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shoulder yoke

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  • Conal O'hAirt Jim Hart
    If you were gonna make a shoulder yoke for carrying loads what new world wood would you choose? why that choice? Baron Conal O hAirt / Jim Hart Aude Aliquid
    Message 1 of 9 , May 3 5:56 PM
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      If you were gonna make a shoulder yoke for carrying
      loads what new world wood would you choose?

      why that choice?


       
      Baron Conal O'hAirt / Jim Hart

      Aude Aliquid Dignum
      ' Dare Something Worthy '


    • Conal O'hAirt Jim Hart
      anyone have a link to plans so I can maybe get an idea before I start.... I just want to get some rough ideas about sizes and dimensions. Baron Conal O hAirt /
      Message 2 of 9 , May 3 6:01 PM
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        anyone have a link to plans so I can maybe get an idea
        before I start.... I just want to get some rough ideas 
        about sizes and dimensions. 
         
        Baron Conal O'hAirt / Jim Hart

        Aude Aliquid Dignum
        ' Dare Something Worthy '



        From: Conal O'hAirt Jim Hart <baronconal@...>
        To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Mon, May 3, 2010 8:56:50 PM
        Subject: [MedievalSawdust] shoulder yoke

         

        If you were gonna make a shoulder yoke for carrying
        loads what new world wood would you choose?

        why that choice?


         
        Baron Conal O'hAirt / Jim Hart

        Aude Aliquid Dignum
        ' Dare Something Worthy '



      • Sean Powell
        Shoulder yoke like for carrying 2 buckets? I m fairly certain Roy Underhill did one of these as a project. The reason I recall it is he was remarking about the
        Message 3 of 9 , May 3 7:10 PM
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          Shoulder yoke like for carrying 2 buckets? I'm fairly certain Roy Underhill did one of these as a project. The reason I recall it is he was remarking about the shell wood of a tree being stronger then the core because of the rate at which it grows and the density of the growth rings. He specifically started his from a split 1/4 log so that the tighter gran would be at the bottom and thus remain for the arms extending to either side.

          My memory is known to be inaccurate at times thought. It might be worth checking out.

          I'm going to go out on a limb and say that the lighter the wood is the happier you will be carying it. Also there is a lot of carving, not cutting so the wood needs to carve well. My gut instinct would be for linden wood but tulip poplar is cheap and readily available near me and I'll be damned if a farmer is going to be picky about a chunk of wood for his shoulders. It's a yoke for water buckets, not a long-bow.

          Sean

          On 5/3/2010 9:01 PM, Conal O'hAirt Jim Hart wrote:
          anyone have a link to plans so I can maybe get an idea
          before I start.... I just want to get some rough ideas 
          about sizes and dimensions. 
           
          Baron Conal O'hAirt / Jim Hart

          Aude Aliquid Dignum
          ' Dare Something Worthy '



          From: Conal O'hAirt Jim Hart <baronconal@...>
          To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: Mon, May 3, 2010 8:56:50 PM
          Subject: [MedievalSawdust] shoulder yoke

           
          If you were gonna make a shoulder yoke for carrying
          loads what new world wood would you choose?

          why that choice?


           
          Baron Conal O'hAirt / Jim Hart

          Aude Aliquid Dignum
          ' Dare Something Worthy '



        • Jeffrey Johnson
          Ash. Strong and light On May 3, 2010 7:10 PM, Sean Powell wrote: Shoulder yoke like for carrying 2 buckets? I m fairly certain Roy
          Message 4 of 9 , May 3 9:32 PM
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            Ash. Strong and light

            On May 3, 2010 7:10 PM, "Sean Powell" <powell.sean@...> wrote:

             

            Shoulder yoke like for carrying 2 buckets? I'm fairly certain Roy Underhill did one of these as a project. The reason I recall it is he was remarking about the shell wood of a tree being stronger then the core because of the rate at which it grows and the density of the growth rings. He specifically started his from a split 1/4 log so that the tighter gran would be at the bottom and thus remain for the arms extending to either side.

            My memory is known to be inaccurate at times thought. It might be worth checking out.

            I'm going to go out on a limb and say that the lighter the wood is the happier you will be carying it. Also there is a lot of carving, not cutting so the wood needs to carve well. My gut instinct would be for linden wood but tulip poplar is cheap and readily available near me and I'll be damned if a farmer is going to be picky about a chunk of wood for his shoulders. It's a yoke for water buckets, not a long-bow.

            Sean



            On 5/3/2010 9:01 PM, Conal O'hAirt Jim Hart wrote:
            >
            > anyone have a link to plans so I can maybe ...

          • tessa_rat
            Something low density. i.e. pine or poplar. You are going to want large dimensions to distribute the load over more area. A low density wood will still be
            Message 5 of 9 , May 4 8:54 AM
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              Something low density. i.e. pine or poplar.

              You are going to want large dimensions to distribute the load over more area. A low density wood will still be plenty strong but will weight less.

              Ash is a wonderful wood (I use it on all my tent poles), but is still pretty high density (european ash is even denser than white oak) Also, oak and ash were valuable commercial woods for furniture, weapon shafts, bows, etc. Why use an expensive wood where a cheaper wood will actually work better?

              Both poplar and pine were used in period, but I haven't done much research into the character of european species, so I'm just guessing that the commonly available U.S. lumber will be an appropriate substitute. Anyone have any insight into that?

              My two pfennigs worth,

              Fritz Wilhelm
              welldressedtent.com

              --- In medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com, Conal O'hAirt Jim Hart <baronconal@...> wrote:
              >
              > If you were gonna make a shoulder yoke for carrying
              > loads what new world wood would you choose?
              >
              > why that choice?
              >
              >
              > Baron Conal O'hAirt / Jim Hart
              >
              > Aude Aliquid Dignum
              > ' Dare Something Worthy '
              >
            • leaking pen
              I would want the tight grain on top, since thats where it needs to hold and not split under weight, and the wide grain at the bottom, where there will be a
              Message 6 of 9 , May 4 9:49 AM
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                I would want the tight grain on top, since thats where it needs to hold and not split under weight, and the wide grain at the bottom, where there will be a greater bend.

                Also, not too light, as its got to be strong and stretchy. My gut would be pine, particularly ponderosa, as its less sappy and stronger.  (plus, ive im hauling loads, id love to smell the vanilla as i do so. )  if you want a hard hardwood, cherry would work.

                On Mon, May 3, 2010 at 7:10 PM, Sean Powell <powell.sean@...> wrote:
                 

                Shoulder yoke like for carrying 2 buckets? I'm fairly certain Roy Underhill did one of these as a project. The reason I recall it is he was remarking about the shell wood of a tree being stronger then the core because of the rate at which it grows and the density of the growth rings. He specifically started his from a split 1/4 log so that the tighter gran would be at the bottom and thus remain for the arms extending to either side.

                My memory is known to be inaccurate at times thought. It might be worth checking out.

                I'm going to go out on a limb and say that the lighter the wood is the happier you will be carying it. Also there is a lot of carving, not cutting so the wood needs to carve well. My gut instinct would be for linden wood but tulip poplar is cheap and readily available near me and I'll be damned if a farmer is going to be picky about a chunk of wood for his shoulders. It's a yoke for water buckets, not a long-bow.

                Sean



                On 5/3/2010 9:01 PM, Conal O'hAirt Jim Hart wrote:
                anyone have a link to plans so I can maybe get an idea
                before I start.... I just want to get some rough ideas 
                about sizes and dimensions. 
                 
                Baron Conal O'hAirt / Jim Hart

                Aude Aliquid Dignum
                ' Dare Something Worthy '



                From: Conal O'hAirt Jim Hart <baronconal@...>
                To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
                Sent: Mon, May 3, 2010 8:56:50 PM
                Subject: [MedievalSawdust] shoulder yoke

                 
                If you were gonna make a shoulder yoke for carrying
                loads what new world wood would you choose?

                why that choice?


                 
                Baron Conal O'hAirt / Jim Hart

                Aude Aliquid Dignum
                ' Dare Something Worthy '




              • conradh@efn.org
                ... Drew Langsner, in his first book _Country Woodcraft_ says the wood should be easy to carve, fairly lightweight, yet quite strong. He recommends thoroughly
                Message 7 of 9 , May 4 10:09 AM
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                  On Mon, May 3, 2010 5:56 pm, Conal O'hAirt Jim Hart wrote:
                  > If you were gonna make a shoulder yoke for carrying
                  > loads what new world wood would you choose?
                  >
                  > why that choice?
                  >

                  Drew Langsner, in his first book _Country Woodcraft_ says the wood should
                  be easy to carve, fairly lightweight, yet quite strong. He recommends
                  thoroughly seasoned to avoid checking. He suggests tulip poplar, bass and
                  pine. Chapter 17, pp. 176-9 of that book is about making a yoke. There's
                  a new edition out, ISTR with a title change, and of course chapter and
                  page numbers might be different.

                  I've not made one, though I'd like to sometime. A northern wood I might
                  add to his Southern list would be clear spruce if you can find some. So
                  strong and light that it was the favored wood for airplane props and spars
                  back when those were made of wood--and still valued by builders of
                  traditional wooden boats for booms and yards. The sort of twist carved
                  into a wooden propeller suggests to me that the shoulder-hollow of a yoke
                  shouldn't cause too much weakening if spruce were used.

                  FWIW.
                  Ulfhedinn
                • Conal O'hAirt Jim Hart
                  I m considering working with green wood and doing most of the shaping while the wood is wet and then after it dries finishing it up... It seems to me the
                  Message 8 of 9 , May 4 11:10 AM
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                    I'm considering working with green wood and
                    doing most of the shaping while the wood is
                    'wet' and then after it dries finishing it up...

                    It seems to me the kind of project to do for
                    a first experience in working green wood...
                    It does not have to be pretty for it to work.
                     
                    Baron Conal O'hAirt / Jim Hart

                    Aude Aliquid Dignum
                    ' Dare Something Worthy '



                    From: "conradh@..." <conradh@...>
                    To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
                    Sent: Tue, May 4, 2010 1:09:06 PM
                    Subject: Re: [MedievalSawdust] shoulder yoke

                     

                    On Mon, May 3, 2010 5:56 pm, Conal O'hAirt Jim Hart wrote:
                    > If you were gonna make a shoulder yoke for carrying
                    > loads what new world wood would you choose?
                    >
                    > why that choice?
                    >

                    Drew Langsner, in his first book _Country Woodcraft_ says the wood should
                    be easy to carve, fairly lightweight, yet quite strong. He recommends
                    thoroughly seasoned to avoid checking. He suggests tulip poplar, bass and
                    pine. Chapter 17, pp. 176-9 of that book is about making a yoke. There's
                    a new edition out, ISTR with a title change, and of course chapter and
                    page numbers might be different.

                    I've not made one, though I'd like to sometime. A northern wood I might
                    add to his Southern list would be clear spruce if you can find some. So
                    strong and light that it was the favored wood for airplane props and spars
                    back when those were made of wood--and still valued by builders of
                    traditional wooden boats for booms and yards. The sort of twist carved
                    into a wooden propeller suggests to me that the shoulder-hollow of a yoke
                    shouldn't cause too much weakening if spruce were used.

                    FWIW.
                    Ulfhedinn


                  • Wm G
                    China tree. Strong, hard, and VERY light. Grow it yourself. RileyG
                    Message 9 of 9 , May 4 3:05 PM
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                      China tree. Strong, hard, and VERY light. Grow it yourself.
                      RileyG
                      On Mon, 2010-05-03 at 17:56 -0700, Conal O'hAirt Jim Hart wrote:
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      > If you were gonna make a shoulder yoke for carrying
                      > loads what new world wood would you choose?
                      >
                      >
                      > why that choice?
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      > Baron Conal O'hAirt / Jim Hart
                      >
                      > Aude Aliquid Dignum
                      > ' Dare Something Worthy '
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
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