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Re: How would you....

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  • fantasydesigns2002
    First off, if i was doing them for sale, the first thing i would do is take the time to build the angle jig to cut all of the pie pieces, then insted of going
    Message 1 of 8 , Nov 11, 2009
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      First off, if i was doing them for sale, the first thing i would do is take the time to build the angle jig to cut all of the pie pieces, then insted of going with each section round, i would go with the outside round, but cut all the inside pieces flat for a better gluing structure, and easier assembly..

      That's just how i would go about it for production.......

      Mike

      --- In medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com, Conal O'hAirt Jim Hart <baronconal@...> wrote:
      >
      > How would you go about making a byzantine chess board?
      >
      > Lots of tapered pieces..... I'm not sure my tools are of sufficient
      > quality to do this easily... 1/2 of a degree off somewhere and it
      > won't work.....
      >
      > I'm looking for cheats to make it fast enough so that the customer
      > can afford it.....
      >
      > Link to drawing of one
      >
      > I've thought about veneer...... but that is a lot more pieces than
      > I have tackled before
      >
      > Baron Conal O'hAirt / Jim Hart
      >
      > Aude Aliquid Dignum
      > ' Dare Something Worthy '
      >
    • Trevor Payne
      For cost effective reasons I would use one solid piece of board, then tape off, then stain the alternating squares. To add a bit more depth to the piece I
      Message 2 of 8 , Nov 11, 2009
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        For cost effective reasons I would use one solid piece of board, then tape off, then stain the alternating squares. To add a bit more depth to the piece I would carve out the grid. Drill the center out with a big hole saw, sand, then apply linseed oil or varnish.

        Aiden




        How would you go about making a byzantine chess board?


        I'm looking for cheats to make it fast enough so that the customer
        can afford it.....
      • Bill McNutt
        That was my first thought. Veneer could be cut with a knife, and quickly enough that the hours wouldn t mount up. Get large enough pieces, and you could
        Message 3 of 8 , Nov 11, 2009
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          That was my first thought.  Veneer could be cut with a knife, and quickly enough that the hours wouldn’t mount up.   Get large enough pieces, and you could double the squares and make 2 at the same time.

           

          Will

           

          From: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com [mailto:medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Conal O'hAirt Jim Hart
          Sent: Tuesday, November 10, 2009 5:36 PM
          To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: [MedievalSawdust] How would you....

           

           

          How would you go about making a byzantine chess board?

          Lots of tapered pieces..... I'm not sure my tools are of sufficient
          quality to do this easily...  1/2 of a degree off somewhere and it
          won't work.....

          I'm looking for cheats to make it fast enough so that the customer
          can afford it.....

          Link to drawing of one

          I've thought about veneer...... but that is a lot more pieces than
          I have tackled before

           

          Baron Conal O'hAirt / Jim Hart

          Aude Aliquid Dignum
          ' Dare Something Worthy '

           

           

        • avery1415@sbcglobal.net
          Making some 1/8-1/4 stock and doing inlay or maquetry seems like a good plan to me. If I was married to the idea of hardwood, I d do everything I could to
          Message 4 of 8 , Nov 11, 2009
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            Making some 1/8-1/4 stock and doing inlay or maquetry seems like a good plan to me. If I was married to the idea of hardwood, I'd do everything I could to make the pieces index one another, so I'd start out a lot like Sean did.

            I'd find two planks slightly wider than half as wide as I want my board to be.
            I'd loosely glue them together with a layer of craft paper between them.
            I'd cut the circles with the thinest kerf bandsaw blade I could lay my hands on.
            I'd split them apart and swap every other half-ring and reglue those with something like clear a clear epoxy.
            I'd resand the surfaces of my two half hardwood archery targets and stick them back together with the craftpaper trick.
            I'd cut off the excess wood (the slightly wider bit where I planed to put the center point of my circle cutting jig).
            I'd cut the whole thing in half.
            I'd cut two 45 deg.triangles out of plywood and screw them to a table saw sled. Then I'd use that to cut each half in half on the angle.
            I'd make two 67.5 deg triangles, put those on the sled and use that to cut my quadrants in half.
            I'd split the eight wedges again, swap them and glue them together.
            I'd cut the inner perimeter and outer perimeter, make the circle I was going to used as my center and fit those together using a spindle sander and holding my tounge just so.
            I'd join the center and the halves and them add my outer border.

            This way, all your lateral error in one piece is mirrored in its neighbor. Vertical error (oops, my saw blade was tilting one degree to the right) will kill you, but that one is usually easier to control.

            Avery
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