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Re: [MedievalSawdust] Corner Posts on Beds

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  • Tim Bray
    The Gokstadt bed top-knots really dress up the posts. Not terribly difficult to make, though cleaning up saw marks can be tedious on those inside angles. A
    Message 1 of 14 , Jun 2, 2010
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      The Gokstadt bed top-knots really dress up the posts.  Not terribly difficult to make, though cleaning up  saw marks can be tedious on those inside angles.

      A simpler top-knot is found on a lot of medieval furniture and can easily be cut by hand.  Start with a square one, if that's too plain cut it to octagon. 

      To really dress up a later-period bedpost, carve it.  If you have a router you can get a pretty nice effect relatively easily by relieving a Gothic arch into each face of the post.  Then rounding over (or chamfering, which is easier) all the edges (hand-chisel work).   From there is isn't too much of a leap to add tracery... easier than you might think.  I use a handheld min-router to waste away all the background, saving a lot of tedious chopping, before finishing with chisels. 

      Cheers,
      Tim
      realizing I never put up the detail pix on the WK throne page...

      On Sat, May 29, 2010 at 9:01 PM, Jeremy Putt <piero_verrochi@...> wrote:
      My question: If you don't own a lathe and only have basic tools (table saw, circular saw, hand pull saw, drills & sanders) what way would you dress up your posts and not look so square?

    • michael_recchione
      You can make a scratch-stock from a piece of scrap wood, and make the irons from an old hacksaw blade. You need to cut in the profile you want, and then
      Message 2 of 14 , Jun 3, 2010
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        You can make a scratch-stock from a piece of scrap wood, and make the irons from an old hacksaw blade. You need to cut in the profile you want, and then sharpen it like a scraper - ideally, yes, you'd turn a lip on the edge.

        You can buy the equivalent tool ready made from Lee Valley (I have one, they're ok, but not any better than what you can make). Or you can buy the Cadillac version from Lie-Nielsen, modeled on the old Stanley 66. Here's a link, with a video of how these are used:

        http://www.craftsmanstudio.com/html_p/A370.htm

        You can also round the corners of the post with a concave spokeshave, then finish up the rounded corners with a chair devil (which is like the concave spokeshave, but instead of a cutting iron, it's a scraper with a concave profile, used to smooth up what the shave leaves.) These are really easy to make, too.

        Before I had a lathe, I used to do all my shaping with these things and a few molding planes (I had a completely non-electric shop, and still do everything except turning without power...) I still use the hand tools for more complex shapes. It's really not hard, is much more satisfying (to me) - and you can listen to music while you work... :-)

        If you really want to get fancy, buy a few hollow planes to round the corners - you don't need a whole set of hollows and rounds unless you seriously want to get into sticking moldings by hand.

        If you're going to round the corners, do the parallel grooves first, while you still have a corner to guide the tool... (DAMHIKT)

        - Mike

        --- In medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com, Broom <IAmBroom@...> wrote:
        >
        > "leaking pen" itsatrap@... the_leaking_pen
        >
        > > into it, sized for your posts, and dressed like a cabinet scraper. make from
        > > 22 gauge steel with tin snips and files. you then draw it back and forth,
        > > slowly scraping in the shape.
        >
        > Could you go into more detail here? Are you basically hand-scraping
        > the work of a shaper or router? Do you turn a lip on the edge of the
        > scraper? (Doesn't sound like it)
        >
        > I too have bed posts that I want to fancy up. They're frickin' pine,
        > so no carving for me. I was thinking of just some parallel grooves...
        > But ideally, some pattern I could document to late 14th-early 15th.
        >
        > More, please?
        >
        > ' | Broom IAmBroom @ gmail . com
        > ' | cellphone: 412-389-1997
        > ' | 9370 Shadduck Rd, McKean, PA 16426
        > '\|/ "Discere et docere", which means:
        > '/|\ "I like my women like I like my coffee: Irish and full of
        > //|\\ liquor." - via apeiron242, Fark
        >
      • Broom
        Michael, thanks for that description of shaped scrapers. What decoration patterns are appropriate to a 14th-c English bed? You suggest parallel grooves &
        Message 3 of 14 , Jun 4, 2010
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          Michael, thanks for that description of shaped scrapers.

          What decoration patterns are appropriate to a 14th-c English bed? You
          suggest parallel grooves & rounded edges; I think I've found that in
          my searches.

          Square grooves (faux-chiseled) or rounded (gouged)? I'll be using a router.

          TIA for any direction, or pointers to pictures, you can offer.

          ' | Broom IAmBroom @ gmail . com
          ' | cellphone: 412-389-1997
          ' | 9370 Shadduck Rd, McKean, PA 16426
          ' | "Discere et docere", which means:
          '\|/ "Pardon him, Theodotus. He is a barbarian, and thinks that the
          '/|\ customs of his tribe and island are the laws of nature."
          //|\\ - George Bernard Shaw, "Caesar and Cleopatra"
        • Conal O'hAirt Jim Hart
          Broom, do you have any of Roy Underhill s books? Even being years out of the medieval period they are useful Woodworking methods didn t really change much
          Message 4 of 14 , Jun 4, 2010
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            Broom, do you have any of Roy Underhill's books?
            Even being years out of the medieval period they are useful

            Woodworking methods didn't really change much until the
            invention of power tools. A Roman era block plane functions
            pretty much the same way as a modern block plane. Drill bits
            have evolved, but a brace and bit still uses the same techniques
            now that it did 100 or 1000 years ago.

            The decorative elements evolved but the methods used to get those
            forms were pretty constant until electricity ( and/or the spinning cutting 
            tools of the industrial revolution.... for mass production ) were introduced 

            He talks about making some tools in his books that can be used to reproduce
            medieval design elements.
             
            Baron Conal O'hAirt / Jim Hart

            Aude Aliquid Dignum
            ' Dare Something Worthy '



            From: Broom <IAmBroom@...>
            Cc: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
            Sent: Fri, June 4, 2010 11:51:37 AM
            Subject: [MedievalSawdust] Re: Corner Posts on Beds

             

            Michael, thanks for that description of shaped scrapers.

            What decoration patterns are appropriate to a 14th-c English bed? You
            suggest parallel grooves & rounded edges; I think I've found that in
            my searches.

            Square grooves (faux-chiseled) or rounded (gouged)? I'll be using a router.

            TIA for any direction, or pointers to pictures, you can offer.

            ' | Broom IAmBroom @ gmail . com
            ' | cellphone: 412-389-1997
            ' | 9370 Shadduck Rd, McKean, PA 16426
            ' | "Discere et docere", which means:
            '\|/ "Pardon him, Theodotus. He is a barbarian, and thinks that the
            '/|\ customs of his tribe and island are the laws of nature."
            //|\\ - George Bernard Shaw, "Caesar and Cleopatra"


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