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painting wood

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  • Ceara ni Neill
    I know that faux finishing (as a woodgrain pattern) dates back at least to the 1700 s. Does anyone have any references of it before 1600? --Ceara
    Message 1 of 4 , Aug 12, 2010
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      I know that faux finishing (as a woodgrain pattern) dates back at least to the 1700's. Does anyone have any references of it before 1600?
      --Ceara
    • erik_mage
      I believe you can use Verselle as an example. I do many of the old world finishes and have an old book that describes How to do ancient wood graining.
      Message 2 of 4 , Aug 15, 2010
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        I believe you can use Verselle as an example.
        I do many of the old world finishes and have an old book that describes How to do ancient wood graining. published in the 1950's.

        Okay here it is the 'Salle de spectacle' was addorned with marblized wood or gilded wood.
        Since wood graining is the easier of the two to do it is only logical to assuem the artist that practiced Marblizing was also an expert at wood graining . Both of which are Faux (french) finish.

        Thanks to Louis and Marrie we have lots of cool things. Like the carousel 1600's

        ERIK mage

        --- In medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com, Ceara ni Neill <ceara@...> wrote:
        >
        > I know that faux finishing (as a woodgrain pattern) dates back at least to
        > the 1700's. Does anyone have any references of it before 1600?
        > --Ceara
        >
      • Ceara ni Neill
        thanks!
        Message 3 of 4 , Aug 15, 2010
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          thanks!

          On Sun, Aug 15, 2010 at 9:10 PM, erik_mage <dragonwyck@...> wrote:
           

          I believe you can use Verselle as an example.
          I do many of the old world finishes and have an old book that describes How to do ancient wood graining. published in the 1950's.

          Okay here it is the 'Salle de spectacle' was addorned with marblized wood or gilded wood.
          Since wood graining is the easier of the two to do it is only logical to assuem the artist that practiced Marblizing was also an expert at wood graining . Both of which are Faux (french) finish.

          Thanks to Louis and Marrie we have lots of cool things. Like the carousel 1600's

          ERIK mage



          --- In medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com, Ceara ni Neill <ceara@...> wrote:
          >
          > I know that faux finishing (as a woodgrain pattern) dates back at least to
          > the 1700's. Does anyone have any references of it before 1600?
          > --Ceara
          >


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