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Re: [medievalsawdust] Tool lists, revisited!

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  • Tim Bray
    ... You re right, that does work well. Especially if you use Roy s trick: make a vertical cut for the shoulder, then an angled cut to take out a wedge of
    Message 1 of 52 , Dec 24, 2003
      Charley Three-Fingers wrote:

      >... an interesting thing about marking knives... they lay in a nice
      >'groove' for starting modern saws in (thin kerf)... bet that would be
      >handy with those Japanese saws...

      You're right, that does work well. Especially if you use Roy's trick: make
      a vertical cut for the shoulder, then an angled cut to take out a wedge of
      material on the cut side; now your saw blade will ride in that groove and
      leave a nice vertical edge on the shoulder. Still takes practice to keep
      the saw from "jumping" out of the groove, but once you get a feel for it,
      you can make really precise cuts.

      >Oh... fingers are back to about 90%.

      That's good to hear!

      >The only remaining problem is that the tendon on the back of the 'social
      >finger' is pretty tight so making a fist isn't totally doable...

      I had that problem after a crushing blow to my right hand many Pennsics
      ago... drove the lame of my gauntlet through the glove and cut the back of
      my index finger right over the first joint. The cut healed fine, but the
      tendon shrank. Took me about two years to get it stretched back out again,
      and it still tightens up a little sometimes.

      Cheers,
      Colin


      Albion Works
      Furniture and Accessories
      For the Medievalist!
      http://www.albionworks.net
      http://www.albionworks.com
    • Don Bowen
      ... Welding cast iron is difficult at best. You have to preheat the part then use a high nickle cast iron welding rod. You weld in stitches or short sections
      Message 52 of 52 , Jan 3, 2004
        Since it was welded once before (I bought it used) and it broke on the weld, I'm hesitant to try it again.  The local Porter-Cable dealer is going to see what he can find.  The part is pretty standard, so even if he doesn't have an exact match, I should be able to buy something for a modern machine.  Last resort, as you suggested, is to hit a machine
        shop and see what can be fabricated.

        Welding cast iron is difficult at best.  You have to preheat the part then use a high nickle cast iron welding rod.  You weld in stitches or short sections then place the object back in the heater.  Some even hammer the weld to help stress relieve the part.  Cool down has to be slow.  You can braze without preheating if you again stitch the weld to keep stresses from building.

        Even the best welding is not good.  I have a 1913 ENGICO Hit-N-Miss engine that we carefully welded and the welds still cracked.  I have an old vise that one jaw was welded on.  I have abused that vise for many years and it is still together.



        Awl Knotted Up  - Custom woodworking
        Don Bowen                      donb@...
        Valley Center, CA             http://www.braingarage.com
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