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Re: [medievalsawdust] Re: New here,....Intro.

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  • James W. Pratt, Jr.
    Wecome Asa of the Wood I like your work! I am not a carver and am currently very busy helping the Countess Sharra build a mundain house in the woods of
    Message 1 of 13 , Dec 15, 2003
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      Wecome Asa of the Wood

      I like your work! I am not a carver and am currently very busy helping the
      Countess Sharra build a mundain house in the woods of Southern Ohio. I am
      interested in the " (and some on Period textile-working tools, but only
      because they're wooden tools)" Because we have several ladies that spin and
      weave in the area...and I like building tools!

      James Cunningham

      ----- Original Message -----
      From: "windsingersmoon" <asa.wood@...>
      To: <medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com>
      Sent: Monday, December 15, 2003 12:30 PM
      Subject: [medievalsawdust] Re: New here,....Intro.


      > (a note on the links,....turns out ya have to copy paste the
      > angelfire address onto the address bar, and add the 'l' to the end,
      > to get there. At the site, my sca brother (who did a Wonderful job
      > of it!!) has been adding things that I didn't even know were there
      > (and some I haven't a clue where he found them,.....they're 'mine'
      > but I don't know where he located them, as I don't remember
      > telling/giving them to him,.....oh well, looks good any ole way)
      >
      > But I've discovered he's built a game out of finding pix.
      > Not everything is available from the first page.
      > Ya have to go to a picture/page of 1-3 pictures, and look to the
      > bottom of the page, to find a path to other pix. Each page seems to
      > have different pix to see at the bottom. i.e. I'm still finding
      > new ones there,.....:-< <G>
      > Shara
      >
      > > I'll make furniture, but it's the carvings I'm most experienced at.
      > > I look forward to the give and take on this board.
      > > Shara (ps, y'all can see examples of my works on the following
      > links:
      > >
      > http://www.angelfire.com/ga/waterbearingfish/marcherlord/asashara.htm
      > > l
      > > http://www.housebarra.com/asa/
      >
      >
      >
      > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
      > medievalsawdust-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
      >
      >
      >
      > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
      >
      >
    • windsingersmoon
      ... do you hale? Glad ya came to join us... ... ***************************************************************** Georgia, about an hour west of Atlanta.
      Message 2 of 13 , Dec 15, 2003
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        --- In medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com, "James Winkler"
        <jrwinkler@m...> wrote:
        > Greetings Shara -
        >
        > WOW... what an introduction... nice stuff out there. From where
        do you hale? Glad ya' came to join us...
        >
        > Chas. Oakley
        *****************************************************************
        Georgia, about an hour west of Atlanta.
        Thankyou
        <<<<GGGG>>>>>
        Shara
      • windsingersmoon
        ... links... From what part of the Kingdom do you hail? ... Meridies Shara
        Message 3 of 13 , Dec 15, 2003
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          --- In medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com, kjworz@c... wrote:
          >
          > Welcome!
          >
          > You never said, and it is difficult to discern from the web
          links... From what part of the Kingdom do you hail?
          >
          >
          > --
          > -Chirho
          > Shire of Roxbury Mill, Kingdom of Atlantia
          > Silver Spring, MD
          >
          > ***************************************************************
          Meridies
          Shara
          >
        • windsingersmoon
          ... helping the ... Ohio. I am ... only ... that spin and ... Please tell Countess Sharra, that my lord and I were in a Wendy s in GA, next to I-20,....my
          Message 4 of 13 , Dec 15, 2003
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            --- In medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com, "James W. Pratt, Jr."
            <cunning@f...> wrote:
            > Wecome Asa of the Wood
            >
            > I like your work! I am not a carver and am currently very busy
            helping the
            > Countess Sharra build a mundain house in the woods of Southern
            Ohio. I am
            > interested in the " (and some on Period textile-working tools, but
            only
            > because they're wooden tools)" Because we have several ladies
            that spin and
            > weave in the area...and I like building tools!
            >
            > James Cunningham
            >
            Please tell Countess Sharra, that my lord and I were in a
            Wendy's in GA, next to I-20,....my lord came back to the table to
            tell me, : "there's a girl, at the counter, who's name tag
            says 'Shara'"
            We went several more times. She was always there.
            One day I made a point of going to the counter to ask her about her
            name (make a note here, the girl was about 18-20) I said it
            was 'very unusual' and asked if she knew why her parents had chosen
            it ?" She said she had asked her mother,....and her mother told
            her she had "Made it up" I smiled at the girl, and looked at my
            own wrist, where I turned a well-worn beaded name bracelet around
            for her to see. On the bracelet, were letter beads spelling out the
            name "Shara" As she looked at the bracelet in total amazement,
            I didn't bother telling her it had only been my name for 21+ years,
            and I didn't tell her where it originated,....but I'd love to have
            been a fly on the wall when she got home ! <GGGGGG>
            Shara (I LOve beilding the tools ! the House Barra site has pix
            of an sca demo and workshop I'd done, with a number of my antique
            tool collection on display. Some are Medieval and Viking
            reproductions, the rest are all tools known in period.
            Not much in the way of local textile workers here, I mostly make for
            displays. What I think of as bringing the 'Museum out of the books
            and into real hands, to look at." My most prized books are my
            museum catalogs, with clear photos and measurements, and when I'm
            lucky, line drawings.
            S.
          • James W. Pratt, Jr.
            Could you give me the were to find on a museum catalog that has the most viking/early period fiber working tools? James Cunningham What I think of as
            Message 5 of 13 , Dec 16, 2003
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              Could you give me the "were to find" on a museum catalog that has the most
              viking/early period fiber working tools?

              James Cunningham

              What I think of as bringing the 'Museum out of the books
              > and into real hands, to look at." My most prized books are my
              > museum catalogs, with clear photos and measurements, and when I'm
              > lucky, line drawings.
            • asa.wood@excite.com
              Ugh. Lemme think about it. We re currently in the process of clearing ALL the thousands of books of our library out of the house, to save them from the roof
              Message 6 of 13 , Dec 17, 2003
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                Ugh.
                Lemme think about it.
                We're currently in the process of clearing ALL the thousands of
                books of our library out of the house, to save them from the roof
                caving in,.......but as we get them out, and pack them dryly, we've
                been packing them according to subject matter. (i.e. all the Viking
                books are in 2 large bins,....) IF I have anything (I saw something
                yesterday that might be the best I have on that subject),...
                Your very best bet would likely be from the books put out in York,
                England. (that's where the books came from I glanced at, on their
                way to storage) i.e. seems like one did have a number of wooden
                textile things in it,.......if you can't find the address in a
                search engine, I may be able to find it for you. The Museum,
                there at the Jorvik center (seems like 'York Trust' is what you want
                to search under) has quite a new books (museum catalogs) on
                archeological finds. Also check the National Museum of Ireland.
                They too, have a number of books on Viking finds. In fact, my VERY
                most favorite book from there, is called "Viking-Age Decorated Wood"
                (Randalin,......heads up,......this is the same book you were so
                page by page enjoying looking at, last night. I Think I can get at
                my cards to look up the author,....Lang, James T.
                While I have the list out, I'll chck on those York books I have.

                Haven't found them yet, but there Is another unique book:
                Earwood, Caroline - "Domestic Wooden Artifacts" that concentrates
                mostly on ones of the Celtic/Vikings/Ireland area.
                Be warned though. While there's stuff in this book I've seen no-
                where else, the book is also VERY expensive. I'd expected to find
                it Far more heavily illustrated than it turned out to be

                Okay, one of the York books :

                Mainman, A.J. + Rogers "Small Finds - Craft, Industry, and Everyday
                Life" York Archeological Trust, York, Eng.

                Hmmmmmm may have to go check my bins,........dreddddd,....it's cold
                out there,....I'm typing wearing gloves, in here,.....oh, well, I'm
                dressed for the outside,....Okay,...that solves That mystery,....I
                knew I had um, but when I checked, they weren't in my
                records,....for a very good reason,....seems I failed to put them
                there,....! But,....brought them in, to fix that, and can tell ya
                for sure, which has what.

                Ah Ha
                The book (Mainman)has "Finds from Anglo-Scandanavian York"
                LOTSA stone etc. spindle whorls, and honeing stones,lotsa amber
                beads and pendants, glass works bits, pottery bits, loom weights,
                bronze needles, soapstone bits and 'lamps', spoons, metal bits etc.,
                scale parts, weights, A Hnefatafl game I've missed reproducing
                somehow,....I need to tell some one about, playing pieces, strap
                ends,and buckles,brooches, NICE pins !, rings,pendants, lotsa glass
                beads, toilet impliments, carved stone pieces, etc.

                Another of the York books (one of two I forgot to record,
                somehow,....I had a rule, after I statrted to record newly bought
                books, to never put away a book until after it was recorded and
                given a Lib code number, which went on all copies made from the
                books for my files,......no more wondering where what came
                from,...look up the code on the page, and go pull the book. This
                was a total necessity when I competed.

                Anyway.
                The following book is one that got missed:

                Morris, Carole A. Wood and Woodworking in Anglo-Scandanavia and
                Medieval York"/ The Archeology of York The Small Finds 17/13 Craft,
                Industry and Everyday Life
                Around 250 pages to the book GOOD BOOK !!!! Lotsa Treenware, etc
                in it (and some textile tools) How many, I can't say without going
                through the book page by page. But as far as I know I'm not sure
                there Is a book exclusively on Viking-age wooden Textile tools.

                'Wood' doesn't survive near as well as other matrials, and so it's
                often one of the most difficult things to research, in regards to
                looking for primary source examples. In my home library,...this
                book, and the Lang one from Dublin (National Museum) are the two,
                VERY best books I have on Viking Wood things. The Earwood book is
                my third best.

                When you're looking at wood that has survived, you Need to keep in
                mind that what you see (in the catalogs) is the best they were able
                to preserve what they found,...that more often than not, the object
                has lost wood from the long-grain edges. i.e. you need to mentally
                fill in more wood, along the long sides of most pieces. Randalin
                was asking me about that, last night, when she was looking at the
                remains of a bowl from Dublin,....it looked like the bowl was long
                and narrow,.....but in truth, it was turned 'round' when it was
                first made, and most likely turned 'green' as it was easier to work.
                When the bowl finished drying/shrinking, it always winds up oval-
                shaped, due to the way the long sides shrink more than the ends.
                Then the bowl gets buried for many hundreds of years,....the long
                sides of the wood are weaker, and more inclined to break off, along
                the grain, resulting in the archeologist finding/rescueing more in
                length, than width. There's also a certain amount of distortion to
                keep in mind. Back in my early research days, I was constantly
                puzzled by a certain wooden (Viking) cup which had been found. The
                shape of it was strange looking, til it eventually dawned on me that
                it was shaped that way by the tons of earth that had crushed down
                upon it, and the archeologists/restorers had simply cleaned it, and
                preserved it, without attempting to try and force the poor tortured
                wood back into it's original shape, which was "U"-shaped (it
                looks 'D'-shaped in the photos/line-drawings)

                I showed Randalin a piece found in Dublin, identified as a 'cross
                arm/hammer' something. I disagree. For Many reasons, I
                believe it was simply a child's wooden ax head. I enlarged it to
                found size, then followed the curvature of the sides, and they
                curved out un-equally, clearly creating the front end of a Viking ax
                head, child size. I reproduced it, whole, as such (No, it's not in
                any of the pix. I have a number of Viking toys and textile tool
                reproductions that have not yet made it in front of my camera
                lense,...something I need to correct)
                The Lang book states though, that their purpose is no to interpret,
                but to record the finds. I have loved that book so much, it's
                almost falling apart, from where I've xeroxed so much out of it for
                my files, and enlarged SO many pieces to actual size, to reproduce.
                For the Viking-age woodcrafter/carver, I can't stress it's value
                enough.

                Another good book to add to any Viking library is "From Viking to
                Crusader" I found it at Pennsic, almost a doz. years ago, and
                hesitated to spend the 65$ on it the merchant wanted,.....but, like
                the Lang book, I have xeroxed it near to death, for EVery thing it
                has in it ! (the Earwood book cost more, 3 or 4 years later, and
                had not a fraction the illustrations as the V-C. book) Lotsa wood
                stuff in it (and more) it also contains the large platter Randalin
                is making steady progress on)

                Don't know if I've answered your question or not.
                But do check out the two museums of available books. They've both,
                no doubt added more since I last looked in on them. The Lang book I
                bought At the museum, their last, on-shelf copy, at the time, but
                I've since seen that Amazon has it, so ya might check there, first.
                The York books, you can probably have to order from them. I used a
                credit card, and it took FOREVER for them to arrive by slow boat,
                but they're good books. Oh, the other one I had forgotten to
                record of theirs, was another 'Small Finds" book on bone,
                antler,ivory, horn" There's spoons, lucets (!!!!) LOTSA combs,
                pins, etc in it.
                Enjoy the quest.
                Shara




                --- In medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com, "James W. Pratt, Jr."
                <cunning@f...> wrote:
                > Could you give me the "were to find" on a museum catalog that has
                the most
                > viking/early period fiber working tools?
                >
                > James Cunningham
                >
                > What I think of as bringing the 'Museum out of the books
                > > and into real hands, to look at." My most prized books are my
                > > museum catalogs, with clear photos and measurements, and when I'm
                > > lucky, line drawings.
              • James W. Pratt, Jr.
                Thanks for the work in the cold!! James Cunningham snip----- Original Message ----- IF I have anything (I saw something ... snip
                Message 7 of 13 , Dec 17, 2003
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                  Thanks for the work in the cold!!

                  James Cunningham

                  snip----- Original Message ----- IF I have anything (I saw something
                  > yesterday that might be the best I have on that subject),...
                  > Your very best bet would likely be from the books put out in York,
                  > England. (that's where the books came from I glanced at, on their
                  > way to storage) i.e. seems like one did have a number of wooden
                  > textile things in it,.......if you can't find the address in a
                  > search engine, I may be able to find it for you. The Museum,
                  > there at the Jorvik center (seems like 'York Trust' is what you want
                  > to search under) has quite a new books (museum catalogs) on
                  > archeological finds.
                  snip
                • windsingersmoon
                  The York site is : http://www.yorkarch.demon.co.uk/pubs.htm ... something ... York, ... their ... Museum, ... want
                  Message 8 of 13 , Dec 18, 2003
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                    The York site is :
                    http://www.yorkarch.demon.co.uk/pubs.htm

                    --- In medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com, "James W. Pratt, Jr."
                    <cunning@f...> wrote:
                    > Thanks for the work in the cold!!
                    >
                    > James Cunningham
                    >
                    > snip----- Original Message ----- IF I have anything (I saw
                    something
                    > > yesterday that might be the best I have on that subject),...
                    > > Your very best bet would likely be from the books put out in
                    York,
                    > > England. (that's where the books came from I glanced at, on
                    their
                    > > way to storage) i.e. seems like one did have a number of wooden
                    > > textile things in it,.......if you can't find the address in a
                    > > search engine, I may be able to find it for you. The
                    Museum,
                    > > there at the Jorvik center (seems like 'York Trust' is what you
                    want
                    > > to search under) has quite a new books (museum catalogs) on
                    > > archeological finds.
                    > snip
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