X1" furring strips and 1/4" to 1/2" dowel pegs.
        >
        > If anyone can suggest a different list of materials or construction method I would be grateful. This bed will (ideally) be permanently set up for home use as well as event use, so it needs to break down and set up without losing integrity over time.
        >
        > Thank you in advance,
        > Elspeth McArran,
        > Regiment de Hepburn
        >
      • AlbionWood
        Leg sectional dimension is primarily determined by joinery. Since the legs are mostly in compression, you only need a very small section to hold 200 lbs. But
        Message 3 of 8 , Jan 6, 2011
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          Leg sectional dimension is primarily determined by joinery. Since the
          legs are mostly in compression, you only need a very small section to
          hold 200 lbs. But you do need a wide rail-to-leg contact to reduce
          racking stress on the legs.

          For my slat beds, I use 8/4 planed down to about 1-3/4" thickness, and
          about 2-1/2 to 3" wide. This leaves plenty of wood around the 7/8"
          mortises for the rail tusk-tenons. Structurally, nominal 2x2 (1-1/2"
          square) would probably suffice, but it would look funny.

          Rails are more critical, because they must support a dynamic load across
          a long span without twisting or bowing (which could cause the slats to
          fall out). Dimensions depend on the wood you are using; with oak and
          ash, I've had good results with 7/8" rails 5" or wider.

          I don't build beds of softwood. My squire made a rope bed of fir, with
          4x4 posts and 2x6 rails (tenoned full thickness through the posts). The
          rails held up fine but the posts split above the mortises, from
          torsion/racking.

          The biggest thing is to design and cut the joints (side rails to legs,
          headboard and footboard to legs) to resist racking. If those joints
          have any play at all, the mortises are likely to split no matter how
          thick the legs are.

          Cheers,
          Tim

          p.s. You can see the design I use here:
          http://albionworks.com/bed.html


          On 1/5/2011 9:15 AM, perriscott wrote:
          > Greetings,
          >
          > I am new to this list and I am seeking advice from more experienced woodworkers than I. I have looked at photos and the Files section, but have not found exactly what I need...
          >
          > I am trying to work out a variation of a slat bed that breaks down for easy transport. I have found numerous versions of "full" size and even "queen" size-- it is a simple matter to downsize for a "single/twin", however, I have not been able to locate a size for legs.
          >
          > The bed has to support under 200 lbs, so 6"X6" is not _necessary_ but would no doubt be sturdier in the long run. My proposed Materials List includes (so far) 2X4's, 1X6"'s& 1X1" furring strips and 1/4" to 1/2" dowel pegs.
          >
          > If anyone can suggest a different list of materials or construction method I would be grateful. This bed will (ideally) be permanently set up for home use as well as event use, so it needs to break down and set up without losing integrity over time.
          >
          > Thank you in advance,
          > Elspeth McArran,
          > Regiment de Hepburn
          >
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