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Re: [MedievalSawdust] Draw Knife

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  • Electric Wolf
    ... Hello all, My draw knife arrived and I wanted to share. :) -- David Volk Mc. Nullum beneficium inpune stat.
    Message 1 of 6 , Apr 10, 2010
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    On Sat, Apr 3, 2010 at 2:59 PM, <conradh@...> wrote:
    > On Sat, April 3, 2010 8:40 am, Electric Wolf wrote:
    >> Looks like I'll be waiting on mine to ship. Any pointers, tips, dire
    >> warnings any of you can provide?
    >>
    > Secure your workpiece well, because when you're learning it's easy to dig
    > the edge in a bit deep and then the work gets pulled hard.  Traditionally,
    > a lot of drawknife work was held in a shaving horse, but you can use a
    > conventional vise if it's on a bench that won't get pulled over!  Or just
    > clamp the work to a benchtop, countertop, post, or anything else solid.
    > All these work; the advantage of the shaving horse is the very quick
    > release and re-clamp when you need to shift or turn the work.
    >
    > It's also possible to hold work between centers for carving.  Just like it
    > was on a lathe, except here you stuff a wedge or sandbag under the piece
    > so it _won't_ turn until you want it to.  In fact, you can use a lathe as
    > a workholder this way--usually you'll want to stand at the tailstock end.
    > This can work well for shorter tool handles.
    >
    > Scott Landis's _The Workbench Book_ is a marvelous resource for more
    > workholding ideas than you ever imagined, not just benches.  A lot of
    > libraries have it, but after you see it you'll probably want your own.
    >
    > Taunton Press,  ISBN 0-918804-76-0
    >
    > Practice on scrap wood to get the hang of the tool.  The angle of your
    > wrists is what determines whether it will cut, and subtle changes in that
    > angle determine how deep a slice you take.  You can use the thing bevel up
    > or bevel down, but I find bevel down seems to give beginners the best
    > control.
    >
    > One other thing.  A drawknife _in use_ is one of the safest woodworking
    > tools because your hands are safely on the handles and your arms make it
    > almost impossible to cut any other body part.  But they're a total menace
    > in a toolbox.  Unless you hang them on the wall all the time, make a
    > sheath for the blade!  Leather is good, but even taped cardboard is a lot
    > better than nothing.  In a box with other tools that blade will nick them
    > up, get nicked itself, and cut your fingers to the bone while you're
    > reaching for something else in a hurry.  Some drawknives were made with
    > handles that folded over the blade for just this reason; if yours doesn't
    > fold then take a few minutes and rig up a sheath.
    >
    > Ulfhedinn
    >
    >

    Hello all,

    My draw knife arrived and I wanted to share. :)

    --
    David "Volk" Mc.
    Nullum beneficium inpune stat.
  • conradh@efn.org
    ... Interesting--not used to ones where the handles aren t at right angles to the blade. It _seems_ as if it wouldn t offer much edge control (or rather offer
    Message 2 of 6 , Apr 11, 2010
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      On Sat, April 10, 2010 9:09 am, Electric Wolf wrote:

      >
      > My draw knife arrived and I wanted to share. :)
      >
      >
      Interesting--not used to ones where the handles aren't at right angles to
      the blade. It _seems_ as if it wouldn't offer much edge control (or
      rather offer it in a "higher gear". Less leverage, more change of edge
      angle with the smallest wrist adjustment.

      OTOH, those handles might be more ergonomic, for a harder/less strenuous
      pull.

      Please let us know what you think, once you've gotten used to using them!

      Ulfhedinn
    • Electric Wolf
      ... The difference might be the whole Eastern/Western style thing. I m kind of trying to learn what I can from others, use Japanese tools and eventually make
      Message 3 of 6 , Apr 11, 2010
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      On Sun, Apr 11, 2010 at 2:32 AM, <conradh@...> wrote:
      > On Sat, April 10, 2010 9:09 am, Electric Wolf wrote:
      >
      >>
      >> My draw knife arrived and I wanted to share.  :)
      >>
      >>
      > Interesting--not used to ones where the handles aren't at right angles to
      > the blade.  It _seems_ as if it wouldn't offer much edge control (or
      > rather offer it in a "higher gear".  Less leverage, more change of edge
      > angle with the smallest wrist adjustment.
      >
      > OTOH, those handles might be more ergonomic, for a harder/less strenuous
      > pull.
      >
      > Please let us know what you think, once you've gotten used to using them!
      >
      > Ulfhedinn
      >

      The difference might be the whole Eastern/Western style thing. I'm
      kind of trying to learn what I can from others, use Japanese tools and
      eventually make the transition to Japanese techniques and projects.

      I have learned that it does seem to have places where it slides right
      through the wood and others where it stops like I ran into a harder
      section. The very end is tempting to put my thumbs on the pole to
      help pull through the wood if that gives you any idea of how it is
      going.

      --
      David "Wolf" Mc.
      Nullum beneficium inpune stat.
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