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Re: Cherry wood issue

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  • n7bsn
    ... It might, let is set a few more weeks and try a sample and see Ralg (skipping Crown Council) AnTir
    Message 1 of 9 , Nov 7, 2009
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      --- In medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com, "Stu" <stu.shan@...> wrote:


      >
      > Yeah, we did. We got 40C here and likely hotter in the enclosed carport/deck I have the wood in. Don't suppose there is any chance it will just er "relax" now the rainy season is here? I love the colours and hand feel of this wood and would hate to loose it.
      >

      It might, let is set a few more weeks and try a sample and see

      Ralg (skipping Crown Council)
      AnTir
    • Stu
      ... Will give that a shot Aleyn (skipping everything as most of our shire officially has h1n1 and we are selfish and don t want to share)
      Message 2 of 9 , Nov 7, 2009
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        --- In medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com, "n7bsn" <n7bsn@...> wrote:
        >
        >

        > It might, let is set a few more weeks and try a sample and see
        >
        > Ralg (skipping Crown Council)
        > AnTir
        >

        Will give that a shot


        Aleyn
        (skipping everything as most of our shire officially has h1n1 and we are selfish and don't want to share)
      • conradh@efn.org
        ... I ve run into the same problems with sweet cherry myself. I tried making a big dough trough, and hewing and carving involved vast effort to remove a tiny
        Message 3 of 9 , Nov 7, 2009
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          On Thu, November 5, 2009 1:43 pm, Stu wrote:

          > The last couple instruments I was making I started having an issue with
          > the wood. It was now hard and flinty, easy to chip and prone to cracks
          > invisible till I was just about done. Today I wanted to turn a wheel for
          > an organistrum, the huge great grandaddy of the hurdy-gurdy. The wheel
          > has a 4 inch diametre. No matter how sharp the tool, I could only just
          > get the finest, almost dust shavings off of it and it was nasty slow
          > slogging with frequent stops for tool touch ups. Finally 3 hours later(!)
          > I had the wheel at a point I wanted to take some sandpaper to it. Stopped
          > the lathe and the wheel was cracked radially in a dozen places.
          >

          I've run into the same problems with sweet cherry myself. I tried making
          a big dough trough, and hewing and carving involved vast effort to remove
          a tiny pile of chips.

          I just cut down a good sized cherry tree from a friend's yard, and unlike
          other cherry logs I've dealt with this one has several sections that split
          reasonably straight. It's no help to you with your own batch, but I'm
          going to follow the advice of several traditional woodworkers and do all
          the roughing out green, and as much as possible of that with froe and
          wedge instead of saws. Biggest problem with this one has been to actually
          decide in advance what I'll want to be finishing over the next few years!

          This will be my first time working cherry this way--but it works so well
          with oak and ash that I'm inclined to try. Getting it down into smaller
          pieces early will eliminate a lot of the strain that causes checking, and
          leaving the rough blanks somewhat oversize gives you some margin for
          correcting warpage--though this is far less on split wood than on sawn!

          I also always grease the endgrain heavily, including any knots that are
          exposed. I've even managed to dry madrone (Arbutus to you) this way with
          no checks, over about five years time.

          Please let us know how the various rehydration tricks that have been
          suggested work out for you. Don't see how they can heal cracks that have
          already happened, but perhaps you can improve the workability enough to
          make projects where cracks don't matter so much. At least it might save
          some pretty wood from the firewood pile.

          Ulfhedinn
        • n7bsn
          ... . Stopped ... Ya know, I have to say this is the first time I ve ever heard of anyone using grease. Wax, yes, heavy latex paint yes, wood-sealer yes.
          Message 4 of 9 , Nov 8, 2009
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            --- In medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com, conradh@... wrote:
            . Stopped


            > I also always grease the endgrain heavily, including any knots that are
            > exposed. I've even managed to dry madrone (Arbutus to you) this way with
            > no checks, over about five years time.
            >

            Ya know, I have to say this is the first time I've ever heard of anyone using grease. Wax, yes, heavy latex paint yes, wood-sealer yes. Grease, nope.

            Considering all the other options, I don't think I would try it myself.

            Have you ever tried to boil Madrone, no I'm not kidding. We boil it all the time here, usually never thicker then 2 inches. But boil it we do. Slabs, roughed blanks, chunks.

            Have a nearly zero failure rate.

            I usually boil for a couple hours, then let it cool. Remove and wood and that's it. I seldom wax or seal the wood. The current batch went straight to waiting for finish turning

            http://pics.livejournal.com/hrollaug/pic/0006dekf.jpg
            http://pics.livejournal.com/hrollaug/pic/0006b1kr.jpg

            TTFN
            Ralg
            AnTir
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