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Re: [MedievalSawdust] Decisions decisions...

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  • Sean Powell
    The tool I would personally add to this list is a table-top drill press. You can replace a doweling jig with a drill-press if you are careful with your
    Message 1 of 22 , Jan 3, 2011
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      The tool I would personally add to this list is a table-top drill press. You can replace a doweling jig with a drill-press if you are careful with your marking. You can use it for blind mortise holes and you can push a lot more continuous torque out of them then a cordless drill. If you need to and don't value your bearings overly much you can use them as a drum-sander and in an emergency as a lathe for small bits that fit in the chuck. (usual precautions and then some for this stuff)

      Sean

      On 1/3/2011 5:09 PM, Jack Needles wrote: I got sears gift cards for Xmas.. so I've been looking at more tools.. (who wouldnt?) but I'm not sure how I want to go..  I foresee myself doing a bunch of cabinet and table building in the near future.. but I'm not sure if I want to get a router/table combo, Dremel multi-max or Trio, or a biscuit joiner.  I don't own a circular saw.  I'd like to limit my budget to < $150 total if I can but I know I need to graduate to grown up tools at some point.

      Power tools I have:

      Craftsman 3 in 1 cutting tool/aka Rotozip with plunge/fixed router and drywall cutter base attachment (cuts laminate flooring like buttah)
      12" Compound Mitre Saw
      Delta 10" Table Saw
      B&D 18v Cordless drill
      Makita 1/2" Hammer Drill
      Craftsman rotary tool (Dremel light)
      1 gallon compressor with brad nailer/staple gun
      Mouse sander
      Belt sander

      I'm not opposed to using a pocket or doweling jig where needed..  I know craftsman makes a router attachment that cuts biscuit holes, but I can't vouch for its quality.

      Suggestions?

      Malachai
    • conradh@efn.org
      ... I d agree. The drill press is far more versatile than the other tools on your list, and there are fewer substitutes for what it does. Ulfhedinn
      Message 2 of 22 , Jan 3, 2011
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        On Mon, January 3, 2011 2:32 pm, Sean Powell wrote:
        >

        > The tool I would personally add to this list is a table-top drill
        > press. You can replace a doweling jig with a drill-press if you are
        > careful with your marking. You can use it for blind mortise holes and
        > you can push a lot more continuous torque out of them then a cordless
        > drill. If you need to and don't value your bearings overly much you
        > can use them as a drum-sander and in an emergency as a lathe for
        > small bits that fit in the chuck. (usual precautions and then some
        > for this stuff)
        >
        I'd agree. The drill press is far more versatile than the other tools on
        your list, and there are fewer substitutes for what it does.

        Ulfhedinn
      • Peter Ellison
        I suggest the router and table. If you get a moderate priced set of them you should be good for a long time. That tool will make lap joints easier to make and
        Message 3 of 22 , Jan 3, 2011
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          I suggest the router and table.

          If you get a moderate priced set of them you should be good for a long time.

          That tool will make lap joints easier to make and rounding over the edges.  I suppose there are other uses for the tool but personally that is about all I use mine for :-)  If you get one, don't forget to budget for a cheap set of carbide bits, many years later I'm still using my first set of 20 some bits.

          If you need something special (a really big round over or a template tracing bit) get them on an as needed.

          It would be hard to go wrong with a drill press, it makes getting holes at 90 degrees so things assemble better.  They really shine when you need to make a lot of holes like making multiple copies of something or a slate frame (32 holes per, size copies = one over heated cheap drill press :-)

          Peter


          > I got sears gift cards for Xmas.. so I've been looking at more tools..
          > (who
          > wouldnt?) but I'm not sure how I want to go.. I foresee myself doing a
          > bunch of cabinet and table building in the near future.. but I'm not sure
          > if
          > I want to get a router/table combo, Dremel multi-max or Trio, or a biscuit
          > joiner. I don't own a circular saw. I'd like to limit my budget to <
          > $150
          > total if I can but I know I need to graduate to grown up tools at some
          > point.
          >
          > Power tools I have:
          >
          > Craftsman 3 in 1 cutting tool/aka Rotozip with plunge/fixed router and
          > drywall cutter base attachment (cuts laminate flooring like buttah)
          > 12" Compound Mitre Saw
          > Delta 10" Table Saw
          > B&D 18v Cordless drill
          > Makita 1/2" Hammer Drill
          > Craftsman rotary tool (Dremel light)
          > 1 gallon compressor with brad nailer/staple gun
          > Mouse sander
          > Belt sander
          >
          > I'm not opposed to using a pocket or doweling jig where needed.. I know
          > craftsman makes a router attachment that cuts biscuit holes, but I can't
          > vouch for its quality.
          >
          > Suggestions?
          >
          > Malachai
          >
        • Duncan Sinclair
          Start with a Circular saw! With the rotozip type, you don t need the Dremel Trio. It s an underpowered version. My lovely wife got me a multi-max for
          Message 4 of 22 , Jan 3, 2011
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            Start with a Circular saw! With the rotozip type, you don't need the Dremel Trio. It's an underpowered version. My lovely wife got me a multi-max for Christmas. A dowling jig is nice, and I am looking for a biscuit joiner myself.

            Duncan Sinclair (MKA: Chris Anderson)
            Shire of Qal 'at Ja'far
            and
            The Barony of Sternfeld
            Middle Kingdom

            Greenwood #514, F&AM

            --- On Mon, 1/3/11, Jack Needles <jneedles@...> wrote:

            From: Jack Needles <jneedles@...>
            Subject: [MedievalSawdust] Decisions decisions...
            To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
            Date: Monday, January 3, 2011, 10:09 PM

             

            I got sears gift cards for Xmas.. so I've been looking at more tools.. (who wouldnt?) but I'm not sure how I want to go..  I foresee myself doing a bunch of cabinet and table building in the near future.. but I'm not sure if I want to get a router/table combo, Dremel multi-max or Trio, or a biscuit joiner.  I don't own a circular saw.  I'd like to limit my budget to < $150 total if I can but I know I need to graduate to grown up tools at some point.

            Power tools I have:

            Craftsman 3 in 1 cutting tool/aka Rotozip with plunge/fixed router and drywall cutter base attachment (cuts laminate flooring like buttah)
            12" Compound Mitre Saw
            Delta 10" Table Saw
            B&D 18v Cordless drill
            Makita 1/2" Hammer Drill
            Craftsman rotary tool (Dremel light)
            1 gallon compressor with brad nailer/staple gun
            Mouse sander
            Belt sander

            I'm not opposed to using a pocket or doweling jig where needed..  I know craftsman makes a router attachment that cuts biscuit holes, but I can't vouch for its quality.

            Suggestions?

            Malachai


          • Megan Shogren
            Depending on how fiddly you think you ll get (for me, the answer is very ), a scroll saw might be a good addition. It doesn t take as thick material as a
            Message 5 of 22 , Jan 3, 2011
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              Depending on how fiddly you think you'll get (for me, the answer is "very"), a scroll saw might be a good addition.  It doesn't take as thick material as a bandsaw, but makes much tighter curves and you can start the blade in the middle of the piece through a tiny drilled hole.  If shop space is at a premium, it's also easier to store than a full-sized bandsaw.  They also tend to be cheaper, and the blades are way easier to calibrate and change.  Nor do you have to worry about them taking your finger off- there's a reason a scroll saw was my first power tool at age 7.  YMMV, but I'd personally rather have (and do have) a floor bandsaw for the big stuff and the scroll saw for detail work instead of a benchtop bandsaw with its very limited throat depth.

              If you're looking at the Sears router/tables, think about how much horsepower you're going to need.  My husband and I got one of the cheaper Craftsman ones, and while it's fine for light stuff, he's been informed by another local woodworker that he really needs one much more powerful as well.  I know an enabler when I hear one (after all, I am MOAS of my local group), but he's right- the little one just doesn't have the torque to do some of the heavy plywood stuff.

              A drill press is another good idea, but again, see if you can get a floor-mount one- that extra throat depth makes a huge difference, and generally the motors are heavier-duty.

              -Kat Ferneley


              From: Jack Needles <jneedles@...>
              To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
              Sent: Mon, January 3, 2011 5:09:55 PM
              Subject: [MedievalSawdust] Decisions decisions...

               

              I got sears gift cards for Xmas.. so I've been looking at more tools.. (who wouldnt?) but I'm not sure how I want to go..  I foresee myself doing a bunch of cabinet and table building in the near future.. but I'm not sure if I want to get a router/table combo, Dremel multi-max or Trio, or a biscuit joiner.  I don't own a circular saw.  I'd like to limit my budget to < $150 total if I can but I know I need to graduate to grown up tools at some point.

              >snip<
              Malachai


            • Liedtke Goetz
              Clearly you do not have enough cordless drills. As I heard on the CarTalk Men s Christmas Gift episode, when in doubt about what gift to get a man, you can
              Message 6 of 22 , Jan 3, 2011
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                Clearly you do not have enough cordless drills. As I heard on the CarTalk Men's Christmas Gift episode, when in doubt about what gift to get a man, you can always rely on getting them a cordless drill.

                --- On Mon, 1/3/11, Jack Needles <jneedles@...> wrote:

                From: Jack Needles <jneedles@...>
                Subject: [MedievalSawdust] Decisions decisions...
                To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
                Date: Monday, January 3, 2011, 2:09 PM



                I got sears gift cards for Xmas.. so I've been looking at more tools.. (who wouldnt?) but I'm not sure how I want to go..  I foresee myself doing a bunch of cabinet and table building in the near future.. but I'm not sure if I want to get a router/table combo, Dremel multi-max or Trio, or a biscuit joiner.  I don't own a circular saw.  I'd like to limit my budget to < $150 total if I can but I know I need to graduate to grown up tools at some point.

                Power tools I have:

                Craftsman 3 in 1 cutting tool/aka Rotozip with plunge/fixed router and drywall cutter base attachment (cuts laminate flooring like buttah)
                12" Compound Mitre Saw
                Delta 10" Table Saw
                B&D 18v Cordless drill
                Makita 1/2" Hammer Drill
                Craftsman rotary tool (Dremel light)
                1 gallon compressor with brad nailer/staple gun
                Mouse sander
                Belt sander

                I'm not opposed to using a pocket or doweling jig where needed..  I know craftsman makes a router attachment that cuts biscuit holes, but I can't vouch for its quality.

                Suggestions?

                Malachai



              • Dan Baker
                While the next tool on my list would be a drill press, I would go for a floor model not the table top. It s going to have a better motor and more throat space
                Message 7 of 22 , Jan 4, 2011
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                  While the next tool on my list would be a drill press, I would go for a floor model not the table top.  It's going to have a better motor and more throat space for bigger projects.

                  Also consider making some jigs to make you current tools more versatile.  I use my table saw for raised panels,   Fairly simple and low cost.  a bit more sanding then you would get with a router/shaper.  You can find free plans for shop built jigs all over the internet, as well as some decent books on the subject.  Jigs give a small shop a  heck of a lot more versatility especially if you don't have a lot of floor space.

                   I don't know if Craftsman makes a tenoning jig, but they are quite a time saver.  One of the only store bought jigs I have

                  And I wouldn't recommend the brisket cutter for a router.  have you ever done spline jointing?  Only takes a tablesaw (ok for the purists out there it takes a couple of block planes, but a table saw works with a tall fence.  http://www.binkyswoodworking.com/SplinedEdgeJointTip.php

                  -Rhys

                  On Mon, Jan 3, 2011 at 5:32 PM, Sean Powell <powell.sean@...> wrote:
                   

                  The tool I would personally add to this list is a table-top drill press. You can replace a doweling jig with a drill-press if you are careful with your marking. You can use it for blind mortise holes and you can push a lot more continuous torque out of them then a cordless drill. If you need to and don't value your bearings overly much you can use them as a drum-sander and in an emergency as a lathe for small bits that fit in the chuck. (usual precautions and then some for this stuff)

                  Sean

                  On 1/3/2011 5:09 PM, Jack Needles wrote:

                  I got sears gift cards for Xmas.. so I've been looking at more tools.. (who wouldnt?) but I'm not sure how I want to go..  I foresee myself doing a bunch of cabinet and table building in the near future.. but I'm not sure if I want to get a router/table combo, Dremel multi-max or Trio, or a biscuit joiner.  I don't own a circular saw.  I'd like to limit my budget to < $150 total if I can but I know I need to graduate to grown up tools at some point.

                  Power tools I have:

                  Craftsman 3 in 1 cutting tool/aka Rotozip with plunge/fixed router and drywall cutter base attachment (cuts laminate flooring like buttah)
                  12" Compound Mitre Saw
                  Delta 10" Table Saw
                  B&D 18v Cordless drill
                  Makita 1/2" Hammer Drill
                  Craftsman rotary tool (Dremel light)
                  1 gallon compressor with brad nailer/staple gun
                  Mouse sander
                  Belt sander

                  I'm not opposed to using a pocket or doweling jig where needed..  I know craftsman makes a router attachment that cuts biscuit holes, but I can't vouch for its quality.

                  Suggestions?

                  Malachai



                  --
                  ()xxxx[]::::::::::::::::::>
                • D. Young
                  You buy hand tools Power tools make grasshoppper weak. Fine Armour and Historical Reproductions Custom Commissions Welcome....! www.partsandtechnical.com (Well
                  Message 8 of 22 , Jan 4, 2011
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                    You buy hand tools

                    Power tools make grasshoppper weak.





                    Fine Armour and Historical Reproductions

                         Custom Commissions Welcome....!

                    www.partsandtechnical.com
                    (Well Formed Munitions Catalog Coming This Spring)
                     





                    To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
                    From: jneedles@...
                    Date: Mon, 3 Jan 2011 17:09:55 -0500
                    Subject: [MedievalSawdust] Decisions decisions...

                     
                    I got sears gift cards for Xmas.. so I've been looking at more tools.. (who wouldnt?) but I'm not sure how I want to go..  I foresee myself doing a bunch of cabinet and table building in the near future.. but I'm not sure if I want to get a router/table combo, Dremel multi-max or Trio, or a biscuit joiner.  I don't own a circular saw.  I'd like to limit my budget to < $150 total if I can but I know I need to graduate to grown up tools at some point.

                    Power tools I have:

                    Craftsman 3 in 1 cutting tool/aka Rotozip with plunge/fixed router and drywall cutter base attachment (cuts laminate flooring like buttah)
                    12" Compound Mitre Saw
                    Delta 10" Table Saw
                    B&D 18v Cordless drill
                    Makita 1/2" Hammer Drill
                    Craftsman rotary tool (Dremel light)
                    1 gallon compressor with brad nailer/staple gun
                    Mouse sander
                    Belt sander

                    I'm not opposed to using a pocket or doweling jig where needed..  I know craftsman makes a router attachment that cuts biscuit holes, but I can't vouch for its quality.

                    Suggestions?

                    Malachai


                  • W. Roberts
                    In my experience (standard disclaimer applies: YMMV), power tools make grasshopper go through boxes of BandAdes faster, too! On a more serious note, if I had
                    Message 9 of 22 , Jan 4, 2011
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                      In my experience (standard disclaimer applies: YMMV), power tools make grasshopper go through boxes of BandAdes faster, too!

                      On a more serious note, if "I" had the money to throw at it I'd seriously look a good, ultra-heavy-duty, higher-than-contractor-grade circular saw - preferably worm-drive. I just seem to "steer" them better.

                      Although.....I've had need for a good, floor-sized band-saw and/or drill press on occasion. If space wasn't at such a premium here, I'd probably be looking at one of them, too.

                      --- furnaceplans@... wrote:


                      You buy hand tools

                      Power tools make grasshoppper weak.
                    • conradh@efn.org
                      ... I have a Rockwell radial drill press, tabletop model but on a stand. I can slide the boom out to the point where I can drill the center of a 36 inch
                      Message 10 of 22 , Jan 5, 2011
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                        On Tue, January 4, 2011 4:24 am, Dan Baker wrote:
                        > While the next tool on my list would be a drill press, I would go for a
                        > floor model not the table top. It's going to have a better motor and more
                        > throat space for bigger projects.
                        >
                        I have a Rockwell radial drill press, tabletop model but on a stand. I
                        can slide the boom out to the point where I can drill the center of a 36
                        inch circle, swing the head out to where I can clear the whole stand and
                        drill something four feet tall that's sitting on the floor. The head also
                        tilts and locks at any angle.

                        It's fairly rigid for all that; with the boom all the way in I've put an
                        end mill in it and milled aluminum successfully, with hand feed. As the
                        boom is extended of course there's more play.

                        I bought this new, and I've used it hard for almost thirty years. I've
                        worn out three motors--but this costs nothing because it takes 1/2 horse
                        motors from toploader washing machines. Unlike most other appliances,
                        this sort of washer uses a motor with thrust bearings so it can run with a
                        vertical shaft, which is what you need for a radial drill. When a washing
                        machine conks out, it's usually the transmission or the timer switch or
                        the pump; the motor is usually fine.

                        So I'm really happy with this machine, and would recommend it highly. I'm
                        not sure if they're still made, but I know someone who's using one that's
                        almost fifty years old, so a used one could be still in decent shape.
                        They were really well made.

                        Ulfhedinn
                      • Jim Hart
                        I ve had just as many band-aid moments with hand tools.
                        Message 11 of 22 , Jan 11, 2011
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                          I've had just as many band-aid moments with hand tools.



                          On Tue, Jan 4, 2011 at 5:52 PM, W. Roberts <wolfeyes@...> wrote:
                           

                          In my experience (standard disclaimer applies: YMMV), power tools make grasshopper go through boxes of BandAdes faster, too!

                          On a more serious note, if "I" had the money to throw at it I'd seriously look a good, ultra-heavy-duty, higher-than-contractor-grade circular saw - preferably worm-drive. I just seem to "steer" them better.

                          Although.....I've had need for a good, floor-sized band-saw and/or drill press on occasion. If space wasn't at such a premium here, I'd probably be looking at one of them, too.

                          --- furnaceplans@... wrote:

                          You buy hand tools

                          Power tools make grasshoppper weak.


                        • Siegfried
                          Personally I ve had far more band-aid moments with my hand tools. A knife slipping and cutting me. A saw binding. A saw popping through and doing bad things
                          Message 12 of 22 , Jan 11, 2011
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                            Personally I've had far more band-aid moments with my hand tools. A
                            knife slipping and cutting me. A saw binding. A saw popping through
                            and doing bad things to me.

                            Or heck, just picking them up wrong when they are razor sharp.

                            However, they have all been band-aid moments, not Emergency Room
                            moments. (Well except that one time when I was cutting a leather strap
                            with a knife, and the knife popping out of the strip and sliced a 4"
                            long gash above my knee.)

                            I've only had one incident with a power tool, and it was NOT a band-aid
                            situation. It was a get to the hospital ASAP (running my finger through
                            a router bit).

                            I would expect any power tool incident to be a 'hospital' trip. And
                            hand tools to primariy be just bandaids.

                            Siegfried

                            (Wait, do I have to include random 'hitting my hand on the disk sander'
                            incidents? Cause they don't hurt, just remove the fingerprints for a
                            few days or make my nails nice and smooth *grin*)


                            On 1/11/11 8:44 AM, Jim Hart wrote:
                            >
                            >
                            > I've had just as many band-aid moments with hand tools.
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            > On Tue, Jan 4, 2011 at 5:52 PM, W. Roberts <wolfeyes@...
                            > <mailto:wolfeyes@...>> wrote:
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            > In my experience (standard disclaimer applies: YMMV), power tools
                            > make grasshopper go through boxes of BandAdes faster, too!
                            >
                            > On a more serious note, if "I" had the money to throw at it I'd
                            > seriously look a good, ultra-heavy-duty,
                            > higher-than-contractor-grade circular saw - preferably worm-drive. I
                            > just seem to "steer" them better.
                            >
                            > Although.....I've had need for a good, floor-sized band-saw and/or
                            > drill press on occasion. If space wasn't at such a premium here, I'd
                            > probably be looking at one of them, too.
                            >
                            > --- furnaceplans@... <mailto:furnaceplans%40hotmail.com> wrote:
                            >
                            > You buy hand tools
                            >
                            > Power tools make grasshoppper weak.
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            >

                            --
                            Barun Siegfried Sebastian Faust - Barony of Highland Foorde - Atlantia
                            http://hf.atlantia.sca.org/ - http://crossbows.biz/ - http://eliw.com/
                          • lawiser@att.net
                            Jim Hart wrote: I ve had just as many band-aid moments with hand tools. Maybe even more. IMO we tend to be more careful around power tools than hand tools.
                            Message 13 of 22 , Jan 11, 2011
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                              Jim Hart wrote:
                              "I've had just as many band-aid moments with hand tools."

                              Maybe even more. IMO we tend to be more careful around power tools than hand tools.

                              Lia



                              Sent from my Verizon Wireless BlackBerry
                            • Colleen Vince
                              Worst injury I have had was with an axe, the most painful with a drill press w/mortising attachment (ripped a finger nail clear out of the finger), most common
                              Message 14 of 22 , Jan 11, 2011
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                                Worst injury I have had was with an axe, the most painful with a drill press w/mortising attachment (ripped a finger nail clear out of the finger), most common are small nicks with the chisels, most annoying is glueing my fingers together with cyanoacrylate glue (happens depressingly often).


                                --
                                Mary Ostler    
                                Apprentice to Mistress Agnes Cresewyke
                                Lions Gate Game Marshal
                                www.maryostler.com
                              • Bill McNutt
                                My wife, the ER nurse, who has not done a scientific study, but formed a visceral impression sez: I see more injuries from hand tools. But those tend to
                                Message 15 of 22 , Jan 11, 2011
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                                  My wife, the ER nurse, who has not done a scientific study, but formed a visceral impression sez:

                                  “I see more injuries from hand tools. But those tend to involve stitches or splints.  When I DO see power tool injuries, they are more often amputations.”

                                   

                                  Will

                                   

                                  From: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com [mailto:medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of lawiser@...
                                  Sent: Tuesday, January 11, 2011 10:29 AM
                                  To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
                                  Subject: Re: [MedievalSawdust] Decisions decisions...

                                   

                                   

                                  Jim Hart wrote:
                                  "I've had just as many band-aid moments with hand tools."

                                  Maybe even more. IMO we tend to be more careful around power tools than hand tools.

                                  Lia

                                  Sent from my Verizon Wireless BlackBerry

                                • Bobby Bourgoin (Robert du Bourg)
                                  Sounds logical to me. Power tools, we are more careful with them (less injuries), cause they have more power, therefore greater injuries. Hands tools, we are
                                  Message 16 of 22 , Jan 11, 2011
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                                    Sounds logical to me…

                                    Power tools, we are more careful with them (less injuries), cause they have more power, therefore greater injuries…

                                    Hands tools, we are almost careless with them (more injuries), cause they have less power, therefore cause minor injuries…

                                     

                                    Seigneur Robert du Bourg

                                    bobby.bourgoin@...

                                    Bobby Bourgoin

                                     

                                    If I sing a song, will you sing along, or should I just keep singing right here by myself?

                                    If I tell you I’m strong, will you play along, or will you see I’m as insecure as anybody else?

                                    If I follow along, does it mean I belong, or will I keep on feeling different from everybody else?

                                                                                                            Sing Along – Blue Man Group

                                     

                                     


                                    From: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com [mailto: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com ] On Behalf Of Bill McNutt
                                    Sent: 11 janvier 2011 11:23
                                    To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
                                    Subject: RE: [MedievalSawdust] Decisions decisions...

                                     

                                     

                                    My wife, the ER nurse, who has not done a scientific study, but formed a visceral impression sez:

                                    “I see more injuries from hand tools. But those tend to involve stitches or splints.  When I DO see power tool injuries, they are more often amputations.”

                                     

                                    Will

                                     

                                    From: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com [mailto: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com ] On Behalf Of lawiser@...
                                    Sent: Tuesday, January 11, 2011 10:29 AM
                                    To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
                                    Subject: Re: [MedievalSawdust] Decisions decisions...

                                     

                                     

                                    Jim Hart wrote:
                                    "I've had just as many band-aid moments with hand tools."

                                    Maybe even more. IMO we tend to be more careful around power tools than hand tools.

                                    Lia

                                    Sent from my Verizon Wireless BlackBerry

                                  • scott gates
                                    I use a combination of both, and it has been the hand tools that get me the most wounds. I think some of t comes from having to provide the motive power and
                                    Message 17 of 22 , Jan 11, 2011
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                                      I use a combination of both, and it has been the hand tools that get me the most wounds. I think some of t comes from having to provide the motive power and the guidance.
                                      With the power tools I provide the guidance only. With power saw, remember a good blade like a 80 tooth Freud Diablo will make your inexpensive craftsman circular saw work like
                                      it is a contractor grade. Any saw you buy that comes with a blade, toss the blade, and buy a good one. It will cut your sanding time down too.

                                      Evil is, as Evil does





                                      To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com

                                    • conradh@efn.org
                                      ... Even mutilation is possible. I cut my thumb half off with a handsaw once! (A setup collapsed when I was sawing out a notch. The saw, the work, and I all
                                      Message 18 of 22 , Jan 11, 2011
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                                        On Tue, January 11, 2011 5:44 am, Jim Hart wrote:
                                        > I've had just as many band-aid moments with hand tools.
                                        >

                                        Even mutilation is possible. I cut my thumb half off with a handsaw once!
                                        (A setup collapsed when I was sawing out a notch. The saw, the work, and
                                        I all headed for the ground in a tangle, and the saw raked my thumb on the
                                        way down. Completely out of control.)

                                        Traditional adze work, where you strike just below your own foot, and hold
                                        the rising chip down with your toes to prevent tearout, has a potential
                                        for wounds that rivals a lot of power tools. Any kind of ax work, unless
                                        you make sure that no possible glance or breakout can sink the ax into
                                        meat, can be impressively bloody.

                                        OTOH, should the worst happen, the scars and mutilations are _authentic_.
                                        One of my biggest pleasures in hand tool woodworking is no worries about
                                        noise and fine dust. Except with a springpole lathe, you don't have to
                                        worry about cutting your own power cord.

                                        And, hand or power, the most important safety device is your brain. Don't
                                        let yours turn off!

                                        Ulfhedinn
                                      • Bill McNutt
                                        Yeah - and your brain is what turns off first when you re tired. Don t woodwork tired. It leads to injury. Will From: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
                                        Message 19 of 22 , Jan 11, 2011
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                                          Yeah – and your brain is what turns off first when you’re tired.

                                           

                                          Don’t woodwork tired.  It leads to injury.


                                          Will

                                           

                                          From: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com [mailto:medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of conradh@...
                                          Sent: Tuesday, January 11, 2011 3:26 PM
                                          To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
                                          Subject: Re: [MedievalSawdust] Decisions decisions...

                                           

                                           

                                          On Tue, January 11, 2011 5:44 am, Jim Hart wrote:

                                          > I've had just as many band-aid moments with hand tools.
                                          >

                                          Even mutilation is possible. I cut my thumb half off with a handsaw once!
                                          (A setup collapsed when I was sawing out a notch. The saw, the work, and
                                          I all headed for the ground in a tangle, and the saw raked my thumb on the
                                          way down. Completely out of control.)

                                          Traditional adze work, where you strike just below your own foot, and hold
                                          the rising chip down with your toes to prevent tearout, has a potential
                                          for wounds that rivals a lot of power tools. Any kind of ax work, unless
                                          you make sure that no possible glance or breakout can sink the ax into
                                          meat, can be impressively bloody.

                                          OTOH, should the worst happen, the scars and mutilations are _authentic_.
                                          One of my biggest pleasures in hand tool woodworking is no worries about
                                          noise and fine dust. Except with a springpole lathe, you don't have to
                                          worry about cutting your own power cord.

                                          And, hand or power, the most important safety device is your brain. Don't
                                          let yours turn off!

                                          Ulfhedinn

                                        • Siegfried
                                          I agree. Its why I play video games after my son goes to bed at 9pm instead of heading into the shop. I WANT to head into the shop. But i know I m too tired.
                                          Message 20 of 22 , Jan 11, 2011
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                                            I agree. Its why I play video games after my son goes to bed at 9pm instead of heading into the shop. I WANT to head into the shop. But i know I'm too tired. 

                                            Siegfried


                                            On Jan 11, 2011, at 3:44 PM, "Bill McNutt" <mcnutt@...> wrote:

                                            Yeah – and your brain is what turns off first when you’re tired.

                                             

                                            Don’t woodwork tired.  It leads to injury.


                                            Will

                                             

                                            From: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com [mailto:medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of conradh@...
                                            Sent: Tuesday, January 11, 2011 3:26 PM
                                            To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
                                            Subject: Re: [MedievalSawdust] Decisions decisions...

                                             

                                             

                                            On Tue, January 11, 2011 5:44 am, Jim Hart wrote:
                                            > I've had just as many band-aid moments with hand tools.
                                            >

                                            Even mutilation is possible. I cut my thumb half off with a handsaw once!
                                            (A setup collapsed when I was sawing out a notch. The saw, the work, and
                                            I all headed for the ground in a tangle, and the saw raked my thumb on the
                                            way down. Completely out of control.)

                                            Traditional adze work, where you strike just below your own foot, and hold
                                            the rising chip down with your toes to prevent tearout, has a potential
                                            for wounds that rivals a lot of power tools. Any kind of ax work, unless
                                            you make sure that no possible glance or breakout can sink the ax into
                                            meat, can be impressively bloody.

                                            OTOH, should the worst happen, the scars and mutilations are _authentic_.
                                            One of my biggest pleasures in hand tool woodworking is no worries about
                                            noise and fine dust. Except with a springpole lathe, you don't have to
                                            worry about cutting your own power cord.

                                            And, hand or power, the most important safety device is your brain. Don't
                                            let yours turn off!

                                            Ulfhedinn

                                          • kelly O'Sullivan
                                            Hi All, I m Kelly and hale from the Shire of Heychister. I m an apprentice wooden boat builder in Mundaina, and have learn to have a no important desion after
                                            Message 21 of 22 , Jan 11, 2011
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                                              Hi All,
                                               
                                              I'm Kelly and hale from the Shire of Heychister. I'm an apprentice wooden boat builder in Mundaina, and have learn to have a no important desion after 4:30 rule becasue of the tiredness factor. I've manged to do really good smeg up because of this. Some of my best injurys have been with my Japanees saw. It slip one time while I was triming the inwhale and took a gouge out of my thumb.
                                               
                                              The SCA realted progect I'm working on is the knif for my feast gear. There are some really nice ascpets to it like how the blade is shaped and a nice long tang but the handle is a piece of junk so I've descided too go Frankenstien on it and make a better looking one out of wood. I've got oak for it, is that accptable as a wood?
                                               
                                              Kelly


                                              From: Siegfried <siegfried@...>
                                              To: "medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com" <medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com>
                                              Cc: "<medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com>" <medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com>
                                              Sent: Tue, January 11, 2011 6:23:03 PM
                                              Subject: Re: [MedievalSawdust] Decisions decisions...

                                               

                                              I agree. Its why I play video games after my son goes to bed at 9pm instead of heading into the shop. I WANT to head into the shop. But i know I'm too tired. 

                                              Siegfried


                                              On Jan 11, 2011, at 3:44 PM, "Bill McNutt" <mcnutt@...> wrote:

                                              Yeah – and your brain is what turns off first when you’re tired.

                                               

                                              Don’t woodwork tired.  It leads to injury.


                                              Will

                                               

                                              From: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com [mailto:medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of conradh@...
                                              Sent: Tuesday, January 11, 2011 3:26 PM
                                              To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
                                              Subject: Re: [MedievalSawdust] Decisions decisions...

                                               

                                               

                                              On Tue, January 11, 2011 5:44 am, Jim Hart wrote:
                                              > I've had just as many band-aid moments with hand tools.
                                              >

                                              Even mutilation is possible. I cut my thumb half off with a handsaw once!
                                              (A setup collapsed when I was sawing out a notch. The saw, the work, and
                                              I all headed for the ground in a tangle, and the saw raked my thumb on the
                                              way down. Completely out of control.)

                                              Traditional adze work, where you strike just below your own foot, and hold
                                              the rising chip down with your toes to prevent tearout, has a potential
                                              for wounds that rivals a lot of power tools. Any kind of ax work, unless
                                              you make sure that no possible glance or breakout can sink the ax into
                                              meat, can be impressively bloody.

                                              OTOH, should the worst happen, the scars and mutilations are _authentic_.
                                              One of my biggest pleasures in hand tool woodworking is no worries about
                                              noise and fine dust. Except with a springpole lathe, you don't have to
                                              worry about cutting your own power cord.

                                              And, hand or power, the most important safety device is your brain. Don't
                                              let yours turn off!

                                              Ulfhedinn


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