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Re: [MedievalSawdust] Reaction wood? (was: early period turned cup)

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  • Brian Starke
    Eucalyptus always twists as it dries. Because eucalyptus grows very fast, in California there are large woods of eucalyptus planted for the purpose of making
    Message 1 of 29 , Dec 20, 2009
      Eucalyptus always twists as it dries.  Because eucalyptus grows very fast, in California there are large woods of eucalyptus planted for the purpose of making railroad ties.  Unfortunately, when the trees were cut the resulting ties twisted so badly that they were useless.  So the eucalyptus trees were abandoned where they grew.

      So my brother-in-law told me, and I will continue to believe him until someone gives me contrary information.
      -------------------------------------------------------------------
      Geoffrey Featherstonehaugh
      known in the modern world as Brian E. Starke

    • Eric
      Ralg, I reference the woodworking book often and it does indeed discuss which finds are end grain and which are face turned. In addition to the pottery book,
      Message 2 of 29 , Dec 20, 2009
        Ralg,

        I reference the woodworking book often and it does indeed discuss which finds are end grain and which are face turned.

        In addition to the pottery book, they also have books on the iron work finds, the non-ferrous metal finds and leatherwork, amongst other titles.

        I should apologize, I'm on vacation in Kailua/Kona, away from my books so I can't cite each of these books properly.

        In Service to the Dream,
        Eirikr Mjoksiglandi
        Ashgrove, Barony of Angels, Caid

        --- In medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com, "n7bsn" <n7bsn@...> wrote:
        >
        >
        >
        > and worth the investment, great work. But I'm not recalling any reference to the grain orientation in the cores.
        >
        > BTW, visiting the dig is a little like visiting Disney does Jorvik. Although the live demo's after the "action ride" were better.
        >
        > If you are interested in pottery, they have a great book on that too (gave one to our local pottery laurel and I thought she would die of happy)
        >
        > Ralg
        > AnTir
        >
      • n7bsn
        ... If you check the following photo, you will see something like what you describe
        Message 3 of 29 , Dec 22, 2009
          --- In medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com, Wm G <wagrot@...> wrote:
          >
          > Point. I have looked at turned cups in the museum in London and saw a
          > metal insert (think copper freeze plug) in the center of the bottom of
          > the cup - My theory is it was to protect from the massive soak-in of
          > liquids in the core wood (the cups were turned from limbs centered at
          > the core). There was some sort of mark stamped in the copper coin as
          > well, so it may have served as a makers mark.
          > Riley G.

          If you check the following photo, you will see something like what you describe
          http://3.bp.blogspot.com/_dMeLSAcoyho/SvGdy06Ib6I/AAAAAAAABek/9_K1X7dWulI/s1600-h/11-individual.jpg

          Since it's burl, I don't think we can give any real idea of wood-grain direction, but that certainly looks like a metal plug in the center

          Photo from Robin Wood's blog, where he states it's a 13th C mazer from Canterbury

          TTFN
          Ralg
          AnTir
        • Jeff
          I m thinking that this is a communion cup, and that s probably Jesus on the disk. Jeff/Geoff
          Message 4 of 29 , Dec 23, 2009
            I'm thinking that this is a communion cup, and that's probably Jesus on the disk.

            Jeff/Geoff

            > --- In medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com, Wm G <wagrot@> wrote:
            > >
            > > Point. I have looked at turned cups in the museum in London and saw a
            > > metal insert (think copper freeze plug) in the center of the bottom of
            > > the cup - My theory is it was to protect from the massive soak-in of
            > > liquids in the core wood (the cups were turned from limbs centered at
            > > the core). There was some sort of mark stamped in the copper coin as
            > > well, so it may have served as a makers mark.
            > > Riley G.
            >
            > If you check the following photo, you will see something like what you describe
            > http://3.bp.blogspot.com/_dMeLSAcoyho/SvGdy06Ib6I/AAAAAAAABek/9_K1X7dWulI/s1600-h/11-individual.jpg
            >
            > Since it's burl, I don't think we can give any real idea of wood-grain direction, but that certainly looks like a metal plug in the center
            >
            > Photo from Robin Wood's blog, where he states it's a 13th C mazer from Canterbury
            >
            > TTFN
            > Ralg
            > AnTir
            >
          • Jeff
            Or for baptism, and it s John. Me again. I really ought stop talking to myself....
            Message 5 of 29 , Dec 23, 2009
              Or for baptism, and it's John.

              Me again. I really ought stop talking to myself....

              --- In medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com, "Jeff" <jljonsn@...> wrote:
              >
              >
              > I'm thinking that this is a communion cup, and that's probably Jesus on the disk.
              >
              > Jeff/Geoff
              >
              > > --- In medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com, Wm G <wagrot@> wrote:
              > > >
              > > > Point. I have looked at turned cups in the museum in London and saw a
              > > > metal insert (think copper freeze plug) in the center of the bottom of
              > > > the cup - My theory is it was to protect from the massive soak-in of
              > > > liquids in the core wood (the cups were turned from limbs centered at
              > > > the core). There was some sort of mark stamped in the copper coin as
              > > > well, so it may have served as a makers mark.
              > > > Riley G.
              > >
              > > If you check the following photo, you will see something like what you describe
              > > http://3.bp.blogspot.com/_dMeLSAcoyho/SvGdy06Ib6I/AAAAAAAABek/9_K1X7dWulI/s1600-h/11-individual.jpg
              > >
              > > Since it's burl, I don't think we can give any real idea of wood-grain direction, but that certainly looks like a metal plug in the center
              > >
              > > Photo from Robin Wood's blog, where he states it's a 13th C mazer from Canterbury
              > >
              > > TTFN
              > > Ralg
              > > AnTir
              > >
              >
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