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Re: [MedievalSawdust] Hello Folks.

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  • Siegfried
    ... Well said. In my case, I go back and forth depending on what I m making. Sometimes I m making a medieval replica crossbow, and so it s lots of hand work
    Message 1 of 30 , Nov 11, 2010
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      > Actually I think you're both right. The group is broad enough to cover
      > all sorts of woodworking, and ought to be.

      Well said. In my case, I go back and forth depending on what I'm making.

      Sometimes I'm making a medieval replica crossbow, and so it's lots of
      hand work (after rough power work) to get it exactly how I want it to look.

      Sometimes I'm making a munition combat crossbow. Where the idea is to
      create something that is period in appearance, but quickly churned out
      for efficiency/cost.

      Right now, a big focus that I have is an attempt for myself, and others,
      to generate lots of quick/inexpensive camp-equipment that can replace
      plastic tables, rubbermaid totes, and coleman chairs.

      Once those are created/replaced in as quick of a timeframe as possible.
      Focus will shift back to making 'awesome truly period works of art'
      versions of same :)

      It's a spectrum I swing back-n-forth on, depending upon the task at
      hand. And I like doing that myself :)

      But I have great respect for the hand-made works of art :)

      Siegfried



      --
      Barun Siegfried Sebastian Faust - Barony of Highland Foorde - Atlantia
      http://hf.atlantia.sca.org/ - http://crossbows.biz/ - http://eliw.com/
    • conradh@efn.org
      ... To say nothing of the much greater strength of handmade dowels, at least if you rive them instead of ripsawing. I was breaking up some old machined dowels
      Message 2 of 30 , Nov 11, 2010
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        On Wed, November 10, 2010 8:13 am, D. Young wrote:
        >


        > And there is a natural fear of using hand tools because people think they
        > are too hard to master. This is not true. After a few hours with a
        > drawknife or hand plane, one gets the idea pretty quickly. Same is true
        > with chisels.
        >
        > And then there are things like machined dowels----worst idea ever!
        > Machine dowels are too perfect, which often results in a looser fit.
        > Hand made dowels take a few minutes to make but produce a tighter fit
        > because they are not as round.
        >
        To say nothing of the much greater strength of handmade dowels, at least
        if you rive them instead of ripsawing. I was breaking up some old
        machined dowels just the other day (for firewood) and was appalled at the
        way they broke. Some of the grain was running 30-40 degrees off the axis
        of the dowel! The shear strength you expect, and need, in a doweled joint
        just isn't going to be there.

        There is a tendency to think that anything modern has to be better, and
        certainly faster, than the old stuff. We need to get beyond the
        self-congratulatory bullshit and realize that occasionally the old ways
        were _faster_ than modern. And materials prepared in the old way were
        routinely better quality. And especially that a hand-tool shop can often
        be set up for less money, simply because it's easier to scrounge or make
        the tools.

        Ulfhedinn
      • jay sabath
        Bill, Thanks for the link. please check out http://www.marhamchurchantiques.com/ They usually have several photos from each item as well as a good description.
        Message 3 of 30 , Nov 12, 2010
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          Bill,

          Thanks for the link. 

          please check out
          http://www.marhamchurchantiques.com/
          They usually have several photos from each item as well as a good description.


          Lord Johannes Machiavelli
          Canton of Rokkehealden
          Barony of Ayreton
          Kingdom of the Middle

          On Wed, Nov 10, 2010 at 10:36 AM, Bill McNutt <mcnutt@...> wrote:
           

          My favorite online antiques site is Huntington Antiques, in the south of England.

          http://www.huntington-antiques.com/products.php?type=1

           

           




          --

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