Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

polyurethane on leather?

Expand Messages
  • Isabelle LaFar
    I have found a 14th century cabinet that I d like to reproduce, scaled down for use in the camp kitchen. The cabinet has doors paneled with tooled leather. I
    Message 1 of 7 , Nov 1, 2010
    • 0 Attachment
      I have found a 14th century cabinet that I'd like to reproduce, scaled down for use in the camp kitchen. The cabinet has doors paneled with tooled leather. 
      I want to use the cabinet to conceal a sink and a propane stove, so I expect to have drips & such that would likely be too much for a wax or oil finish to handle. 

      Has anyone ever tried putting polyurethane on leather? I'm still in the planning & idea-exploring stage.

      --Isabelle
    • Lynda Fjellman
      I haven t actually tried it, but if you are putting the tooled leather over wood on the doors, I don t see why it shouldn t work.  I think that the main
      Message 2 of 7 , Nov 1, 2010
      • 0 Attachment
        I haven't actually tried it, but if you are putting the tooled leather over wood on the doors, I don't see why it shouldn't work.  I think that the main problem would be putting a hard surface(polyurethane) on a flexible material(leather) but the wood underlayment should take care of that.
        It might change the color of the leather if that is of concern.  The solvent based polyurethane tends to yellow things.  The water based one is more clear, but either one might darken the leather and one or the other might absorb into the leather more than you like.
        Of course if you really want to know what will happen try a test sample.  Make a bit of tooled leather like you have in mind, apply it to whatever substrate you intend with whatever glue you plan to use and varnish away.
        Then let us know how it went!
        Ilaria

        --- On Mon, 11/1/10, Isabelle LaFar <isabelle@...> wrote:

        From: Isabelle LaFar <isabelle@...>
        Subject: [MedievalSawdust] polyurethane on leather?
        To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
        Date: Monday, November 1, 2010, 1:04 PM

         

        I have found a 14th century cabinet that I'd like to reproduce, scaled down for use in the camp kitchen. The cabinet has doors paneled with tooled leather. 

        I want to use the cabinet to conceal a sink and a propane stove, so I expect to have drips & such that would likely be too much for a wax or oil finish to handle. 

        Has anyone ever tried putting polyurethane on leather? I'm still in the planning & idea-exploring stage.

        --Isabelle

      • Duncan Sinclair
        Not aware of anyone putting Poly on leather, but try a sample and see how it works. Most leather workers will seal with wax (bee), or, there is a food grade
        Message 3 of 7 , Nov 1, 2010
        • 0 Attachment
          Not aware of anyone putting Poly on leather, but try a sample and see how it works. Most leather workers will seal with wax (bee), or, there is a food grade sealent out there if you search for it.

          --- On Mon, 11/1/10, Isabelle LaFar <isabelle@...> wrote:

          From: Isabelle LaFar <isabelle@...>
          Subject: [MedievalSawdust] polyurethane on leather?
          To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
          Date: Monday, November 1, 2010, 8:04 PM

           
          I have found a 14th century cabinet that I'd like to reproduce, scaled down for use in the camp kitchen. The cabinet has doors paneled with tooled leather. 
          I want to use the cabinet to conceal a sink and a propane stove, so I expect to have drips & such that would likely be too much for a wax or oil finish to handle. 

          Has anyone ever tried putting polyurethane on leather? I'm still in the planning & idea-exploring stage.

          --Isabelle

        • Vels inn Viggladi
          Polyurethane on leather is no problem. Thin coats of it are on just about every modern leather item we purchase. It s what gives the new leather look to
          Message 4 of 7 , Nov 1, 2010
          • 0 Attachment

            Polyurethane on leather is no problem. Thin coats of it are on just about every modern leather item we purchase. It's what gives the "new leather look" to shoes and sofas.

            Going a different tack -- you could also try sizing the leather, and the whole of the cabinet, with hide glue. Skim milk will make it waterproof, ground aspirin will fight mold.
            With hot hide glue: Replace the water in the normal mix with skim milk, add a few finely ground aspirin to the pot, then apply in two or more thin coats to all parts you figure might get wet. If you can get it, use a willow stick to mix you glue pot, that'd save on having to grind up the aspirin.
            With liquid hide glue: mix 50/50 with warmed skim milk, mix in finely ground aspirin. Or- mix powdered skim milk with water (per whatever directions for your volume) and add ground aspirin. Once that's good and fluid, mix about 50/50 with liquid hide glue, apply as before.

            If you do want to go with hot hide glue, I'd recommend rabbit, as it's the least hygroscopic of the lot. You may want to run a freshly cut clove of garlic over the leather, depending on what kind of tanning was used, to remove any oils. Regardless, figure about 24 hours for everything to cure.

            BTW- hello to the list, this is my first post and I'm rather new here. My name is Vels, and I have a hide glue problem.




            Vels


            To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
            From: isabelle@...
            Date: Mon, 1 Nov 2010 16:04:27 -0400
            Subject: [MedievalSawdust] polyurethane on leather?



            I have found a 14th century cabinet that I'd like to reproduce, scaled down for use in the camp kitchen. The cabinet has doors paneled with tooled leather. 
            I want to use the cabinet to conceal a sink and a propane stove, so I expect to have drips & such that would likely be too much for a wax or oil finish to handle. 

            Has anyone ever tried putting polyurethane on leather? I'm still in the planning & idea-exploring stage.

            --Isabelle


          • Bill McNutt
            I think that, even over a hard surface, a poly coat on leather will crack and flake. From: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
            Message 5 of 7 , Nov 2, 2010
            • 0 Attachment

              I think that, even over a hard surface, a poly coat on leather will crack and flake. 

               

              From: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com [mailto:medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Lynda Fjellman
              Sent: Monday, November 01, 2010 5:00 PM
              To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
              Subject: Re: [MedievalSawdust] polyurethane on leather?

               

               

              I haven't actually tried it, but if you are putting the tooled leather over wood on the doors, I don't see why it shouldn't work.  I think that the main problem would be putting a hard surface(polyurethane) on a flexible material(leather) but the wood underlayment should take care of that.
              It might change the color of the leather if that is of concern.  The solvent based polyurethane tends to yellow things.  The water based one is more clear, but either one might darken the leather and one or the other might absorb into the leather more than you like.
              Of course if you really want to know what will happen try a test sample.  Make a bit of tooled leather like you have in mind, apply it to whatever substrate you intend with whatever glue you plan to use and varnish away.
              Then let us know how it went!
              Ilaria

              --- On Mon, 11/1/10, Isabelle LaFar <isabelle@...> wrote:


              From: Isabelle LaFar <isabelle@...>
              Subject: [MedievalSawdust] polyurethane on leather?
              To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
              Date: Monday, November 1, 2010, 1:04 PM

               

              I have found a 14th century cabinet that I'd like to reproduce, scaled down for use in the camp kitchen. The cabinet has doors paneled with tooled leather. 

              I want to use the cabinet to conceal a sink and a propane stove, so I expect to have drips & such that would likely be too much for a wax or oil finish to handle. 

               

              Has anyone ever tried putting polyurethane on leather? I'm still in the planning & idea-exploring stage.

               

              --Isabelle

               

            • Vels inn Viggladi
              Bell Forest Products has English Brown Oak in their Close Out bin currently. The listing is for Select and Better 4 + widths, 6-8ft lengths, no thickness
              Message 6 of 7 , Mar 5, 2013
              • 0 Attachment
                Bell Forest Products has English Brown Oak in their "Close Out" bin currently.
                The listing is for 'Select and Better' 4"+ widths, 6-8ft lengths, no thickness listed. $6.50/bf, minimum order 50 bf.
                For those of us in the US this is a pretty sweet deal. It's rather difficult source English Oak, Stateside. The other great benefit here is Bell Forest freight ships to your door.
                http://www.bellforestproducts.com/hand-pick/view/14049/?b=

                I'm in no position to take advantage of this, but I figured some folks on this list might be interested and may be able to figure the logistics. Perhaps some knot of folks here might be able to arrange a collection to order a lot or two. I think it's a bit of a treat to be able to work in an actual European species of oak.


                Vels
                PS - I have no affiliation with Bell Forest Products, I haven't even ordered from them before, but they do come highly recommended.
              • gavinkilkenny
                Vels, very interesting information, thanks for sharing. My experience with hide glue on leather is that it is forever water soluble - but I never tried making
                Message 7 of 7 , Mar 8, 2013
                • 0 Attachment
                  Vels, very interesting information, thanks for sharing.

                  My experience with hide glue on leather is that it is forever water soluble - but I never tried making it with milk.

                  For the OP - finishes that work on wood will also work on leather (I really like the color that special walnut wood stain produces on veg tan cow.), with certain predictable caveats. If the finish is rigid, it's a poor choice for a piece that's going to flex. If the piece isn't going to be flexing, then a rigid finish is not a problem.

                  A number of the leather specific finishes run afoul of the same issues, Neatlac being a classic example - it makes a fine finish for a framed piece of leather art, but don't use it on a handbag ;)

                  Experienced leather workers have some more specific preferences in terms of exactly which polyurethane wood finishes make the best choices for leather - but as with Everything in the leatherworking world, opinions vary ;)

                  In short form - Go ahead and test your choice of finish on your choice of leather and see whether you like the result. Same as you would test a finish on a scrap of the wood you're working with to see if you like how it turns out ;)


                  --- In medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com, Vels inn Viggladi <velsthe1@...> wrote:
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > Polyurethane on leather is no problem. Thin coats of it are on just about every modern leather item we purchase. It's what gives the "new leather look" to shoes and sofas.
                  >
                  > Going a different tack -- you could also try sizing the leather, and the whole of the cabinet, with hide glue. Skim milk will make it waterproof, ground aspirin will fight mold.
                  > With hot hide glue: Replace the water in the normal mix with skim milk, add a few finely ground aspirin to the pot, then apply in two or more thin coats to all parts you figure might get wet. If you can get it, use a willow stick to mix you glue pot, that'd save on having to grind up the aspirin.
                  > With liquid hide glue: mix 50/50 with warmed skim milk, mix in finely ground aspirin. Or- mix powdered skim milk with water (per whatever directions for your volume) and add ground aspirin. Once that's good and fluid, mix about 50/50 with liquid hide glue, apply as before.
                  >
                  > If you do want to go with hot hide glue, I'd recommend rabbit, as it's the least hygroscopic of the lot. You may want to run a freshly cut clove of garlic over the leather, depending on what kind of tanning was used, to remove any oils. Regardless, figure about 24 hours for everything to cure.
                  >
                  > BTW- hello to the list, this is my first post and I'm rather new here. My name is Vels, and I have a hide glue problem.
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > Vels
                  >
                  > To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
                  > From: isabelle@...
                  > Date: Mon, 1 Nov 2010 16:04:27 -0400
                  > Subject: [MedievalSawdust] polyurethane on leather?
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > I have found a 14th century cabinet that I'd like to reproduce, scaled down for use in the camp kitchen. The cabinet has doors paneled with tooled leather. I want to use the cabinet to conceal a sink and a propane stove, so I expect to have drips & such that would likely be too much for a wax or oil finish to handle.
                  >
                  > Has anyone ever tried putting polyurethane on leather? I'm still in the planning & idea-exploring stage.
                  > --Isabelle
                  >
                Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.