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Re: [MedievalSawdust] Re: New.. Intro~ Hi..Want to Make A 2-Wheel Cart For a Portable Oven

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  • conradh@efn.org
    ... Brusi--thakka ydr fyrir! I ve never had the good fortune to see the actual wagon; it wasn t included in the only good Norse museum tour to come within my
    Message 1 of 10 , Mar 2 1:50 PM
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      On Tue, March 2, 2010 6:36 am, Bruce S. R. Lee wrote:
      > As reconstructed, the Oseberg cart does NOT steer, there are a number
      > of pegs that stop any articulation of the front axle or framework.
      >
      > That said, it certainly looks like there was a steerable 4 wheeled
      > cart somewhere in its ancestry, just like a 'Glastonbury' chair looks like
      > there was some sort of folding chair or stool somewhere back in its
      > ancestry, despite which all the existant examples of any antiquity do NOT
      > fold.
      >
      > The interesting part is WHY the Oseberg cart does not have a
      > steerable front axle. Was it because the cart was 'made over' from an old
      > or favorite cart and just pegged to keep it together to go into the grave,
      > or was there some symbolic/religious reason? You also have to consider
      > that just about everything in the grave was crushed flat & broken into
      > pieces by the overburden (dirt) and had to be conserved with limited
      > technology (no freeze drying or P.E.G.) then put together like a giant
      > jigsaw puzzle
      >
      >
      > regards Brusi of Orkney
      >
      >
      Brusi--thakka ydr fyrir! I've never had the good fortune to see the
      actual wagon; it wasn't included in the only good Norse museum tour to
      come within my reach. So I've seen a few photos, and those were of the
      reconstruction.

      Just as you suggest, I looked at the harness and assumed. And of course,
      the reconstructors had to make their own assumptions, such as whether that
      little bit of organic matter was an important remnant of a key mechanism
      or just a termite turd. And they're probably all dead and unquestionable
      by now.

      Nice point you make, also, about the nonfunctional features that may be
      relics of something that once functioned. One more possibility we should
      always keep in mind, as we look at the tiny sample that's come down to us
      from a very rich and diverse world.

      Again, thank you for some very constructive criticism!

      Ulfhedinn
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