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info on valuing tools?

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  • Conal O'hAirt Jim Hart
    I ve got a halfway descent monthly antique show near me that I saw a fair amount of tools at during my first visit. I d like to pick up a few but I do not want
    Message 1 of 6 , Aug 7, 2010
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      I've got a halfway descent monthly antique show near me that I saw 
      a fair amount of tools at during my first visit.


      I'd like to pick up a few but I do not want to insult by offering too little 
      and I do not want to get taken by an unscrupulous dealer...


      Anyone have a good suggestion for a general reference book to give me
      a feel of what the market supports in value?

      And I know the potential range of what I could find in both dealers and tools
      is SO wide this is not an easy question.



      I also do not want to take advantage of some one who does not know the 
      value of what they have through my own ignorance. That would not sit well
      with me if I found out that I did that....
       
      Baron Conal O'hAirt / Jim Hart

      Aude Aliquid Dignum
      ' Dare Something Worthy '


    • Jeffrey Johnson
      On Aug 7, 2010 11:28 PM, Conal O'hAirt Jim Hart wrote: I ve got a halfway descent monthly antique show near me that I saw a fair
      Message 2 of 6 , Aug 8, 2010
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        On Aug 7, 2010 11:28 PM, "Conal O&apos;hAirt Jim Hart" <baronconal@...> wrote:

         

        I've got a halfway descent monthly antique show near me that I saw 
        a fair amount of tools at during my first visit.


        I'd like to pick up a few but I do not want to insult by offering too little 
        and I do not want to get taken by an unscrupulous dealer...


        Anyone have a good suggestion for a general reference book to give me
        a feel of what the market supports in value?

        And I know the potential range of what I could find in both dealers and tools
        is SO wide this is not an easy question.



        I also do not want to take advantage of some one who does not know the 
        value of what they have through my own ignorance. That would not sit well
        with me if I found out that I did that....
         
        Baron Conal O'hAirt / Jim Hart

        Aude Aliquid Dignum
        ' Dare Something Worthy '


      • erik_mage
        Hi, The value of anything is only that which someone is willing to pay for it nothing more and nothing less. With that said. You likely are looking for tools
        Message 3 of 6 , Aug 8, 2010
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          Hi, The value of anything is only that which someone is willing to pay for it nothing more and nothing less.
          With that said. You likely are looking for tools to be used. Having been in many antique sales (at least 2 per year) I keep and eye out for chisles and gouges. If you are looking for planes there is no shortage.
          Genneral rules to note:(my observations)
          Planes easy.. you are going to be gouged! Planes are highly collectable. That is good old fashion american or german ones. Be sure they have all of thier parts! anywhere from $20 -$100.
          If you're just looking for an old stanley $20- $30 These are hard to sell . If the handle is made from wood less than that. Dealers would never let a rare tool through thier hands with out looking it up.

          Chisles; Always look for the lodest broken dark patina on chisles. Shorter shanks are ok you might never use it up anyway. Once again 'dealers" look up every piece . Times are hard these items are hard to sell. Think $10 per inch of width but be sure you are buying only the highest grade of steel! either pre 1960's USA ,German or Swiss. New chisles in this grade cost about $100 each. Look ing disorganized boxes of tools ( These have been set up just for you) Likely you will find a bunch of modern chisles like buck or craftsman some chinese. Only going for around $2 each. Chinese $1.

          Gouges and burins; Fairly cheep ones will be about $16 each on the retail market. You can look hard for old wallnut handles or no handles at all. The handle side should be cone shaped on gouges.OLD STEEL is the only thing you want here. I have made a simple rule look for bits and pieces pay $1 for small ones (1/4") $2 medium(1/2") No more than $5. If a dealer has some realy nice gouges it is not uncommon to pay $20-$50 for them. These are charished items! Be sure they are stamped by the manufacturer!These are the $100 ones I'm talking about.

          Clamps you can never have enough clamps.
          $1.00 clamps 2"
          $2.00 3-4" with a good solid tip on the screw (not pressed steel)
          for wood work chinese is okay but they are cheep and mar the
          wood so only $1.00 for them
          $3.00 - $5.00 For any large clamp 6 - 10" These sell for about $13-30 brand new.

          Pipe clamps with pipe I would say $5-$10 is a good price not great but more than fair.

          These are my opinions so I hope they help. My advice is to buy one quality chisle from a noted dealer. Then scoure the 'garage sale section'
          Good luck happy hunting ERIK the mage.
          --- In medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com, Jeffrey Johnson <jljonsn@...> wrote:
          >
          > On Aug 7, 2010 11:28 PM, "Conal O'hAirt Jim Hart" <baronconal@...>
          > wrote:
          >
          >
          >
          > I've got a halfway descent monthly antique show near me that I saw
          > a fair amount of tools at during my first visit.
          >
          >
          > I'd like to pick up a few but I do not want to insult by offering too
          > little
          > and I do not want to get taken by an unscrupulous dealer...
          >
          >
          > Anyone have a good suggestion for a general reference book to give me
          > a feel of what the market supports in value?
          >
          > And I know the potential range of what I could find in both dealers and
          > tools
          > is SO wide this is not an easy question.
          >
          >
          >
          > I also do not want to take advantage of some one who does not know the
          > value of what they have through my own ignorance. That would not sit well
          > with me if I found out that I did that....
          >
          > Baron Conal O'hAirt / Jim Hart
          >
          > Aude Aliquid Dignum
          > ' Dare Something Worthy '
          >
        • conradh@efn.org
          ... Milord Baron: the market as represented by antique shows is the last place one should look for tools! Prices are greatly inflated there, by collectors
          Message 4 of 6 , Aug 11, 2010
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            On Sat, August 7, 2010 8:27 pm, Conal O'hAirt Jim Hart wrote:
            > I've got a halfway descent monthly antique show near me that I saw
            > a fair amount of tools at during my first visit.
            >
            >
            > I'd like to pick up a few but I do not want to insult by offering too
            > little and I do not want to get taken by an unscrupulous dealer...
            >
            >
            > Anyone have a good suggestion for a general reference book to give me
            > a feel of what the market supports in value?
            >
            Milord Baron: the "market" as represented by antique shows is the last
            place one should look for tools! Prices are greatly inflated there, by
            collectors and by a tradition of "no bargains for outsiders".

            Prices for insiders vary according to a whole bunch of trivial details, of
            interest only to collectors. An insider can occasionally get a reasonable
            deal on what collectors call a "user"--meaning a tool that's only good for
            shop use. Even those prices run high by my standards.

            There's not really a "market" for used tools in the usual sense of the
            word, except for the hugely inflated antique market, where there are
            indeed reference books, websites and grading standards. However, these
            grading standards are not based on quality of the steel or performance,
            but on rarity and cosmetics. From the point of view of someone who just
            wants a good tool for good work, you definitely will _not_ get what you
            pay for.

            Bargains come from people who are cleaning out their basement, or getting
            rid of the stuff Grandpa couldn't take with him. People who don't know
            "market" prices and often don't even know what the tool is for.
            Occasionally, a dealer will be in this situation, if they don't know tools
            and only handle a few of them. Restorers, of furniture, stoves and so on,
            often find they have to buy a pallet of odds and ends at an estate auction
            to get the chair or woodstove they actually want, and these people
            sometimes have an interesting shelf or table of used tools at fair prices.
            (I got my wonderful Champion forge blower for thirty bucks that way, from
            a stove restorer who didn't even know what it was. She just knew she was
            tired of stubbing her toe on the base of it.)

            A "fair" price is hard to define under these conditions. Blacksmiths are
            a special case--around here at least, smiths seem to have a tradition of
            tool prices not antique prices, and something of a fair standard market
            can be found at tailgate sales during blacksmithing events. For instance,
            a blower like mine goes for 100-150 dollars, good anvils for 2-3 dollars
            per pound, leg vises for 1-2 dollars a pound, and so on.

            I don't know of any equivalent for woodworking tools, though I try to
            apply the same principles when I happen to have some to sell. Personally
            I very rarely buy tools new or at antique stores. Sooner than pay those
            prices, I'll often make them up from scratch. You'd be surprised how
            often this is doable, and how good the tools can turn out to be.

            Ulfhedinn
          • Ralph
            ... I assume you are asking about getting tools to use (as opposed to display), in which case Ulfhedinn is 100% smack on. I would recommend you find, contact
            Message 5 of 6 , Aug 12, 2010
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              --- In medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com, Conal O'hAirt Jim Hart <baronconal@...> wrote:
              >
              > I've got a halfway descent monthly antique show near me that I saw
              > a fair amount of tools at during my first visit.
              >

              I assume you are asking about getting tools to use (as opposed to display), in which case Ulfhedinn is 100% smack on.

              I would recommend you find, contact and join your regional/local "Tool Collectors" http://www.oldtools.com/clubs.html

              They are used to people that want to use old tools (as opposed to just display them)

              Ralg
              AnTir
            • erik_mage
              Ulfhedinn is correct. But there are some oportunities. You should first look up a new product price of the highest calliber. Lets say chisles. Be specific in
              Message 6 of 6 , Aug 15, 2010
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                Ulfhedinn is correct.
                But there are some oportunities.
                You should first look up a new product price of the highest calliber. Lets say chisles. Be specific in your search online or in a store.
                Beware of the cheep stuff and recognize it!
                The highest quality may cost $100.00
                A Good quality may cost $60
                a servicable one may cost $25-30
                a cheep one is $7.00 ( this one is only good for scraping cement since it will never hold an edge)

                How you have done some home work. Even though Collectors pay way too mutch for most antique tools. It is hard to find contemporary equivellents in construction materials. Like using virgin steel.
                look up that and see what happens to the price of your new tool. All of the sudden a long in the blade chisle selling at $20 is not too bad a deal. Especialy since it's eqiv. would cost over $60.

                I have no idea what you are realy looking for, but what ever it is you are not likely to find a deal on the table with each tool carefully laied out. Lightly oiled to a nice sheen. Maybe velvet That would be so nice.
                You would be better off looking for a box of rusty stuff to dig in.

                If you don't have to ask "Hey HOW Much for this old thing?" Then you are probibly getting ripped off! LOL

                A rule an old antique dealer told me. If you are going to do business with some one over and over. Pay what they ask for the first thing you buy. On the second make a low but reasonable offer. This way they know you are spending money and not just playing with them.

                Last note; Tools are like collecting coins
                If you know anything about the value of silver you will notice that a quarter made of silver is worth about $2.50 (est) and the very next year not made from solid silver is worth $0.50
                In this very generic case the metal collector will pay far more than the coin collector on the first coin, and far less on the second coin.

                You and the tool collector are at odds as a tool user. But there are times the user prevails.
                GOOD LUCK
                ERIK'Mage
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