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Re: [MedievalSawdust] Making a Medieval Loom (or Spinning Wheel)?

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  • conradh@efn.org
    Milord Symon-- A somewhat outside the box suggestion here: I haven t build a loom or wheel, but I ve seen them built. I _have_ built a lathe, and it s
    Message 1 of 21 , Dec 30, 2010
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      Milord Symon--

      A somewhat "outside the box" suggestion here: I haven't build a loom or
      wheel, but I've seen them built. I _have_ built a lathe, and it's easier
      and takes up less room than a loom! They are also easy to learn to use,
      compared to almost any other major tool.

      You can make a perfectly good lathe (period spring-pole or bow lathe, or
      modern with a salvaged appliance motor) out of scrap lumber or raw tree
      parts for that matter. English chair bodgers used to walk into the woods
      with a few hand tools and a pocket full of simple hardware and improvise a
      lathe that was good enough for professional chair making. I built a
      spring-pole lathe without spending a dime, and it worked well for many
      years. It was so easy to use that we had eight-year-olds doing basic
      spindle turning with scraper tools in a matter of minutes at many demos.
      (Our rule was that if you were tall enough to see over the lathe bed, we
      could teach you to use it.)

      Check out www.bodgers.org.uk

      Their "ask and answers" section has a wealth of information including all
      sorts of illustrated how-to's, and the people there are very friendly and
      helpful.

      Consider picking up another cool period craft and tool--I've enjoyed it
      and found it very useful!

      Ulfhedinn
    • Hall, Hayward
      Obviously this is a good excuse for you to build a period lathe first... Guillaume ... From: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
      Message 2 of 21 , Jan 3, 2011
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        Obviously this is a good excuse for you to build a period lathe first...

        Guillaume

        -----Original Message-----
        From: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com [mailto:medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Sean Powell
        Sent: Wednesday, December 29, 2010 6:28 PM
        To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: [MedievalSawdust] Making a Medieval Loom (or Spinning Wheel)?

        > many of those parts need to be built on a lathe which I don't
        own.
      • Kristine Elliott
        On Wed, Dec 29, 2010 at 7:28 PM, Sean Powell wrote: ... That s Scotch tension, If you are thinking of making a PERIOD
        Message 3 of 21 , Jan 4, 2011
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          On Wed, Dec 29, 2010 at 7:28 PM, Sean Powell <powell.sean@...> wrote:

          <snip>
          >     Spinning wheels are surprisingly sophisticated, especially the ones
          > with 'scotch action' or whatever that use friction to pull in the woven
          > thread and many of those parts need to be built on a lathe which I don't
          > own.
          <snip>

          That's Scotch tension, If you are thinking of making a PERIOD spinning
          wheel, you've got quite a bit of research ahead of you. I've been
          doing research on them for several years, though of course I don't
          have a woodworker's eye.

          Scolastica
          --
          If you can't get rid of them ugly old skeletons in the closet, at least teach
          'em how to dance funny.  Billy C. Wirtz
        • Kristine Elliott
          ... There s a Home Textile Tool Museum up in Orwell, PA that has a bunch of colonial era and later looms. Not medieval, but a lot older than one usually sees.
          Message 4 of 21 , Jan 4, 2011
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            On Wed, Dec 29, 2010 at 7:28 PM, Sean Powell <powell.sean@...> wrote:

            > before? Has anyone built an authentic replica of a period loom before?
            > (15thC preferred) Does anyone have any pictures, books, plans, drawings,
            > concepts, or off-the wall hallucinations about building a period loom
            > that they would want to share? Does anyone think building a loom from
            > scratch is an incredibly silly idea? Does anyone think it would be
            > easier to build a spinning wheel instead?

            There's a Home Textile Tool Museum up in Orwell, PA that has a bunch
            of colonial era and later looms. Not medieval, but a lot older than
            one usually sees. These are massive looms made for weaving coverlets
            and such. Here is the museum website:
            http://www.hometextiletoolmuseum.org/ . There is also a lovely old
            woodshop there that has a treadle lathe you might want to look at.

            My impression when I visited the museum was that it was underfunded
            and run by volunteers. If I were you, I would call ahead and try to
            make sure that the day you go there are guides there knowledgeable in
            the areas you are particularly interested in.

            Scolastica


            --
            If you can't get rid of them ugly old skeletons in the closet, at least teach
            'em how to dance funny.  Billy C. Wirtz
          • Beth & Bob Matney
            Here are some interesting illustrations from: Kaminska, Janina, and Adam Nahlik. Wlókiennictwo Gdanskie w X-XIII wieku. 1958. 261 p. illus. (part col.) 24 cm.
            Message 5 of 21 , Jan 4, 2011
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              Here are some interesting illustrations from:
              Kaminska, Janina, and Adam Nahlik. Wlókiennictwo
              Gdanskie w X-XIII wieku. 1958. 261 p. illus.
              (part col.) 24 cm. OCLC Number: 4794324, etc.
              Summary in French and Russian
              http://www.worldcat.org/title/wokiennictwo-gdanskie-w-x-xiii-wieku/oclc/4794324
              ebook http://books.google.com/books?id=ri0ZAAAAIAAJ
              images http://gallowglass.org/jadwiga/pictures/nahlik/gdansk/index.htm

              especially
              http://gallowglass.org/jadwiga/pictures/nahlik/gdansk/pages/ryc38_jpg.htm
              http://gallowglass.org/jadwiga/pictures/nahlik/gdansk/pages/ryc39_jpg.htm
              http://gallowglass.org/jadwiga/pictures/nahlik/gdansk/pages/ryc12_jpg.htm
              http://gallowglass.org/jadwiga/pictures/nahlik/gdansk/pages/ryc13_jpg.htm
              http://gallowglass.org/jadwiga/pictures/nahlik/gdansk/pages/ryc13a_jpg.htm

              Beth

              At 10:36 AM 1/4/2011, you wrote:
              >On Wed, Dec 29, 2010 at 7:28 PM, Sean Powell
              ><<mailto:powell.sean%40comcast.net>powell.sean@...> wrote:
              >
              > > before? Has anyone built an authentic replica of a period loom before?
              > > (15thC preferred) Does anyone have any pictures, books, plans, drawings,
              > > concepts, or off-the wall hallucinations about building a period loom
              > > that they would want to share? Does anyone think building a loom from
              > > scratch is an incredibly silly idea? Does anyone think it would be
              > > easier to build a spinning wheel instead?
              >
              >There's a Home Textile Tool Museum up in Orwell, PA that has a bunch
              >of colonial era and later looms. Not medieval, but a lot older than
              >one usually sees. These are massive looms made for weaving coverlets
              >and such. Here is the museum website:
              ><http://www.hometextiletoolmuseum.org/>http://www.hometextiletoolmuseum.org/
              >. There is also a lovely old
              >woodshop there that has a treadle lathe you might want to look at.
              >
              >My impression when I visited the museum was that it was underfunded
              >and run by volunteers. If I were you, I would call ahead and try to
              >make sure that the day you go there are guides there knowledgeable in
              >the areas you are particularly interested in.
              >
              >Scolastica
            • D. Young
              Im not usually one for machines but am working on my kitchen renovation so routers do come in handy...and I stumbled across these
              Message 6 of 21 , Jan 4, 2011
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                Im not usually one for machines but am working on my kitchen renovation so routers do come in handy...and I stumbled across these

                http://www.infinitytools.com/17th-Century-Molding-Router-Bits/products/1421/






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