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Lumber Price Survey

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  • Siegfried
    So, having just used a bunch of 1x s4s pine lumber from Home Depot for that last project. And dealing with the non-straightness of it. My mind started to
    Message 1 of 26 , Dec 7, 2010
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      So, having just used a bunch of 1x s4s pine lumber from Home Depot for
      that last project. And dealing with the 'non-straightness' of it.

      My mind started to think: "Ok, next time, even if I'm going cheap, I
      should just buy the 'cheap pine' from a real wood supplier and take the
      effort to plane/joint it myself"

      Thing is ... It seems that there is a huge disparity in lumber prices.
      I admit I'm used to only going to my local wood suppliers for more high
      end wood.

      But I looked at the lower end, and prices are drastically different:

      A 1x12x8 at Home Depot, is around $8 ... so $1 a board foot

      Looking at a couple local suppliers near me, the cheapest wood I can
      find is (All prices 4/4 for reference):

      Ash: 3.50
      Birch: 3.90
      Cherry: 3.95
      Cypress: 3.95
      Fir: 3.95
      Hackberry: 2.95
      Hickory: 3.30
      Hard Maple: 2.99
      Soft Maple: 3.50
      Wormy Maple: 2.25
      Red Oak: 2.42
      White Oak: 3.95
      White Pine: 3.70
      Yellow Pine: 2.95
      Poplar: 2.15
      Knotty Pine: 2.05

      At these prices ... even the cheapest stuff is more than double the cost.

      I'm just curious what kind of prices people are finding near them at the
      moment. Wondering if this price-disparity is the same in other places.

      It 'used' to be, 5-7 years ago, that you could get stuff 'as cheap or
      cheaper' in the lumber supplier, given you had to do the processing
      yourself :) Now, it seems that the box stores have got the market on
      'cheap pine'

      Siegfried



      --
      Barun Siegfried Sebastian Faust - Barony of Highland Foorde - Atlantia
      http://hf.atlantia.sca.org/ - http://crossbows.biz/ - http://eliw.com/
    • Jeffrey Johnson
      Forwarding you my mill s pricelist off the list Jeff
      Message 2 of 26 , Dec 7, 2010
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        Forwarding you my mill's pricelist off the list

        Jeff

        On Dec 7, 2010 9:29 PM, "Siegfried" <siegfried@...> wrote:
        > So, having just used a bunch of 1x s4s pine lumber from Home Depot for
        > that last project. And dealing with the 'non-straightness' of it.
        >
        > My mind started to think: "Ok, next time, even if I'm going cheap, I
        > should just buy the 'cheap pine' from a real wood supplier and take the
        > effort to plane/joint it myself"
        >
        > Thing is ... It seems that there is a huge disparity in lumber prices.
        > I admit I'm used to only going to my local wood suppliers for more high
        > end wood.
        >
        > But I looked at the lower end, and prices are drastically different:
        >
        > A 1x12x8 at Home Depot, is around $8 ... so $1 a board foot
        >
        > Looking at a couple local suppliers near me, the cheapest wood I can
        > find is (All prices 4/4 for reference):
        >
        > Ash: 3.50
        > Birch: 3.90
        > Cherry: 3.95
        > Cypress: 3.95
        > Fir: 3.95
        > Hackberry: 2.95
        > Hickory: 3.30
        > Hard Maple: 2.99
        > Soft Maple: 3.50
        > Wormy Maple: 2.25
        > Red Oak: 2.42
        > White Oak: 3.95
        > White Pine: 3.70
        > Yellow Pine: 2.95
        > Poplar: 2.15
        > Knotty Pine: 2.05
        >
        > At these prices ... even the cheapest stuff is more than double the cost.
        >
        > I'm just curious what kind of prices people are finding near them at the
        > moment. Wondering if this price-disparity is the same in other places.
        >
        > It 'used' to be, 5-7 years ago, that you could get stuff 'as cheap or
        > cheaper' in the lumber supplier, given you had to do the processing
        > yourself :) Now, it seems that the box stores have got the market on
        > 'cheap pine'
        >
        > Siegfried
        >
        >
        >
        > --
        > Barun Siegfried Sebastian Faust - Barony of Highland Foorde - Atlantia
        > http://hf.atlantia.sca.org/ - http://crossbows.biz/ - http://eliw.com/
      • Jeff
        My local mill (local as in across the road) Prices are similar for many Maryland Select Hardwoods, LaPlata, MD 301-753-6120 REGULAR SALE Ambrosia Red
        Message 3 of 26 , Dec 8, 2010
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          My local mill (local as in across the road) Prices are similar for many

          Maryland Select Hardwoods, LaPlata, MD 301-753-6120

          REGULAR SALE
          Ambrosia Red Maple, Curly $5.95 $4.95
          Ambrosia Red Maple, booked matched pairs $3.95 $3.50
          Walnut 4/4 A $5.50 $4.95
          Cherry 4/4 A $4.50 $3.95
          Cherry 4/4 B $3.85 $2.50
          White Pine, clear $3.50 $2.95
          Alder 4/4 $4.50 $3.95
          Red Oak 4/4 B - small tight knots $1.75 $1.40
          Red Maple 4/4 A $2.50 $2.25
          Ambrosia Maple 4/4 A $1.95 $1.75
          Hard Maple 4/4 B $2.45 $1.9

          Dawn Redwood flitches, surfaced 2 1/8 Prices from $140.00 to $225.00 each

          --- In medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com, Siegfried <siegfried@...> wrote:
          >
          > Ash: 3.50
          > Birch: 3.90
          > Cherry: 3.95
          > Cypress: 3.95
          > Fir: 3.95
          > Hackberry: 2.95
          > Hickory: 3.30
          > Hard Maple: 2.99
          > Soft Maple: 3.50
          > Wormy Maple: 2.25
          > Red Oak: 2.42
          > White Oak: 3.95
          > White Pine: 3.70
          > Yellow Pine: 2.95
          > Poplar: 2.15
          > Knotty Pine: 2.05
          >
          > At these prices ... even the cheapest stuff is more than double the cost.
          >
          > I'm just curious what kind of prices people are finding near them at the
          > moment. Wondering if this price-disparity is the same in other places.
          >
          > It 'used' to be, 5-7 years ago, that you could get stuff 'as cheap or
          > cheaper' in the lumber supplier, given you had to do the processing
          > yourself :) Now, it seems that the box stores have got the market on
          > 'cheap pine'
          >
          > Siegfried
          >
          >
          >
          > --
          > Barun Siegfried Sebastian Faust - Barony of Highland Foorde - Atlantia
          > http://hf.atlantia.sca.org/ - http://crossbows.biz/ - http://eliw.com/
          >
        • Colleen Vince
          Bow River Craftwood (Chilliwack, BC, Canada). My favorite localish supplier. The don t sell Pine or other common softwoods. I love the yellow cedar when its
          Message 4 of 26 , Dec 8, 2010
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            Bow River Craftwood (Chilliwack, BC, Canada). My favorite localish supplier.

            The don't sell Pine or other common softwoods. I love the yellow cedar when its instick... oh and the Pear. How I love working with Pear wood.

             

            General Wood

            Bowl Blanks, Turning Squares and Lumber

            SpeciesCAN$/BF 
            AA Figured & Spalted Maple (acer macrophyllum)$8.75 
            AAA Figured & Spalted Maple (acer macrophyllum)$13.75 
            Acacia - locust$8.00 
            Apple - Green $8.50 
            Birch, Spalted AAA$13.50 
            Butternut$10.00 
            Cascara$8.00 
            Cedar, Texas (Juniperus Ash)$8.50 
            Cedar, Yellow - clear tight grian$8.00 
            Cherry, bitter$8.50 
            Cherry, black$12.50 
            Cherry, black Figured$18.00 
            Chestnut, Horse$8.00 
            Chestnut, Horse - Spalted AAA$15.00 
            Chestnut, Sweet$8.00 
            Cocobolo, Honduras$36.00 
            Douglas Fir (old growth)$7.50 
            Elm, grey$8.00 
            Magnolia$7.00 
            Maple, Bigleaf (acer macrophyllum)$5.00 
            Mesquite (Texas)$18.00 
            Mesquite (Texas) contains void$15.00 
            Oak, Garry$8.00 
            Pacific Red Alder$7.50 
            Pear$8.00 
            Quilted Maple (acer macrophyllum)$18.50 
            Sassafrass$8.50 
            Walnut, black (juglans nigra)$11.00 
            Walnut, English$7.50 
            Walnut, Japanese$7.50 
            Yew $12.00 
            Yew, Clear$18.50 
             

            Specialty Lumber

            Burl FurnitureCAN$/BF 
            Natural Edge Burl Table TopsCall 
            Natural Edge Burl Bed HeadboardsCall 
             

            Carving Wood

            SpeciesCAN$/BF 
            Basswood$7.50 
            Yellow Cedar$8.00 
            Yew$12.00 
             

            Micro Lumber

            SpeciesCAN$/BF 
            5/8" AAA Figured Maple$11.00 
            ½" AAA Figured Maple$9.00 
            3/8" AAA Figured Maple$7.00 
            5/8" Burl$13.00 
            1/2" Burl$11.00 
            3/8" Burl$9.00 
            5/8" Yew$12.00 
            1/2" Yew$10.00 
            3/8" Yew$8.00
             
            --
            Mary Ostler    
            Apprentice to Mistress Agnes Cresewyke
            Lions Gate Game Marshal
            www.maryostler.com
          • Jeffrey Johnson
            PS. That was the just the december sale flyer pricelist I posted, but it gives the general order of the pricing. Jeff
            Message 5 of 26 , Dec 8, 2010
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              PS. That was the just the december sale flyer pricelist I posted, but it gives the general order of the pricing.

              Jeff

              On Dec 8, 2010 8:52 AM, "Jeff" <jljonsn@...> wrote:
              > My local mill (local as in across the road) Prices are similar for many
              >
              > Maryland Select Hardwoods, LaPlata, MD 301-753-6120
              >
              > REGULAR SALE
              > Ambrosia Red Maple, Curly $5.95 $4.95
              > Ambrosia Red Maple, booked matched pairs $3.95 $3.50
              > Walnut 4/4 A $5.50 $4.95
              > Cherry 4/4 A $4.50 $3.95
              > Cherry 4/4 B $3.85 $2.50
              > White Pine, clear $3.50 $2.95
              > Alder 4/4 $4.50 $3.95
              > Red Oak 4/4 B - small tight knots $1.75 $1.40
              > Red Maple 4/4 A $2.50 $2.25
              > Ambrosia Maple 4/4 A $1.95 $1.75
              > Hard Maple 4/4 B $2.45 $1.9
              >
              > Dawn Redwood flitches, surfaced 2 1/8 Prices from $140.00 to $225.00 each
              >
              > --- In medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com, Siegfried <siegfried@...> wrote:
              >>
              >> Ash: 3.50
              >> Birch: 3.90
              >> Cherry: 3.95
              >> Cypress: 3.95
              >> Fir: 3.95
              >> Hackberry: 2.95
              >> Hickory: 3.30
              >> Hard Maple: 2.99
              >> Soft Maple: 3.50
              >> Wormy Maple: 2.25
              >> Red Oak: 2.42
              >> White Oak: 3.95
              >> White Pine: 3.70
              >> Yellow Pine: 2.95
              >> Poplar: 2.15
              >> Knotty Pine: 2.05
              >>
              >> At these prices ... even the cheapest stuff is more than double the cost.
              >>
              >> I'm just curious what kind of prices people are finding near them at the
              >> moment. Wondering if this price-disparity is the same in other places.
              >>
              >> It 'used' to be, 5-7 years ago, that you could get stuff 'as cheap or
              >> cheaper' in the lumber supplier, given you had to do the processing
              >> yourself :) Now, it seems that the box stores have got the market on
              >> 'cheap pine'
              >>
              >> Siegfried
              >>
              >>
              >>
              >> --
              >> Barun Siegfried Sebastian Faust - Barony of Highland Foorde - Atlantia
              >> http://hf.atlantia.sca.org/ - http://crossbows.biz/ - http://eliw.com/
              >>
              >
              >
            • Megan Shogren
              I haven t priced out their 1bys or 2bys in plain ol pine, but 84 Lumber is about half Home Depot/Lowe s prices on the same moulding.  They re just a lot
              Message 6 of 26 , Dec 8, 2010
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                I haven't priced out their 1bys or 2bys in plain ol' pine, but 84 Lumber is about half Home Depot/Lowe's prices on the same moulding.  They're just a lot harder for me to get to while they're open.
                 
                I got some 6/4 rough-cut maple from a local guy who does urban forestry for $2.50/board foot.  For the nicer woods (really, anything better than builder's grade pine) that might be something to look at. 
                 
                My hunch is that the contractor-oriented places like 84 Lumber will get far better pricing on builder's-grade pine because of the sheer quantity they order.
                 
                -Kat Ferneley

              • arnold smith
                I just run my mill as a hobby mill but stay in line with the other guys in the area. maple $2.50 birch, ash, poplar $1.00 red oak $2.00 white pine $0.85 spruce
                Message 7 of 26 , Dec 8, 2010
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                  I just run my mill as a hobby mill but stay in line with the other guys in the area.

                  maple $2.50
                  birch, ash, poplar $1.00
                  red oak $2.00
                  white pine $0.85
                  spruce $0.50




                  To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
                  From: jljonsn@...
                  Date: Tue, 7 Dec 2010 23:25:21 -0500
                  Subject: Re: [MedievalSawdust] Lumber Price Survey

                   

                  Forwarding you my mill's pricelist off the list
                  Jeff
                  On Dec 7, 2010 9:29 PM, "Siegfried" <siegfried@...> wrote:
                  > So, having just used a bunch of 1x s4s pine lumber from Home Depot for
                  > that last project. And dealing with the 'non-straightness' of it.
                  >
                  > My mind started to think: "Ok, next time, even if I'm going cheap, I
                  > should just buy the 'cheap pine' from a real wood supplier and take the
                  > effort to plane/joint it myself"
                  >
                  > Thing is ... It seems that there is a huge disparity in lumber prices.
                  > I admit I'm used to only going to my local wood suppliers for more high
                  > end wood.
                  >
                  > But I looked at the lower end, and prices are drastically different:
                  >
                  > A 1x12x8 at Home Depot, is around $8 ... so $1 a board foot
                  >
                  > Looking at a couple local suppliers near me, the cheapest wood I can
                  > find is (All prices 4/4 for reference):
                  >
                  > Ash: 3.50
                  > Birch: 3.90
                  > Cherry: 3.95
                  > Cypress: 3.95
                  > Fir: 3.95
                  > Hackberry: 2.95
                  > Hickory: 3.30
                  > Hard Maple: 2.99
                  > Soft Maple: 3.50
                  > Wormy Maple: 2.25
                  > Red Oak: 2.42
                  > White Oak: 3.95
                  > White Pine: 3.70
                  > Yellow Pine: 2.95
                  > Poplar: 2.15
                  > Knotty Pine: 2.05
                  >
                  > At these prices ... even the cheapest stuff is more than double the cost.
                  >
                  > I'm just curious what kind of prices people are finding near them at the
                  > moment. Wondering if this price-disparity is the same in other places.
                  >
                  > It 'used' to be, 5-7 years ago, that you could get stuff 'as cheap or
                  > cheaper' in the lumber supplier, given you had to do the processing
                  > yourself :) Now, it seems that the box stores have got the market on
                  > 'cheap pine'
                  >
                  > Siegfried
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > --
                  > Barun Siegfried Sebastian Faust - Barony of Highland Foorde - Atlantia
                  > http://hf.atlantia.sca.org/ - http://crossbows.biz/ - http://eliw.com/

                • Jeffrey Johnson
                  Curious as to what area you re in ... the area.
                  Message 8 of 26 , Dec 8, 2010
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                    Curious as to what area you re in

                    On Dec 8, 2010 4:48 PM, "arnold smith" <arnold_smith@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > I just run my mill as a hobby mill but stay in line with the other guys in the area.
                    >
                    > maple $2.50
                    > birch, ash, poplar $1.00
                    > red oak $2.00
                    > white pine $0.85
                    > spruce $0.50
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
                    > From: jljonsn@...
                    > Date: Tue, 7 Dec 2010 23:25:21 -0500
                    > Subject: Re: [MedievalSawdust] Lumber Price Survey
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > Forwarding you my mill's pricelist off the list
                    > Jeff
                    > On Dec 7, 2010 9:29 PM, "Siegfried" <siegfried@...> wrote:
                    >> So, having just used a bunch of 1x s4s pine lumber from Home Depot for
                    >
                    >
                    >> that last project. And dealing with the 'non-straightness' of it.
                    >>
                    >> My mind started to think: "Ok, next time, even if I'm going cheap, I
                    >> should just buy the 'cheap pine' from a real wood supplier and take the
                    >
                    >
                    >> effort to plane/joint it myself"
                    >>
                    >> Thing is ... It seems that there is a huge disparity in lumber prices.
                    >> I admit I'm used to only going to my local wood suppliers for more high
                    >> end wood.
                    >
                    >
                    >>
                    >> But I looked at the lower end, and prices are drastically different:
                    >>
                    >> A 1x12x8 at Home Depot, is around $8 ... so $1 a board foot
                    >>
                    >> Looking at a couple local suppliers near me, the cheapest wood I can
                    >
                    >
                    >> find is (All prices 4/4 for reference):
                    >>
                    >> Ash: 3.50
                    >> Birch: 3.90
                    >> Cherry: 3.95
                    >> Cypress: 3.95
                    >> Fir: 3.95
                    >> Hackberry: 2.95
                    >> Hickory: 3.30
                    >> Hard Maple: 2.99
                    >
                    >
                    >> Soft Maple: 3.50
                    >> Wormy Maple: 2.25
                    >> Red Oak: 2.42
                    >> White Oak: 3.95
                    >> White Pine: 3.70
                    >> Yellow Pine: 2.95
                    >> Poplar: 2.15
                    >> Knotty Pine: 2.05
                    >>
                    >> At these prices ... even the cheapest stuff is more than double the cost.
                    >
                    >
                    >>
                    >> I'm just curious what kind of prices people are finding near them at the
                    >> moment. Wondering if this price-disparity is the same in other places.
                    >>
                    >> It 'used' to be, 5-7 years ago, that you could get stuff 'as cheap or
                    >
                    >
                    >> cheaper' in the lumber supplier, given you had to do the processing
                    >> yourself :) Now, it seems that the box stores have got the market on
                    >> 'cheap pine'
                    >>
                    >> Siegfried
                    >>
                    >
                    >
                    >>
                    >>
                    >> --
                    >> Barun Siegfried Sebastian Faust - Barony of Highland Foorde - Atlantia
                    >> http://hf.atlantia.sca.org/ - http://crossbows.biz/ - http://eliw.com/
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
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                    >
                  • Siegfried
                    Wow, where are you so that we can all decend upon you and buy mass quantities. That s amazingly cheap compared to prices here. Siegfried ... -- Barun
                    Message 9 of 26 , Dec 8, 2010
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                      Wow, where are you so that we can all decend upon you and buy mass
                      quantities. That's amazingly cheap compared to prices here.

                      Siegfried


                      On 12/8/10 4:48 PM, arnold smith wrote:
                      >
                      >
                      > I just run my mill as a hobby mill but stay in line with the other guys
                      > in the area.
                      >
                      > maple $2.50
                      > birch, ash, poplar $1.00
                      > red oak $2.00
                      > white pine $0.85
                      > spruce $0.50
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      > ------------------------------------------------------------------------
                      > To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
                      > From: jljonsn@...
                      > Date: Tue, 7 Dec 2010 23:25:21 -0500
                      > Subject: Re: [MedievalSawdust] Lumber Price Survey
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      > Forwarding you my mill's pricelist off the list
                      > Jeff
                      > On Dec 7, 2010 9:29 PM, "Siegfried" <siegfried@...
                      > <mailto:siegfried@...>> wrote:
                      >> So, having just used a bunch of 1x s4s pine lumber from Home Depot for
                      >> that last project. And dealing with the 'non-straightness' of it.
                      >>
                      >> My mind started to think: "Ok, next time, even if I'm going cheap, I
                      >> should just buy the 'cheap pine' from a real wood supplier and take the
                      >> effort to plane/joint it myself"
                      >>
                      >> Thing is ... It seems that there is a huge disparity in lumber prices.
                      >> I admit I'm used to only going to my local wood suppliers for more high
                      >> end wood.
                      >>
                      >> But I looked at the lower end, and prices are drastically different:
                      >>
                      >> A 1x12x8 at Home Depot, is around $8 ... so $1 a board foot
                      >>
                      >> Looking at a couple local suppliers near me, the cheapest wood I can
                      >> find is (All prices 4/4 for reference):
                      >>
                      >> Ash: 3.50
                      >> Birch: 3.90
                      >> Cherry: 3.95
                      >> Cypress: 3.95
                      >> Fir: 3.95
                      >> Hackberry: 2.95
                      >> Hickory: 3.30
                      >> Hard Maple: 2.99
                      >> Soft Maple: 3.50
                      >> Wormy Maple: 2.25
                      >> Red Oak: 2.42
                      >> White Oak: 3.95
                      >> White Pine: 3.70
                      >> Yellow Pine: 2.95
                      >> Poplar: 2.15
                      >> Knotty Pine: 2.05
                      >>
                      >> At these prices ... even the cheapest stuff is more than double the cost.
                      >>
                      >> I'm just curious what kind of prices people are finding near them at the
                      >> moment. Wondering if this price-disparity is the same in other places.
                      >>
                      >> It 'used' to be, 5-7 years ago, that you could get stuff 'as cheap or
                      >> cheaper' in the lumber supplier, given you had to do the processing
                      >> yourself :) Now, it seems that the box stores have got the market on
                      >> 'cheap pine'
                      >>
                      >> Siegfried
                      >>
                      >>
                      >>
                      >> --
                      >> Barun Siegfried Sebastian Faust - Barony of Highland Foorde - Atlantia
                      >> http://hf.atlantia.sca.org/ - http://crossbows.biz/ - http://eliw.com/
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >

                      --
                      Barun Siegfried Sebastian Faust - Barony of Highland Foorde - Atlantia
                      http://hf.atlantia.sca.org/ - http://crossbows.biz/ - http://eliw.com/
                    • arnold smith
                      Actually located near Thessalon Ontario. Which is sixty miles east of Sault ste. Marie.
                      Message 10 of 26 , Dec 8, 2010
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                        Actually located near Thessalon Ontario. Which is sixty miles east of Sault ste. Marie.

                        > To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
                        > CC: arnold_smith@...
                        > From: siegfried@...
                        > Date: Wed, 8 Dec 2010 21:30:37 -0500
                        > Subject: Re: [MedievalSawdust] Lumber Price Survey
                        >
                        > Wow, where are you so that we can all decend upon you and buy mass
                        > quantities. That's amazingly cheap compared to prices here.
                        >
                        > Siegfried
                        >
                        >
                        > On 12/8/10 4:48 PM, arnold smith wrote:
                        > >
                        > >
                        > > I just run my mill as a hobby mill but stay in line with the other guys
                        > > in the area.
                        > >
                        > > maple $2.50
                        > > birch, ash, poplar $1.00
                        > > red oak $2.00
                        > > white pine $0.85
                        > > spruce $0.50
                        > >
                        > >
                        > >
                        > > ------------------------------------------------------------------------
                        > > To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
                        > > From: jljonsn@...
                        > > Date: Tue, 7 Dec 2010 23:25:21 -0500
                        > > Subject: Re: [MedievalSawdust] Lumber Price Survey
                        > >
                        > >
                        > >
                        > > Forwarding you my mill's pricelist off the list
                        > > Jeff
                        > > On Dec 7, 2010 9:29 PM, "Siegfried" <siegfried@...
                        > > <mailto:siegfried@...>> wrote:
                        > >> So, having just used a bunch of 1x s4s pine lumber from Home Depot for
                        > >> that last project. And dealing with the 'non-straightness' of it.
                        > >>
                        > >> My mind started to think: "Ok, next time, even if I'm going cheap, I
                        > >> should just buy the 'cheap pine' from a real wood supplier and take the
                        > >> effort to plane/joint it myself"
                        > >>
                        > >> Thing is ... It seems that there is a huge disparity in lumber prices.
                        > >> I admit I'm used to only going to my local wood suppliers for more high
                        > >> end wood.
                        > >>
                        > >> But I looked at the lower end, and prices are drastically different:
                        > >>
                        > >> A 1x12x8 at Home Depot, is around $8 ... so $1 a board foot
                        > >>
                        > >> Looking at a couple local suppliers near me, the cheapest wood I can
                        > >> find is (All prices 4/4 for reference):
                        > >>
                        > >> Ash: 3.50
                        > >> Birch: 3.90
                        > >> Cherry: 3.95
                        > >> Cypress: 3.95
                        > >> Fir: 3.95
                        > >> Hackberry: 2.95
                        > >> Hickory: 3.30
                        > >> Hard Maple: 2.99
                        > >> Soft Maple: 3.50
                        > >> Wormy Maple: 2.25
                        > >> Red Oak: 2.42
                        > >> White Oak: 3.95
                        > >> White Pine: 3.70
                        > >> Yellow Pine: 2.95
                        > >> Poplar: 2.15
                        > >> Knotty Pine: 2.05
                        > >>
                        > >> At these prices ... even the cheapest stuff is more than double the cost.
                        > >>
                        > >> I'm just curious what kind of prices people are finding near them at the
                        > >> moment. Wondering if this price-disparity is the same in other places.
                        > >>
                        > >> It 'used' to be, 5-7 years ago, that you could get stuff 'as cheap or
                        > >> cheaper' in the lumber supplier, given you had to do the processing
                        > >> yourself :) Now, it seems that the box stores have got the market on
                        > >> 'cheap pine'
                        > >>
                        > >> Siegfried
                        > >>
                        > >>
                        > >>
                        > >> --
                        > >> Barun Siegfried Sebastian Faust - Barony of Highland Foorde - Atlantia
                        > >> http://hf.atlantia.sca.org/ - http://crossbows.biz/ - http://eliw.com/
                        > >
                        > >
                        > >
                        > >
                        >
                        > --
                        > Barun Siegfried Sebastian Faust - Barony of Highland Foorde - Atlantia
                        > http://hf.atlantia.sca.org/ - http://crossbows.biz/ - http://eliw.com/
                        >
                        >
                        > ------------------------------------
                        >
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                      • Vels inn Viggladi
                        I m thinking over the winter of trying to knock out a traditional plane or two. The upper is likely to be beech, but I am rather at a loss for where to go for
                        Message 11 of 26 , Dec 13, 2010
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                          I'm thinking over the winter of trying to knock out a traditional plane or two. The upper is likely to be beech, but I am rather at a loss for where to go for a sole.
                          I know there are a couple of "kits" available commercially, but I really do not want to use exotic and new world woods in these.
                          Anyone have recommendations for a European hardwood that might work well in this instance? It has to be a wood that is hard, wear resistant, and it would be nice if it had a color that contrasts well with the Beech. Olive and Lignum Vitae crossed my mind, but for the first couple I'm thinking Hard Maple, but thought I'd see what recommendations you all had.



                          Vels
                        • leaking pen
                          vote for the maple.
                          Message 12 of 26 , Dec 13, 2010
                          • 0 Attachment
                            vote for the maple.

                            On Mon, Dec 13, 2010 at 8:41 AM, Vels inn Viggladi <velsthe1@...> wrote:
                             

                            I'm thinking over the winter of trying to knock out a traditional plane or two. The upper is likely to be beech, but I am rather at a loss for where to go for a sole.
                            I know there are a couple of "kits" available commercially, but I really do not want to use exotic and new world woods in these.
                            Anyone have recommendations for a European hardwood that might work well in this instance? It has to be a wood that is hard, wear resistant, and it would be nice if it had a color that contrasts well with the Beech. Olive and Lignum Vitae crossed my mind, but for the first couple I'm thinking Hard Maple, but thought I'd see what recommendations you all had.



                            Vels


                          • conradh@efn.org
                            ... I ve used ash with good results, for the whole stock of a big jointer. I was replicating the one the joiner is using in the Bourdichon painting, ca. 1500.
                            Message 13 of 26 , Dec 13, 2010
                            • 0 Attachment
                              On Mon, December 13, 2010 7:41 am, Vels inn Viggladi wrote:
                              >

                              > I'm thinking over the winter of trying to knock out a traditional plane
                              > or two. The upper is likely to be beech, but I am rather at a loss for
                              > where to go for a sole. I know there are a couple of "kits" available
                              > commercially, but I really do not want to use exotic and new world woods
                              > in these. Anyone have recommendations for a European hardwood that might
                              > work well in this instance? It has to be a wood that is hard, wear
                              > resistant, and it would be nice if it had a color that contrasts well
                              > with the Beech. Olive and Lignum Vitae crossed my mind, but for the first
                              > couple I'm thinking Hard Maple, but thought I'd see what recommendations
                              > you all had.
                              >
                              >
                              I've used ash with good results, for the whole stock of a big jointer. I
                              was replicating the one the joiner is using in the Bourdichon painting,
                              ca. 1500.
                              I use it fairly often, mostly for edge jointing, and it seems to be
                              wearing well.

                              I've heard great things about beech, but have never used it. I traded for
                              several blocks of it at a show, and may try making some smaller planes out
                              of a couple of the pieces.

                              How stable is olive wood? It's hard enough and very pretty. Anyone have
                              info on period planes from Mediterranean countries? What did they use?

                              Ulfhedinn
                            • D. Young
                              I can look up the type of wood used for the planes on the Mary Rose. I think oak....but Ill double check. Fine Armour and Historical Reproductions Custom
                              Message 14 of 26 , Dec 14, 2010
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                                I can look up the type of wood used for the planes on the Mary Rose.  I think oak....but Ill double check.





                                Fine Armour and Historical Reproductions

                                     Custom Commissions Welcome....!

                                www.partsandtechnical.com
                                (Well Formed Munitions Catalog Coming This Spring)
                                 





                                To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
                                From: conradh@...
                                Date: Mon, 13 Dec 2010 12:02:55 -0800
                                Subject: Re: [MedievalSawdust] Plane Woods

                                 
                                On Mon, December 13, 2010 7:41 am, Vels inn Viggladi wrote:
                                >

                                > I'm thinking over the winter of trying to knock out a traditional plane
                                > or two. The upper is likely to be beech, but I am rather at a loss for
                                > where to go for a sole. I know there are a couple of "kits" available
                                > commercially, but I really do not want to use exotic and new world woods
                                > in these. Anyone have recommendations for a European hardwood that might
                                > work well in this instance? It has to be a wood that is hard, wear
                                > resistant, and it would be nice if it had a color that contrasts well
                                > with the Beech. Olive and Lignum Vitae crossed my mind, but for the first
                                > couple I'm thinking Hard Maple, but thought I'd see what recommendations
                                > you all had.
                                >
                                >
                                I've used ash with good results, for the whole stock of a big jointer. I
                                was replicating the one the joiner is using in the Bourdichon painting,
                                ca. 1500.
                                I use it fairly often, mostly for edge jointing, and it seems to be
                                wearing well.

                                I've heard great things about beech, but have never used it. I traded for
                                several blocks of it at a show, and may try making some smaller planes out
                                of a couple of the pieces.

                                How stable is olive wood? It's hard enough and very pretty. Anyone have
                                info on period planes from Mediterranean countries? What did they use?

                                Ulfhedinn


                              • conradh@efn.org
                                ... Don t bother, got the book right here! Of 20 planes found, 8 were oak, 5 were beech, 5 were boxwood. One each of ash, holly, pine and an unspecified
                                Message 15 of 26 , Dec 15, 2010
                                • 0 Attachment
                                  On Tue, December 14, 2010 2:53 pm, D. Young wrote:
                                  >

                                  > I can look up the type of wood used for the planes on the Mary Rose. I
                                  > think oak....but Ill double check.
                                  >

                                  Don't bother, got the book right here!

                                  Of 20 planes found, 8 were oak, 5 were beech, 5 were boxwood.

                                  One each of ash, holly, pine and an unspecified fruitwood (apple & pear
                                  would both be good choices. Compared to the pine, anything would be a
                                  good choice IMHO!)

                                  Scanning the data table, I get the first impression of a size correlation.
                                  The boxwood planes are all small "thumb planes". The largest planes are
                                  beech and ash. The intermediate sizes (smoothers, molding planes, rabbet
                                  planes) are mostly oak.

                                  Ulfhedinn
                                • D. Young
                                  Thanks.... My Before the Mast delay is due to the fact that I handled poison sumac that week and cross contaminated my book, lol So Ive had to be very
                                  Message 16 of 26 , Dec 15, 2010
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                                    Thanks....

                                    My Before the Mast delay  is due to the fact that I handled poison sumac that week and cross contaminated my book, lol

                                    So Ive had to be very judicious when cleaning it and dealing with certain pages.   Madness I tell you, madness.





                                    Fine Armour and Historical Reproductions

                                         Custom Commissions Welcome....!

                                    www.partsandtechnical.com
                                    (Well Formed Munitions Catalog Coming This Spring)
                                     





                                    To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
                                    From: conradh@...
                                    Date: Wed, 15 Dec 2010 13:26:12 -0800
                                    Subject: RE: [MedievalSawdust] Plane Woods

                                     
                                    On Tue, December 14, 2010 2:53 pm, D. Young wrote:
                                    >

                                    > I can look up the type of wood used for the planes on the Mary Rose. I
                                    > think oak....but Ill double check.
                                    >

                                    Don't bother, got the book right here!

                                    Of 20 planes found, 8 were oak, 5 were beech, 5 were boxwood.

                                    One each of ash, holly, pine and an unspecified fruitwood (apple & pear
                                    would both be good choices. Compared to the pine, anything would be a
                                    good choice IMHO!)

                                    Scanning the data table, I get the first impression of a size correlation.
                                    The boxwood planes are all small "thumb planes". The largest planes are
                                    beech and ash. The intermediate sizes (smoothers, molding planes, rabbet
                                    planes) are mostly oak.

                                    Ulfhedinn


                                  • Jeffrey Johnson
                                    Make sense. Can t imagine a box foreplane.
                                    Message 17 of 26 , Dec 15, 2010
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                                      Make sense. Can't imagine a box foreplane.
                                    • conradh@efn.org
                                      ... That was what I thought when I noticed the size correlation. Seems to be something as true then as now. Ulfhedinn
                                      Message 18 of 26 , Dec 16, 2010
                                      • 0 Attachment
                                        On Wed, December 15, 2010 6:37 pm, Jeffrey Johnson wrote:
                                        > Make sense. Can't imagine a box foreplane.
                                        >
                                        >
                                        That was what I thought when I noticed the size correlation. Seems to be
                                        something as true then as now.

                                        Ulfhedinn
                                      • Lynda Fjellman
                                        Well that would depend.  Some old growth pine is REALLY hard and tough.  Not that you can get much of that these days. Slow grown pine is very strong and
                                        Message 19 of 26 , Dec 16, 2010
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                                          Well that would depend.  Some old growth pine is REALLY hard and tough.  Not that you can get much of that these days.
                                          Slow grown pine is very strong and hard.  Slow grown oak is porous and soft/weak.
                                          Fast grown pine is soft and fast grown oak is strong.  Just all depends.

                                          Prune or plum would be even better than apple.  Hard tough stuff, plum wood.
                                          Ilaria


                                          One each of ash, holly, pine and an unspecified fruitwood (apple & pear
                                          would both be good choices. Compared to the pine, anything would be a
                                          good choice IMHO!)

                                          __W

                                        • D. Young
                                          I agree except for the oak part. Depends on what kind of oak. Red oak is not white oak.... :) Fine Armour and Historical Reproductions Custom Commissions
                                          Message 20 of 26 , Dec 16, 2010
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                                            I agree except for the oak part.   Depends on what kind of oak.  Red oak is not white oak....  :)





                                            Fine Armour and Historical Reproductions

                                                 Custom Commissions Welcome....!

                                            www.partsandtechnical.com
                                            (Well Formed Munitions Catalog Coming This Spring)
                                             





                                            To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
                                            From: lyndafjellman@...
                                            Date: Thu, 16 Dec 2010 11:05:51 -0800
                                            Subject: RE: [MedievalSawdust] Plane Woods

                                             
                                            Well that would depend.  Some old growth pine is REALLY hard and tough.  Not that you can get much of that these days.
                                            Slow grown pine is very strong and hard.  Slow grown oak is porous and soft/weak.
                                            Fast grown pine is soft and fast grown oak is strong.  Just all depends.

                                            Prune or plum would be even better than apple.  Hard tough stuff, plum wood.
                                            Ilaria


                                            One each of ash, holly, pine and an unspecified fruitwood (apple & pear
                                            would both be good choices. Compared to the pine, anything would be a
                                            good choice IMHO!)


                                            __W

                                          • D. Young
                                            Yes my grandfathers plans are likely new england pine....very tough stuff. Still usable. btw...folks you can find old antique plans on ebay for dirt cheap....a
                                            Message 21 of 26 , Dec 16, 2010
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                                              Yes my grandfathers plans are likely new england pine....very tough stuff.

                                              Still usable.

                                              btw...folks you can find old antique plans on ebay for dirt cheap....a little TLC and these things will give another century of use.




                                              Fine Armour and Historical Reproductions

                                                   Custom Commissions Welcome....!

                                              www.partsandtechnical.com
                                              (Well Formed Munitions Catalog Coming This Spring)
                                               





                                              To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
                                              From: lyndafjellman@...
                                              Date: Thu, 16 Dec 2010 11:05:51 -0800
                                              Subject: RE: [MedievalSawdust] Plane Woods

                                               
                                              Well that would depend.  Some old growth pine is REALLY hard and tough.  Not that you can get much of that these days.
                                              Slow grown pine is very strong and hard.  Slow grown oak is porous and soft/weak.
                                              Fast grown pine is soft and fast grown oak is strong.  Just all depends.

                                              Prune or plum would be even better than apple.  Hard tough stuff, plum wood.
                                              Ilaria


                                              One each of ash, holly, pine and an unspecified fruitwood (apple & pear
                                              would both be good choices. Compared to the pine, anything would be a
                                              good choice IMHO!)


                                              __W

                                            • Vels inn Viggladi
                                              Yeah, I scored some rather nice vintage and antique from clearing out my father s tools after he died. There s a Stanley jack plane that needs some love, but
                                              Message 22 of 26 , Dec 16, 2010
                                              • 0 Attachment

                                                Yeah, I scored some rather nice vintage and antique from clearing out my father's tools after he died. There's a Stanley jack plane that needs some love, but the No. 248 plow plane is in prime shape. Quite a few others as well that I believe he got from the estate sale of a tool collector.

                                                Nice as they are, I'm really thinking it will be a great challenge and a lot of fun to do a few "really old school" planes. I want to start with a couple bench planes, probably a jointer, then try to tackle a router plane. I'm going for German/Continental styles rather than English.


                                                Vels


                                                To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
                                                From: furnaceplans@...
                                                Date: Thu, 16 Dec 2010 17:29:41 -0500
                                                Subject: RE: [MedievalSawdust] Plane Woods



                                                Yes my grandfathers plans are likely new england pine....very tough stuff.

                                                Still usable.

                                                btw...folks you can find old antique plans on ebay for dirt cheap....a little TLC and these things will give another century of use.




                                              • Peter Ellison
                                                I took the same approach.  Started with a 1960 s Millers Falls from a relative, then decided that I d try my hand at making them myself once I saw how much
                                                Message 23 of 26 , Dec 16, 2010
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                                                  I took the same approach.  Started with a 1960's Millers Falls from a relative, then decided that I'd try my hand at making them myself once I saw how much ones cost to buy.  Seems like a doable project and it is.

                                                  Because when I started I my hand tool skills where pretty weak I used the Pilly method that is mostly power tool based.

                                                  http://www.philsville.co.uk/
                                                  Select the step by step projects and the Jack plane.

                                                  Other than the mouth being too large it is my work horse for thickness planing boards.

                                                  Since then I have made a Jointer, using a slightly different method that I did not like that has no chisel work.  This plane took a lot of work to fix.  Getting a flat sole without a power jointer is difficult.  I resorted to getting a "marble" windowsill that is 36" taking a belt sander belt and clamping it to the sill and then slowly sand it flat.  It does work, but this was not till after I had removed a lot of material from the sole and opened up the mouth, to the point I needed to reto fit it.

                                                  A router, that works ok but not great the bed for the iron is curved so it does not lock in blade in right.  Needs more work with the plane makers float (a really easy tool to make).

                                                  A traditional molding plane that was a failure, this was my first, I'll attempt to fix it some day but not for a while.  Don't start with a molding plane unless it is a 1/2 round.

                                                  A shoulder plane so I could true up some badly sawed mortise and tenons.

                                                  My last project is a smoothing plane, it is just leaving the glue point.

                                                  Except for the router and the molding plane the rest are all from a single beech board.  It needed to be glued up to make a thicker block.  I was amazed that a local lumber store had beech and a number of other less common woods at decent prices.  So if you are near Minneapolis Siwek lumber is very nice.

                                                  As a side note sawing benches make ripping lumber much easier with a hand saw.  If you don't have one I'd suggest making one.  Not a 100% sure if the design I used is period but the "Book of trades" has a German guy in the same posture cutting a board on a stump, so it seems logical to me that they might have made a bench as opposed to lugging around a stump in the shop. One 2x12 by 8 feet makes a nice bench.

                                                  Over the last month my hand tool skills are MUCH better, I'm on the one dove tail joint a day plan.  Origionally I did them with only a miter saw and a chisel till my chiseling got better now I take the short cut and use a coping saw to remove most of the waste. 

                                                  Peter

                                                  >
                                                  >
                                                  > Yeah, I scored some rather nice vintage and antique from clearing out my
                                                  > father's tools after he died. There's a Stanley jack plane that needs some
                                                  > love, but the No. 248 plow plane is in prime shape. Quite a few others as
                                                  > well that I believe he got from the estate sale of a tool collector.
                                                  >

                                                  > Nice as they are, I'm really thinking it will be a great
                                                  challenge and a
                                                  > lot of fun to do a few "really old school" planes. I want to start with a
                                                  > couple bench planes, probably a jointer, then try to tackle a router
                                                  > plane. I'm going for German/Continental styles rather than English.
                                                  >
                                                  >

                                                  > Vels
                                                  >
                                                  > To:
                                                  medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
                                                  >
                                                  From: furnaceplans@...
                                                  > Date: Thu, 16 Dec 2010 17:29:41 -0500
                                                  > Subject: RE: [MedievalSawdust] Plane Woods
                                                  >
                                                  >
                                                  >
                                                  >
                                                  >
                                                  >
                                                  >
                                                  >

                                                  >
                                                  >
                                                  >
                                                  >
                                                  >
                                                  >
                                                  />>
                                                  >
                                                  >
                                                  >
                                                  >
                                                  >
                                                  >

                                                  >
                                                  >
                                                  >
                                                  >
                                                  >
                                                  >
                                                  />>
                                                  > Yes my grandfathers plans are likely new england pine....very tough stuff.
                                                  >
                                                  > Still usable.
                                                  >
                                                  > btw...folks you can find old antique plans on ebay for dirt cheap....a
                                                  > little TLC and these things will give another century of use.
                                                  >
                                                  >
                                                  >
                                                  >
                                                  >
                                                  >
                                                • conradh@efn.org
                                                  ... I know southern yellow pine from the US can be functionally a hardwood--is there any pine from Europe like that? Thanks for the reminder about prune wood.
                                                  Message 24 of 26 , Dec 16, 2010
                                                  • 0 Attachment
                                                    On Thu, December 16, 2010 11:05 am, Lynda Fjellman wrote:
                                                    > Well that would depend.  Some old growth pine is REALLY hard and tough. 
                                                    > Not that you can get much of that these days.
                                                    > Slow grown pine is very strong and hard.  Slow grown oak is porous and
                                                    > soft/weak. Fast grown pine is soft and fast grown oak is strong.  Just all
                                                    > depends.
                                                    >
                                                    > Prune or plum would be even better than apple.  Hard tough stuff, plum
                                                    > wood. Ilaria
                                                    >

                                                    I know southern yellow pine from the US can be functionally a hardwood--is
                                                    there any pine from Europe like that?

                                                    Thanks for the reminder about prune wood. I have a broken Italian Prune
                                                    in my front yard to take out--maybe I'll find some of it worth seasoning!

                                                    Ulfhedinn
                                                  • conradh@efn.org
                                                    ... Enjoy! When I made my big Bourdichon jointer replica, I found I really liked the big horn as a gripping point, especially at the end of a stroke when I
                                                    Message 25 of 26 , Dec 16, 2010
                                                    • 0 Attachment
                                                      On Thu, December 16, 2010 2:42 pm, Vels inn Viggladi wrote:
                                                      >

                                                      >
                                                      > Yeah, I scored some rather nice vintage and antique from clearing out my
                                                      > father's tools after he died. There's a Stanley jack plane that needs
                                                      > some love, but the No. 248 plow plane is in prime shape. Quite a few
                                                      > others as well that I believe he got from the estate sale of a tool
                                                      > collector.
                                                      >
                                                      > Nice as they are, I'm really thinking it will be a great challenge and a
                                                      > lot of fun to do a few "really old school" planes. I want to start with a
                                                      > couple bench planes, probably a jointer, then try to tackle a router
                                                      > plane. I'm going for German/Continental styles rather than English.
                                                      >
                                                      Enjoy! When I made my big Bourdichon jointer replica, I found I really
                                                      liked the big horn as a gripping point, especially at the end of a stroke
                                                      when I lift the plane for the return. Also, a crosspin is a much easier
                                                      way to fit a wedge than those side notches the English use.

                                                      Ulfhedinn
                                                    • Jeff
                                                      There s no reason a heartwood big plane wouldn t work, and there is plenty of pine in germany/N Italy for a local woodworker to use. Jeff
                                                      Message 26 of 26 , Dec 17, 2010
                                                      • 0 Attachment
                                                        There's no reason a heartwood big plane wouldn't work, and there is plenty of pine in germany/N Italy for a local woodworker to use.

                                                        Jeff

                                                        --- In medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com, conradh@... wrote:
                                                        >
                                                        > On Thu, December 16, 2010 2:42 pm, Vels inn Viggladi wrote:
                                                        > >
                                                        >
                                                        > >
                                                        > > Yeah, I scored some rather nice vintage and antique from clearing out my
                                                        > > father's tools after he died. There's a Stanley jack plane that needs
                                                        > > some love, but the No. 248 plow plane is in prime shape. Quite a few
                                                        > > others as well that I believe he got from the estate sale of a tool
                                                        > > collector.
                                                        > >
                                                        > > Nice as they are, I'm really thinking it will be a great challenge and a
                                                        > > lot of fun to do a few "really old school" planes. I want to start with a
                                                        > > couple bench planes, probably a jointer, then try to tackle a router
                                                        > > plane. I'm going for German/Continental styles rather than English.
                                                        > >
                                                        > Enjoy! When I made my big Bourdichon jointer replica, I found I really
                                                        > liked the big horn as a gripping point, especially at the end of a stroke
                                                        > when I lift the plane for the return. Also, a crosspin is a much easier
                                                        > way to fit a wedge than those side notches the English use.
                                                        >
                                                        > Ulfhedinn
                                                        >
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