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Re: New, and with ignorance aplenty

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  • frode_kettilsson
    Ulfhedinn, Thanks and wow! I m still digesting all of that, and probably will be for a while! The brake sounds interesting, I m still visualizing it, but I
    Message 1 of 31 , Oct 7, 2010
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      Ulfhedinn,
      Thanks and wow! I'm still digesting all of that, and probably will be for a while! The brake sounds interesting, I'm still visualizing it, but I think I see the basic principle. I like the notion of the bench and leather or rope, it seems both simple and flexible to use with irregular pieces. And, my plane and scraper are among my favorite tools, so it's good to know they're period, too.
      I'll be reading till my eyes bug, I can see.
      Thanks,
      Frode

      --- In medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com, conradh@... wrote:

      >
      > Actually, bow drills and spring-pole lathes _do_ have "power cords", and
      > on the spring-pole lathe it is entirely possible to screw up and cut
      > through them, a thousand years and more before electricity ever ran a hand tool!
      >
      > ...Files for sure, rasps quite likely. Also drawknives, and block planes. Also remember, in Scandinavia right down to the present day, a strong tradition of all sorts of carving knives, some of which can be used in joinery as well as decorative work.
      >
      > ...Crosscut saws...

      > ...Ripsaws, maybe not yet; long lines down the grain would mostly be
      > roughly split and then hewn, drawknifed and planed...

      > ..and, if shave horses aren't
      > > available yet, what alternatives would likely have been used.
      > What they call "brakes", which are notches or pairs of timbers that the work can be sprung into...
      >
      > ... A primitive possible shave horse
      > ancestor is a simple bench, straddled by the worker like a shave >horse. A leather strap or rope has a stirrup-style loop at each >end, and goes over the work. The work is pinned down to the bench >in front of the worker by his feet in the loops. Add a raised >platform for the work in front of the operator, which is easy and >obviously useful, and only the foot lever has to be added to invent >the shave horse...
      >
    • Royce
      And if you want to go the investigative route in the shop, you can always pick up a device called Kill-a-watt. It s a device you plug into the wall outlet and
      Message 31 of 31 , Oct 15, 2010
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        And if you want to go the investigative route in the shop, you can always pick up a device called Kill-a-watt.  It’s a device you plug into the wall outlet and then plug your electronic device into it and it will tell you what it’s drawing.  More or less.  I see them at radio shack personally.   $100 bucks is a lot agreed.

         

        Bercilak

         

        From: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com [mailto:medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Siegfried
        Sent: Friday, October 15, 2010 7:15 AM
        To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: Re: [MedievalSawdust] cost of shop electricity

         

         

        Not to throw in a 'me too'. But ... yeah, I can't see how a little shop
        work could add $100 to an electric bill. My computers eat up more
        power than an hour+ in the shop does. And that's with 220V tablesaw,
        220v dust collector, and who knows what else running semi-constantly.

        Siegfried

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