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Re: [MedievalSawdust] Re: Bog chair authenticity?

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  • Barekr Silfri
    that definitely could be constructed for take down. I would probably make some notched tennons for the brace running from the back to the front legs, almost
    Message 1 of 25 , Jun 1, 2010
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      that definitely could be constructed for take down. I would probably make some notched tennons for the brace running from the back to the front legs, almost like a half lap joint for the front. The seat would have some mortises to recieve the front leg and a tenon to slide into the back rest.

      for some idea of the notched tenons check out how the stretcher and brace are constructed on the Oseberg loom. I made one and even documented the steps on my blog:

      http://bearw00d.blogspot.com/

      hope this helps, going back to lurking now.

      Bear

      On Tue, Jun 1, 2010 at 10:41 AM, warbow67 <warbow67@...> wrote:
       

      What about this chair?:

      http://i47.tinypic.com/dey5w0.jpg

      Could it be broken down for travel like a bog chair?

      Dave

      ***************************

      --- In medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com, Trevor Payne <littleaiden@...> wrote:
      >
      > One with the same aspects as the stargazer? No.  For all its non historical faults. The stargazer is really amazing in its simplicity of design.  There really is no other chair I have found that can be made as easily as the stargazer.
      >
      > Now that being said, there are a number of other historical chairs that are as comfortable if not more comfortable than a stargazer:
      >
      > glastonbury chair
      > Savoranola chair
      > Viking box chair
      > German Fauld Stool
      >
      > To name a few.  Also, I found this website with a ton of illustrations of period stools and chairs:
      >
      > http://www.gutenberg.org/files/12254/12254-h/12254-h.htm
      >
      > Aiden
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > "Those who beat their swords into plowshares plow for those who didn't"
      >
      > --Benjamin Franklin--
      >
      > --- On Thu, 5/27/10, warbow67 <warbow67@...> wrote:
      >
      > From: warbow67 <warbow67@...>
      > Subject: [MedievalSawdust] Re: Bog chair authenticity?
      > To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
      > Date: Thursday, May 27, 2010, 8:26 AM
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >  
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > Well is there a historical design that is comfortable and gives back support?
      >
      >
      >
      > Dave
      >


    • Siegfried
      This intrigues me. Specifically because: I ve been looking towards making a whole bunch of camp furniture for my wife/I/Barony ... not aiming to be true
      Message 2 of 25 , Jun 1, 2010
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        This intrigues me. Specifically because:

        I've been looking towards making a whole bunch of 'camp furniture' for
        my wife/I/Barony ... not aiming to be true medieval recreations ... but
        to be simple to 'churn out' and for anyone to setup.

        To that end, one of the designs I've seen that someone else made, and I
        loved, was a 'mock trestle table'.

        Basically a 2'x6' (or 8' if you want) sheet of 3/4" ply. With 1x2
        edging glued on to hide the edge and give an appearance of depth.

        Underneath you have legs(1) that are hinged to fold flat underneath the
        table. And then, to keep from having 'little pieces that get lost',
        instead of having tusk tenons ... You have a 2x4 stretcher w/ notches as
        you have described.

        Simply unfold the legs, and stick the stretcher in place. Very simple
        to make. Very simple & fast to setup. Only one 'removable' piece, and
        it's a long 2x4 so not 'losable' :)

        So, if you've actually documented the idea of notched tennons for
        takedown things in period. That's cool. (Not that this is a period
        design I'm talking about, but it's cool to be able to say: "And the
        notched tennon design here is similar to one used on the Oseberg loom")

        Siegfried

        (1) I've seen these tables made with various leg styles. more 3/4" ply
        cut into an 'X'-ish shape. A single 2x6 going down to a wide foot. Or
        a proper X of 2x4 half-lapped and 2 hinges.


        On 6/1/10 11:21 AM, Barekr Silfri wrote:
        >
        >
        > that definitely could be constructed for take down. I would probably
        > make some notched tennons for the brace running from the back to the
        > front legs, almost like a half lap joint for the front. The seat would
        > have some mortises to recieve the front leg and a tenon to slide into
        > the back rest.
        >
        > for some idea of the notched tenons check out how the stretcher and
        > brace are constructed on the Oseberg loom. I made one and even
        > documented the steps on my blog:
        >
        > http://bearw00d.blogspot.com/
        >
        > hope this helps, going back to lurking now.
        >
        > Bear

        --
        Barun Siegfried Sebastian Faust - Barony of Highland Foorde - Atlantia
        http://hf.atlantia.sca.org/ - http://crossbows.biz/ - http://eliw.com/
      • AqA WyrdWynd
        ive seen it before and was hopen to see it either in plan form or broken down pete have at ye with a flock of flaming yodeling hamsters !!! ...
        Message 3 of 25 , Jun 1, 2010
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          ive seen it before and was hopen to see it either in plan form or broken down< exploded view>

          pete

          have at ye with a flock of flaming yodeling hamsters !!!



          --- On Tue, 6/1/10, warbow67 <warbow67@...> wrote:

          From: warbow67 <warbow67@...>
          Subject: [MedievalSawdust] Re: Bog chair authenticity?
          To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
          Date: Tuesday, June 1, 2010, 10:41 AM

          What about this chair?:

          http://i47.tinypic.com/dey5w0.jpg

          Could it be broken down for travel like a bog chair?

          Dave


          ***************************




          --- In medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com, Trevor Payne <littleaiden@...> wrote:
          >
          > One with the same aspects as the stargazer? No.  For all its non historical faults. The stargazer is really amazing in its simplicity of design.  There really is no other chair I have found that can be made as easily as the stargazer.
          >
          > Now that being said, there are a number of other historical chairs that are as comfortable if not more comfortable than a stargazer:
          >
          > glastonbury chair
          > Savoranola chair
          > Viking box chair
          > German Fauld Stool
          >
          > To name a few.  Also, I found this website with a ton of illustrations of period stools and chairs:
          >
          > http://www.gutenberg.org/files/12254/12254-h/12254-h.htm
          >
          > Aiden
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > "Those who beat their swords into plowshares plow for those who didn't"
          >
          > --Benjamin Franklin--
          >
          > --- On Thu, 5/27/10, warbow67 <warbow67@...> wrote:
          >
          > From: warbow67 <warbow67@...>
          > Subject: [MedievalSawdust] Re: Bog chair authenticity?
          > To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
          > Date: Thursday, May 27, 2010, 8:26 AM
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >  
          >
          >
          >
          >   
          >
          >
          >     
          >       
          >       
          >       Well is there a historical design that is comfortable and gives back support?
          >
          >
          >
          > Dave
          >




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        • David
          Nice chair. Where s it from? I just uploaded a plan for a modification of it to break down and assemble easily to the files section, Simple Plank Chair .
          Message 4 of 25 , Jun 1, 2010
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            Nice chair. Where's it from? I just uploaded a plan for a modification of it to break down and assemble easily to the files section, "Simple Plank Chair". Might make one this weekend.
            Tristan deWarrell

            --- In medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com, "warbow67" <warbow67@...> wrote:
            >
            > What about this chair?:
            >
            > http://i47.tinypic.com/dey5w0.jpg
            >
            > Could it be broken down for travel like a bog chair?
            >
            > Dave
            >
            >
            >
          • Barekr Silfri
            one thing about this construction is the mobility of it once assembled is hampered by the fron leg dropping off when you pick up the rest of the chair. I will
            Message 5 of 25 , Jun 1, 2010
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              one thing about this construction is the mobility of it once assembled is hampered by the fron leg dropping off when you pick up the rest of the chair. I will think on it and see if I can figure a fix on that. BTW Pete nice plan. and an interesting side note here: anyone else using Google Sketchup? it is free to use and is pretty powerful stuff for designing 3D objects. There are tutorials and podcasts on using the program online as well. It would be cool for all us woodworkers to be able to spread our designs over the net.

              Bear

              On Tue, Jun 1, 2010 at 7:32 PM, David <dthelmers@...> wrote:
               

              Nice chair. Where's it from? I just uploaded a plan for a modification of it to break down and assemble easily to the files section, "Simple Plank Chair". Might make one this weekend.
              Tristan deWarrell



              --- In medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com, "warbow67" <warbow67@...> wrote:
              >
              > What about this chair?:
              >
              > http://i47.tinypic.com/dey5w0.jpg
              >
              > Could it be broken down for travel like a bog chair?
              >
              > Dave
              >
              >
              >


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