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Re: Medieval Finishes Redux

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  • erik_mage
    The point was to find a finish cleaner than waax or linseed oil that was still period. I have done many gun stocks with a product called Linspeed it basicaly
    Message 1 of 18 , Oct 13, 2010
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      The point was to find a finish cleaner than waax or linseed oil that was still period.
      I have done many gun stocks with a product called Linspeed it basicaly gives a fast drying finnish like boiled linseed oil.
      I suspect it is just that with some japan drier in it.
      ERIK ' mage
      --- In medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com, John LaTorre <jlatorre@...> wrote:
      >
      > Regarding this issue of varnishes and such, it might be worth pointing
      > out what "spar varnish" really means, and why urethane varnishes are
      > well suited for it. Spar varnish must not only be tough and UV
      > resistant, but it must flex as the spar flexes without developing
      > cracks. Urethane varnishes do this particularly well, although you have
      > the usual hassles of stripping off the original finish when refinishing
      > your work. But unless your work actually flexes, like a spar or a tent
      > pole or whatever, spar varnish isn't really better than any other
      > varnish for outdoor use.
      >
      > We do have varnish recipes of a sort from Italian musical instrument
      > makers (although not Stradivari, I'm sorry to say). Again, the finish
      > wouldn't be optimum for furniture or chests, but this time for exactly
      > the opposite reason. Musical instrument varnish is designed to be as
      > hard as possible, to stiffen the tonewood and increase resonance. It
      > isn't really designed for wear, and certainly not for moisture
      > inhibition (in fact, many stringed instruments don't have the interiors
      > of their soundboxes finished). So I guess we're still looking for the
      > recipe for a finish that does what we expect our everyday furniture or
      > tool finishes to do.
      >
      > As for "Tried and True" finishes, I've tried them and haven't had much
      > luck with them. It may have been a quality control thing, but I found
      > that one of the cans I opened had already oxidized to some extent. Has
      > anybody else used this stuff?
      >
      > One last comment about tool finishes. I've used "Tru-Oil" which is yet
      > another varnish/oil hybrid like Watco or Tried&True. The difference is
      > that it's formulated mainly for gunstocks, so it expects to get a lot of
      > hard handling and abuse. It's also a favored finish for guitar necks,
      > which get a similar amount of skin contact. Available from your local
      > gun shop.
      >
      > --Johann von Drachenfels
      > West Kingdom
      >
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