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Dendrochronology lab - image source

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  • Jeff
    Most you probably know about dendrochronology/xylology, so the science part is old hat to you, but this site has some images of furniture that you might
    Message 1 of 2 , Dec 13, 2010
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      Most you probably know about dendrochronology/xylology, so the science part is old hat to you, but this site has some images of furniture that you might appreciate. AND there is material on Traceology - toolmarks. Special bonus: latrine lid photos!

      I reviewed a couple of the reports this organization folks produced a couple of years back during a visit to the Cluny. They contained exceptional images and insight into how the objects go together, including diagrams of how the pieces were derived - essentially a map of where each board came from in the tree and how they were cut. It looks like some of the publications can be ordered. Others seem to be published in various journals, which you may find online, but likely you need someone in a university to obtain.

      http://www.dendro.fr/furniturestudies.html

      A word of advice, if you do want one of their publications: someone mentioned having trouble with museums responding. This may not have been an issue in that case, but when contacting museums, professional historians and technicians. DO NOT get chatty, do not use SCA names, titles, or even mention that affiliation, or any other such you may have. Keep it simple, real, direct and businesslike. Ask if the specific material you want is available, and how you can get it. No more, no less.

      Jeff
    • Lynda Fjellman
      A word of advice, if you do want one of their publications: someone mentioned having trouble with museums responding. This may not have been an issue in that
      Message 2 of 2 , Dec 13, 2010
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        A word of advice, if you do want one of their publications: someone mentioned having trouble with museums responding. This may not have been an issue in that case, but when contacting museums, professional historians and technicians. DO NOT get chatty, do not use SCA names, titles, or even mention that affiliation, or any other such you may have. Keep it simple, real, direct and businesslike. Ask if the specific material you want is available, and how you can get it. No more, no less.



        To enlarge and reiterate.
        Museums will reply to you.  They are VERY busy though. Over worked and underfunded, just like the rest of us.  Act professionally, be responsible, be prepared to pay for some of the services rendered.  Materials aren't free.
        Hubby and I have gotten "back room" privileges at quite a few museums over the years.  BUT you have to be knowledgeable about what you are going to be looking at.  Museums don't have endless staff to take care of endless inquiries.  Be specific about what you need to know.
        Write your query legibly and spell it correctly.  Use your mundane name.  Don't worry about being a member of the SCA, but don't bring it up first thing.  You are a private researcher working on a specific query.  Don't waste time.  Later on *if* things get friendly you can talk about hobbies.
        Ilaria


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