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Wood Identification Question

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  • Jim Hart
    Do you think you can identify what kind of wood this is? http://i147.photobucket.com/albums/r295/ConalOhAirt/drool/Woodsample001.jpg I have provided a
    Message 1 of 21 , Dec 23, 2010
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      Do you think you can identify what kind of wood this is?



      I have provided a hint.......


      ( I was bored at work today and my mind started to wander a bit..... sorry )




    • Royce
      Does it matter? It s all relative. Bercilak From: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com [mailto:medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Jim Hart Sent:
      Message 2 of 21 , Dec 23, 2010
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        Does it matter? It’s all relative…

         

        Bercilak

         

        From: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com [mailto:medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Jim Hart
        Sent: Thursday, December 23, 2010 1:14 PM
        To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: [MedievalSawdust] Wood Identification Question

         

         

        Do you think you can identify what kind of wood this is?

         

         

         

        I have provided a hint.......

         

         

        ( I was bored at work today and my mind started to wander a bit..... sorry )

         

         

         

         

      • D. Young
        Jack Hole Duh Relativity. ....something like asshole, duh, its all relative. Now in all seriousness...its kinda hard because the photo is sort of
        Message 3 of 21 , Dec 23, 2010
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          Jack
          Hole
          Duh
          Relativity.

          ....something like


          "asshole, duh, its all relative."


          Now in all seriousness...its kinda hard because the photo is sort of snowy...white out.





          Fine Armour and Historical Reproductions

               Custom Commissions Welcome....!

          www.partsandtechnical.com
          (Well Formed Munitions Catalog Coming This Spring)
           





          To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
          From: conalohairt@...
          Date: Thu, 23 Dec 2010 16:14:00 -0500
          Subject: [MedievalSawdust] Wood Identification Question

           
          Do you think you can identify what kind of wood this is?



          I have provided a hint.......


          ( I was bored at work today and my mind started to wander a bit..... sorry )





        • D. Young
          Thought you all might find this interesting. Its a piece of molding that has broken off, revealing the nails inside. I was interested in the nail shape,
          Message 4 of 21 , Dec 23, 2010
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            Thought you all might find this interesting.    Its a piece of molding that has broken off, revealing the nails inside.   I was interested in the nail shape, depth, etc.

            Probably have to copy/paste:

            http://bridgesovertime.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/05/Blanket8.jpg

            http://bridgesovertime.com/18th-century-6-board-blanket-chest/



            Merry Christmas
            cheers
            Drew





            Fine Armour and Historical Reproductions

                 Custom Commissions Welcome....!

            www.partsandtechnical.com
            (Well Formed Munitions Catalog Coming This Spring)
             





            To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
            From: furnaceplans@...
            Date: Thu, 23 Dec 2010 17:46:42 -0500
            Subject: RE: [MedievalSawdust] Wood Identification Question

             
            Jack
            Hole
            Duh
            Relativity.

            ....something like


            "asshole, duh, its all relative."


            Now in all seriousness...its kinda hard because the photo is sort of snowy...white out.






            Fine Armour and Historical Reproductions

                 Custom Commissions Welcome....!

            www.partsandtechnical.com
            (Well Formed Munitions Catalog Coming This Spring)
             





            To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
            From: conalohairt@...
            Date: Thu, 23 Dec 2010 16:14:00 -0500
            Subject: [MedievalSawdust] Wood Identification Question

             
            Do you think you can identify what kind of wood this is?



            I have provided a hint.......


            ( I was bored at work today and my mind started to wander a bit..... sorry )






          • bsrlee
            If you look closely at the shank of the exposed nails you can see that they appear to be machine made from wire stock, just like the currently available cut
            Message 5 of 21 , Dec 23, 2010
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              If you look closely at the shank of the exposed nails you can see that
              they appear to be machine made from wire stock, just like the currently
              available 'cut nails' from Tremont and others.

              regards
              Brusi of Orkney
              Rowany/Lochac

              On 24/12/2010 11:04 AM, D. Young wrote:
              >
              >
              > Thought you all might find this interesting. Its a piece of molding that
              > has broken off, revealing the nails inside. I was interested in the nail
              > shape, depth, etc.
              >
              > Probably have to copy/paste:
              >
              > http://bridgesovertime.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/05/Blanket8.jpg
              >
              > http://bridgesovertime.com/18th-century-6-board-blanket-chest/
              >
              >
              >
              > Merry Christmas
              > cheers
              > Drew
            • D. Young
              Hard to say Brusi Ive seen so many period nails that I see hand forging clues and some things that suggest cut nails also. If it was made circa 1700 as
              Message 6 of 21 , Dec 23, 2010
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                Hard to say Brusi

                Ive seen so many period nails that I see hand forging clues and some things that suggest cut nails also.

                If it was made circa 1700 as purported theyd be forged.   If it was later than mid 19th century they might be cut nails.

                Problem with dating such simple (albeit elegant chests) is that they were bloody ubiquitous ...a late 19th century chest could look 16th century.

                Only close examination would tell us: paint, hardward, type of wood, riven or sawn etc.    From the description I have no idea of how verifiable the 18th century date is.





                Fine Armour and Historical Reproductions

                     Custom Commissions Welcome....!

                www.partsandtechnical.com
                (Well Formed Munitions Catalog Coming This Spring)
                 




                > To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
                > From: bsrlee2@...
                > Date: Fri, 24 Dec 2010 12:37:41 +1100
                > Subject: Re: [MedievalSawdust] a revealing look into nailed wood
                >
                > If you look closely at the shank of the exposed nails you can see that
                > they appear to be machine made from wire stock, just like the currently
                > available 'cut nails' from Tremont and others.
                >
                > regards
                > Brusi of Orkney
                > Rowany/Lochac
                >
                > On 24/12/2010 11:04 AM, D. Young wrote:
                > >
                > >
                > > Thought you all might find this interesting. Its a piece of molding that
                > > has broken off, revealing the nails inside. I was interested in the nail
                > > shape, depth, etc.
                > >
                > > Probably have to copy/paste:
                > >
                > > http://bridgesovertime.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/05/Blanket8.jpg
                > >
                > > http://bridgesovertime.com/18th-century-6-board-blanket-chest/
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > > Merry Christmas
                > > cheers
                > > Drew
                >
                >
                >
                > ------------------------------------
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              • bsrlee
                And of course, there is nothing to stop someone nailing a loose bit of edging back on with whatever nails were at hand. There are a few pieces in books that,
                Message 7 of 21 , Dec 24, 2010
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                  And of course, there is nothing to stop someone nailing a loose bit of
                  edging back on with whatever nails were at hand.

                  There are a few pieces in books that, when compared to other, similar,
                  surviving pieces, seem to have been made from bits that came from an
                  even earlier construction, turned upside down, trimmed & reassembled
                  into something else - all done 400 years ago with boards that were old &
                  worn then.

                  regards
                  Brusi

                  On 24/12/2010 3:49 PM, D. Young wrote:
                  >
                  >
                  > Hard to say Brusi
                  >
                  > Ive seen so many period nails that I see hand forging clues and some
                  > things that suggest cut nails also.
                  >
                  > If it was made circa 1700 as purported theyd be forged. If it was later
                  > than mid 19th century they might be cut nails.
                  >
                  > Problem with dating such simple (albeit elegant chests) is that they
                  > were bloody ubiquitous ...a late 19th century chest could look 16th century.
                  >
                  > Only close examination would tell us: paint, hardward, type of wood,
                  > riven or sawn etc. From the description I have no idea of how verifiable
                  > the 18th century date is.
                • betty
                  Fellows, It is obvious to me that the nails are forged and not cut. Forged nails generally taper on all four sides. Cut nails are uniform in thickness and
                  Message 8 of 21 , Dec 25, 2010
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                    Fellows,
                    It is obvious to me that the nails are forged and not cut. Forged nails generally taper on all four sides. Cut nails are uniform in thickness and taper only on the opposing two sides. Take a look at Tremont's site.
                    yours, Russ.
                  • Sean Powell
                    Hello, My wife has been on a spinning and weaving kick of late. She does most of her spinning on a series of drop spindles but is pricing out buying a modern
                    Message 9 of 21 , Dec 29, 2010
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                      Hello,
                      My wife has been on a spinning and weaving kick of late. She does
                      most of her spinning on a series of drop spindles but is pricing out
                      buying a modern travel loom. She is also working with a small 4-harness
                      table/lap loom that she owns and an 8 harness table-top that is
                      borrowed. The larger 8-harness will need to be returned this spring.
                      Spinning wheels are surprisingly sophisticated, especially the ones
                      with 'scotch action' or whatever that use friction to pull in the woven
                      thread and many of those parts need to be built on a lathe which I don't
                      own.
                      Looms on the other hand are bulky frames with frames of headles and
                      reeds moving in rather simple ways. The cost should be in the headles
                      and reeds but most looms use modern mass produced pieces to keep costs
                      'down'. By down that means more then a professional cabinet saw!!! The
                      SCAdian in me is jumping up and down going 'I could BUILD that!' but I'm
                      not certain where to start. My wife has hundreds of books dedicated to
                      fashion, fabric, and occasionally weaving but nothing provides enough
                      detail to design a loom from scratch. There really isn't much point in
                      designing one from scratch either as so many examples exist.
                      So, (Other then warp-weighted looms) Has anyone here build a loom
                      before? Has anyone built an authentic replica of a period loom before?
                      (15thC preferred) Does anyone have any pictures, books, plans, drawings,
                      concepts, or off-the wall hallucinations about building a period loom
                      that they would want to share? Does anyone think building a loom from
                      scratch is an incredibly silly idea? Does anyone think it would be
                      easier to build a spinning wheel instead?
                      I'm at the early concept stage and just starting my research. While
                      I intend to do my own research there is a lot to be said for asking
                      experts for their thoughts and experience as well so please feel free to
                      tell me I'm being too vague or chime in with whatever general newbie
                      responses are appropriate.
                      Thanks in advance,
                      Sean Powell (Symon de Poitiers)
                    • Michael Tighe
                      I didn t get this... Could someone please enlighten a poor addle-brained not-quite-good woodworker? -- Michael Tighe (tighe@rcn.com)
                      Message 10 of 21 , Dec 29, 2010
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                        I didn't get this... Could someone please enlighten
                        a poor addle-brained not-quite-good woodworker?

                        -- Michael Tighe (tighe@...)


                        ---- Original message ----
                        >Date: Thu, 23 Dec 2010 16:14:00 -0500
                        >From: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com (on behalf of Jim Hart <conalohairt@...>)
                        >Subject: [MedievalSawdust] Wood Identification Question
                        >To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        > Do you think you can identify what kind of wood this
                        > is?
                        > http://i147.photobucket.com/albums/r295/ConalOhAirt/drool/Woodsample001.jpg
                        > I have provided a hint.......
                        > ( I was bored at work today and my mind started to
                        > wander a bit..... sorry )
                        >
                        >
                      • kirkdrago
                        My lady also want me to make her a loom sometime in the not too distant future. I ve done some searching, and here s a website that might help.
                        Message 11 of 21 , Dec 30, 2010
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                          My lady also want me to make her a loom sometime in the not too distant future. I've done some searching, and here's a website that might help.

                          http://www.cd3wd.com/cd3wd_40/vita/handloom/en/handloom.htm

                          Kirk Dragomani
                        • mejnoona
                          If you re interested in making a Medieval syle spinning wheel, Interweave s SpinOff community has a free PDF on buidling a little great wheel (a spindle wheel)
                          Message 12 of 21 , Dec 30, 2010
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                            If you're interested in making a Medieval syle spinning wheel, Interweave's SpinOff community has a free PDF on buidling a little great wheel (a spindle wheel) that does not require a lathe.

                            http://www.spinningdaily.com/media/p/138.aspx

                            You have to sign up for their site, but there is no charge to do so.

                            I believe there are also a couple of books out about no-lathe spinning wheel construction (however, I don't own them and cannot comment). Remember that treadle spinning wheels are a rather late addition. Most pictorial evidence of spinning wheels in medieval periods are for this typle of spindle wheel or charkha.

                            When I started weaving, I couldn't afford the equipment. So I have built looms of varying types and complexities over the years from a simple frame loom to a variant of hand manipulated harness loom. It is very do-able and there are lots of plans out there to help. While I now have commercially constructed harness looms, I still make most of the accessories for them.

                            Good luck, and keep us up on your progress!

                            Asa
                          • Beth & Bob Matney
                            A commercial headle is not necessary.. no modern metal ones have been found in the archaeology. It is tedious, but not hard to make string headles, and
                            Message 13 of 21 , Dec 30, 2010
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                              A commercial headle is not necessary.. no modern metal ones have been
                              found in the archaeology. <smile> It is tedious, but not hard to make
                              string headles, and a reed is even easier.. even a modern one is only
                              a series of stiff wires soldered in place.

                              Somewhere in my books, I have a photo of an existing 16th C loom
                              frame. Many horizontal loom parts are found in the archaeology for
                              Novgorod, Paladru (France) and Waterford (Ireland) dating back into the 12thC.

                              Two books that you will find interesting are

                              Fannin, Allen. Handloom weaving technology (1998) ISBN 155821612X

                              Becker, John. Pattern and Loom/With Supplement (1988) ISBN 1988 8772451513
                              The Second Edition, 2009 is available for free download
                              http://www.staff.hum.ku.dk/dbwagner/Pattern-and-Loom.html

                              A list of books that I have on the subject is here
                              http://www.librarything.com/catalog/Castlegrounds&deepsearch=loom

                              Beth Matney

                              At 06:28 PM 12/29/2010, you wrote:
                              >
                              >Hello,
                              >My wife has been on a spinning and weaving kick of late. She does
                              >most of her spinning on a series of drop spindles but is pricing out
                              >buying a modern travel loom. She is also working with a small 4-harness
                              >table/lap loom that she owns and an 8 harness table-top that is
                              >borrowed. The larger 8-harness will need to be returned this spring.
                              >Spinning wheels are surprisingly sophisticated, especially the ones
                              >with 'scotch action' or whatever that use friction to pull in the woven
                              >thread and many of those parts need to be built on a lathe which I don't
                              >own.
                              >Looms on the other hand are bulky frames with frames of headles and
                              >reeds moving in rather simple ways. The cost should be in the headles
                              >and reeds but most looms use modern mass produced pieces to keep costs
                              >'down'. By down that means more then a professional cabinet saw!!! The
                              >SCAdian in me is jumping up and down going 'I could BUILD that!' but I'm
                              >not certain where to start. My wife has hundreds of books dedicated to
                              >fashion, fabric, and occasionally weaving but nothing provides enough
                              >detail to design a loom from scratch. There really isn't much point in
                              >designing one from scratch either as so many examples exist.
                              >So, (Other then warp-weighted looms) Has anyone here build a loom
                              >before? Has anyone built an authentic replica of a period loom before?
                              >(15thC preferred) Does anyone have any pictures, books, plans, drawings,
                              >concepts, or off-the wall hallucinations about building a period loom
                              >that they would want to share? Does anyone think building a loom from
                              >scratch is an incredibly silly idea? Does anyone think it would be
                              >easier to build a spinning wheel instead?
                              >I'm at the early concept stage and just starting my research. While
                              >I intend to do my own research there is a lot to be said for asking
                              >experts for their thoughts and experience as well so please feel free to
                              >tell me I'm being too vague or chime in with whatever general newbie
                              >responses are appropriate.
                              >Thanks in advance,
                              >Sean Powell (Symon de Poitiers)
                            • David
                              Are you looking for a portable loom or a standing loom? I ve been working on some plans for a small floor loom that holds together with tusked tenons.
                              Message 14 of 21 , Dec 30, 2010
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                                Are you looking for a portable loom or a standing loom? I've been working on some plans for a small floor loom that holds together with tusked tenons.

                                --- In medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com, Sean Powell <powell.sean@...> wrote:
                                >
                                > Hello,
                                > My wife has been on a spinning and weaving kick of late. She does
                                > most of her spinning on a series of drop spindles but is pricing out
                                > buying a modern travel loom. She is also working with a small 4-harness
                                > table/lap loom that she owns and an 8 harness table-top that is
                                > borrowed. The larger 8-harness will need to be returned this spring.
                                > Spinning wheels are surprisingly sophisticated, especially the ones
                                > with 'scotch action' or whatever that use friction to pull in the woven
                                > thread and many of those parts need to be built on a lathe which I don't
                                > own.
                                > Looms on the other hand are bulky frames with frames of headles and
                                > reeds moving in rather simple ways. The cost should be in the headles
                                > and reeds but most looms use modern mass produced pieces to keep costs
                                > 'down'. By down that means more then a professional cabinet saw!!! The
                                > SCAdian in me is jumping up and down going 'I could BUILD that!' but I'm
                                > not certain where to start. My wife has hundreds of books dedicated to
                                > fashion, fabric, and occasionally weaving but nothing provides enough
                                > detail to design a loom from scratch. There really isn't much point in
                                > designing one from scratch either as so many examples exist.
                                > So, (Other then warp-weighted looms) Has anyone here build a loom
                                > before? Has anyone built an authentic replica of a period loom before?
                                > (15thC preferred) Does anyone have any pictures, books, plans, drawings,
                                > concepts, or off-the wall hallucinations about building a period loom
                                > that they would want to share? Does anyone think building a loom from
                                > scratch is an incredibly silly idea? Does anyone think it would be
                                > easier to build a spinning wheel instead?
                                > I'm at the early concept stage and just starting my research. While
                                > I intend to do my own research there is a lot to be said for asking
                                > experts for their thoughts and experience as well so please feel free to
                                > tell me I'm being too vague or chime in with whatever general newbie
                                > responses are appropriate.
                                > Thanks in advance,
                                > Sean Powell (Symon de Poitiers)
                                >
                              • conradh@efn.org
                                Message 15 of 21 , Dec 30, 2010
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                                  On Wed, December 29, 2010 4:28 pm, Sean Powell wrote:
                                  > Hello,
                                  > My wife has been on a spinning and weaving kick of late. She does
                                  > most of her spinning on a series of drop spindles but is pricing out buying
                                  > a modern travel loom. She is also working with a small 4-harness table/lap
                                  > loom that she owns and an 8 harness table-top that is borrowed. The larger
                                  > 8-harness will need to be returned this spring.
                                  > Spinning wheels are surprisingly sophisticated, especially the ones
                                  > with 'scotch action' or whatever that use friction to pull in the woven
                                  > thread and many of those parts need to be built on a lathe which I don't
                                  > own. Looms on the other hand are bulky frames with frames of headles and
                                  > reeds moving in rather simple ways. The cost should be in the headles and
                                  > reeds but most looms use modern mass produced pieces to keep costs 'down'.
                                  > By down that means more then a professional cabinet saw!!! The
                                  > SCAdian in me is jumping up and down going 'I could BUILD that!' but I'm
                                  > not certain where to start. My wife has hundreds of books dedicated to
                                  > fashion, fabric, and occasionally weaving but nothing provides enough
                                  > detail to design a loom from scratch. There really isn't much point in
                                  > designing one from scratch either as so many examples exist. So, (Other
                                  > then warp-weighted looms) Has anyone here build a loom before? Has anyone
                                  > built an authentic replica of a period loom before? (15thC preferred) Does
                                  > anyone have any pictures, books, plans, drawings, concepts, or off-the
                                  > wall hallucinations about building a period loom that they would want to
                                  > share? Does anyone think building a loom from scratch is an incredibly
                                  > silly idea? Does anyone think it would be easier to build a spinning wheel
                                  > instead? I'm at the early concept stage and just starting my research.
                                  > While
                                  > I intend to do my own research there is a lot to be said for asking
                                  > experts for their thoughts and experience as well so please feel free to
                                  > tell me I'm being too vague or chime in with whatever general newbie
                                  > responses are appropriate. Thanks in advance,
                                  > Sean Powell (Symon de Poitiers)
                                  >
                                  >
                                • conradh@efn.org
                                  Milord Symon-- A somewhat outside the box suggestion here: I haven t build a loom or wheel, but I ve seen them built. I _have_ built a lathe, and it s
                                  Message 16 of 21 , Dec 30, 2010
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                                    Milord Symon--

                                    A somewhat "outside the box" suggestion here: I haven't build a loom or
                                    wheel, but I've seen them built. I _have_ built a lathe, and it's easier
                                    and takes up less room than a loom! They are also easy to learn to use,
                                    compared to almost any other major tool.

                                    You can make a perfectly good lathe (period spring-pole or bow lathe, or
                                    modern with a salvaged appliance motor) out of scrap lumber or raw tree
                                    parts for that matter. English chair bodgers used to walk into the woods
                                    with a few hand tools and a pocket full of simple hardware and improvise a
                                    lathe that was good enough for professional chair making. I built a
                                    spring-pole lathe without spending a dime, and it worked well for many
                                    years. It was so easy to use that we had eight-year-olds doing basic
                                    spindle turning with scraper tools in a matter of minutes at many demos.
                                    (Our rule was that if you were tall enough to see over the lathe bed, we
                                    could teach you to use it.)

                                    Check out www.bodgers.org.uk

                                    Their "ask and answers" section has a wealth of information including all
                                    sorts of illustrated how-to's, and the people there are very friendly and
                                    helpful.

                                    Consider picking up another cool period craft and tool--I've enjoyed it
                                    and found it very useful!

                                    Ulfhedinn
                                  • Hall, Hayward
                                    Obviously this is a good excuse for you to build a period lathe first... Guillaume ... From: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
                                    Message 17 of 21 , Jan 3, 2011
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                                      Obviously this is a good excuse for you to build a period lathe first...

                                      Guillaume

                                      -----Original Message-----
                                      From: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com [mailto:medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Sean Powell
                                      Sent: Wednesday, December 29, 2010 6:28 PM
                                      To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
                                      Subject: [MedievalSawdust] Making a Medieval Loom (or Spinning Wheel)?

                                      > many of those parts need to be built on a lathe which I don't
                                      own.
                                    • Kristine Elliott
                                      On Wed, Dec 29, 2010 at 7:28 PM, Sean Powell wrote: ... That s Scotch tension, If you are thinking of making a PERIOD
                                      Message 18 of 21 , Jan 4, 2011
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                                        On Wed, Dec 29, 2010 at 7:28 PM, Sean Powell <powell.sean@...> wrote:

                                        <snip>
                                        >     Spinning wheels are surprisingly sophisticated, especially the ones
                                        > with 'scotch action' or whatever that use friction to pull in the woven
                                        > thread and many of those parts need to be built on a lathe which I don't
                                        > own.
                                        <snip>

                                        That's Scotch tension, If you are thinking of making a PERIOD spinning
                                        wheel, you've got quite a bit of research ahead of you. I've been
                                        doing research on them for several years, though of course I don't
                                        have a woodworker's eye.

                                        Scolastica
                                        --
                                        If you can't get rid of them ugly old skeletons in the closet, at least teach
                                        'em how to dance funny.  Billy C. Wirtz
                                      • Kristine Elliott
                                        ... There s a Home Textile Tool Museum up in Orwell, PA that has a bunch of colonial era and later looms. Not medieval, but a lot older than one usually sees.
                                        Message 19 of 21 , Jan 4, 2011
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                                          On Wed, Dec 29, 2010 at 7:28 PM, Sean Powell <powell.sean@...> wrote:

                                          > before? Has anyone built an authentic replica of a period loom before?
                                          > (15thC preferred) Does anyone have any pictures, books, plans, drawings,
                                          > concepts, or off-the wall hallucinations about building a period loom
                                          > that they would want to share? Does anyone think building a loom from
                                          > scratch is an incredibly silly idea? Does anyone think it would be
                                          > easier to build a spinning wheel instead?

                                          There's a Home Textile Tool Museum up in Orwell, PA that has a bunch
                                          of colonial era and later looms. Not medieval, but a lot older than
                                          one usually sees. These are massive looms made for weaving coverlets
                                          and such. Here is the museum website:
                                          http://www.hometextiletoolmuseum.org/ . There is also a lovely old
                                          woodshop there that has a treadle lathe you might want to look at.

                                          My impression when I visited the museum was that it was underfunded
                                          and run by volunteers. If I were you, I would call ahead and try to
                                          make sure that the day you go there are guides there knowledgeable in
                                          the areas you are particularly interested in.

                                          Scolastica


                                          --
                                          If you can't get rid of them ugly old skeletons in the closet, at least teach
                                          'em how to dance funny.  Billy C. Wirtz
                                        • Beth & Bob Matney
                                          Here are some interesting illustrations from: Kaminska, Janina, and Adam Nahlik. Wlókiennictwo Gdanskie w X-XIII wieku. 1958. 261 p. illus. (part col.) 24 cm.
                                          Message 20 of 21 , Jan 4, 2011
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                                            Here are some interesting illustrations from:
                                            Kaminska, Janina, and Adam Nahlik. Wlókiennictwo
                                            Gdanskie w X-XIII wieku. 1958. 261 p. illus.
                                            (part col.) 24 cm. OCLC Number: 4794324, etc.
                                            Summary in French and Russian
                                            http://www.worldcat.org/title/wokiennictwo-gdanskie-w-x-xiii-wieku/oclc/4794324
                                            ebook http://books.google.com/books?id=ri0ZAAAAIAAJ
                                            images http://gallowglass.org/jadwiga/pictures/nahlik/gdansk/index.htm

                                            especially
                                            http://gallowglass.org/jadwiga/pictures/nahlik/gdansk/pages/ryc38_jpg.htm
                                            http://gallowglass.org/jadwiga/pictures/nahlik/gdansk/pages/ryc39_jpg.htm
                                            http://gallowglass.org/jadwiga/pictures/nahlik/gdansk/pages/ryc12_jpg.htm
                                            http://gallowglass.org/jadwiga/pictures/nahlik/gdansk/pages/ryc13_jpg.htm
                                            http://gallowglass.org/jadwiga/pictures/nahlik/gdansk/pages/ryc13a_jpg.htm

                                            Beth

                                            At 10:36 AM 1/4/2011, you wrote:
                                            >On Wed, Dec 29, 2010 at 7:28 PM, Sean Powell
                                            ><<mailto:powell.sean%40comcast.net>powell.sean@...> wrote:
                                            >
                                            > > before? Has anyone built an authentic replica of a period loom before?
                                            > > (15thC preferred) Does anyone have any pictures, books, plans, drawings,
                                            > > concepts, or off-the wall hallucinations about building a period loom
                                            > > that they would want to share? Does anyone think building a loom from
                                            > > scratch is an incredibly silly idea? Does anyone think it would be
                                            > > easier to build a spinning wheel instead?
                                            >
                                            >There's a Home Textile Tool Museum up in Orwell, PA that has a bunch
                                            >of colonial era and later looms. Not medieval, but a lot older than
                                            >one usually sees. These are massive looms made for weaving coverlets
                                            >and such. Here is the museum website:
                                            ><http://www.hometextiletoolmuseum.org/>http://www.hometextiletoolmuseum.org/
                                            >. There is also a lovely old
                                            >woodshop there that has a treadle lathe you might want to look at.
                                            >
                                            >My impression when I visited the museum was that it was underfunded
                                            >and run by volunteers. If I were you, I would call ahead and try to
                                            >make sure that the day you go there are guides there knowledgeable in
                                            >the areas you are particularly interested in.
                                            >
                                            >Scolastica
                                          • D. Young
                                            Im not usually one for machines but am working on my kitchen renovation so routers do come in handy...and I stumbled across these
                                            Message 21 of 21 , Jan 4, 2011
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                                              Im not usually one for machines but am working on my kitchen renovation so routers do come in handy...and I stumbled across these

                                              http://www.infinitytools.com/17th-Century-Molding-Router-Bits/products/1421/






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