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hand plane 'rest' position

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  • kjworz@comcast.net
    On another list I am on they are debating the wisdom and reasoning of the old shop teacher admonition of lay your plane on it s side when not in use because
    Message 1 of 9 , Nov 28, 2003
      On another list I am on they are debating the wisdom and reasoning of the old shop teacher admonition of "lay your plane on it's side when not in use because if you set it down on it's blade you will dull the blade."

      Now I don't want to open the same can of worms here, but it did get me thinking about the illustration on this group's yahoo page. There, the woodworker is planing with a jointer and has a smooth plane on the bench in front of him. The smooth plane is resting on its blade, so HIS shop teacher in High School didn't train him to lay it on it's side. And I can think of no period illustration where an unused plane is left on it's side.

      Does anyone remember an instance from a period illustration where a plane is left on its side?




      [full disclosure: i lay my planes on the bench blade down. many reasons. the best reason is Frank Klaus and Jim Kingshott told me to do it that way and I never took shop so I never had a teacher train me otherwise]


      -chirho
    • Conal O'hAirt Jim Hart
      ... Did he give a reason to NOT lay them on their sides? ===== Baron Conal O hAirt / Jim Hart Seneschal, Barony of Fenix Aude Aliquid Dignum Dare Something
      Message 2 of 9 , Nov 28, 2003
        > [full disclosure: i lay my planes on the bench blade
        > down. many reasons. the best reason is Frank Klaus
        > and Jim Kingshott told me to do it that way and I
        > never took shop so I never had a teacher train me
        > otherwise]
        >
        >
        > -chirho
        >


        Did he give a reason to NOT lay them
        on their sides?


        =====
        Baron Conal O'hAirt / Jim Hart
        Seneschal, Barony of Fenix

        Aude Aliquid Dignum
        ' Dare Something Worthy '

        __________________________________
        Do you Yahoo!?
        Free Pop-Up Blocker - Get it now
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      • Lord Alessandro dEste
        ... On another list I am on they are debating the wisdom and reasoning of the old shop teacher admonition of lay your plane on it s side when not in use
        Message 3 of 9 , Nov 29, 2003
          --- In medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com, kjworz@c... wrote:
          On another list I am on they are debating the wisdom and reasoning of
          the old shop teacher admonition of "lay your plane on it's side when
          not in use because if you set it down on it's blade you will dull the
          blade."the illustration on this group's yahoo page. There, the
          woodworker is planing with a jointer and has a smooth plane on the
          bench in front of him. The smooth plane is resting on its blade, so
          HIS shop teacher in High School didn't train him to lay it on it's
          side. And I can think of no period illustration where an unused plane
          is left on it's side. Does anyone remember an instance from a period
          illustration where a plane is left on its side?>

          >> -chirho

          In the illustration we must remeber that it is a artistical view we
          are seeing. Not from the point of view of the worker. If you were
          drawing a plane would you show it up right or on its side? In any
          illustration be it a period illustration or not. I dont beleave you
          will ever see proper tool handling and care taught.

          IYS
          Alessandro d'Este
        • C N Schwartz
          I don t know. An artist may do it represent what he sees improperly or may just as inadvertently show the plane exactly as the workman left it. It could go
          Message 4 of 9 , Nov 29, 2003
            I don't know. An artist may do it represent what he sees improperly or may
            just as inadvertently show the plane exactly as the workman left it. It
            could go either way. The pic on the front page of our group is excellent in
            the detail of shop contents it shows. Plus the distaff is accurate, or
            modern fiber folks copy that ribbon tying around it almost exactly.



            -----Original Message-----
            From: Lord Alessandro dEste [mailto:avalonbear@...]


            >> -chirho

            In the illustration we must remeber that it is a artistical view we
            are seeing. Not from the point of view of the worker. If you were
            drawing a plane would you show it up right or on its side? In any
            illustration be it a period illustration or not. I dont beleave you
            will ever see proper tool handling and care taught.

            IYS
            Alessandro d'Este
          • C N Schwartz
            Reasons NOT to lay a plane on it s side. 1. Metal planes (bailey pattern) sides aren t as wide as wooden planes so they d tip more easily, maybe crash to the
            Message 5 of 9 , Nov 29, 2003
              Reasons NOT to lay a plane on it's side.

              1. Metal planes (bailey pattern) sides aren't as wide as wooden planes so
              they'd tip more easily, maybe crash to the floor. If I dropped a Bedrock
              and the casting cracked I would cry hot, snotty tears of shame and anguish.
              2. Blade down and you can't hit the blade accidentally with a chisel, file,
              or another cast iron plane, ruining your sharpening job.
              3. The bench isn't going to dull a blade THAT much at all. Your bench isn't
              made of stone, after all.
              4. A metal plane has a positive set and you won't knock the blade out of set
              by setting it down on the blade.

              Number 2 is the most compelling argument.




              -----Original Message-----
              From: Conal O'hAirt Jim Hart [mailto:baronconal@...]
              Sent: Friday, November 28, 2003 9:08 PM
              To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
              Subject: Re: [medievalsawdust] hand plane 'rest' position



              > [full disclosure: i lay my planes on the bench blade
              > down. many reasons. the best reason is Frank Klaus
              > and Jim Kingshott told me to do it that way and I
              > never took shop so I never had a teacher train me
              > otherwise]
              >
              >
              > -chirho
              >


              Did he give a reason to NOT lay them
              on their sides?


              =====
              Baron Conal O'hAirt / Jim Hart
              Seneschal, Barony of Fenix

              Aude Aliquid Dignum
              ' Dare Something Worthy '

              __________________________________
              Do you Yahoo!?
              Free Pop-Up Blocker - Get it now
              http://companion.yahoo.com/


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            • B.S.R.Lee
              I was book browsing the other night and found a copy of V. Chinnery s
              Message 6 of 9 , Dec 5, 2003
                I was book browsing the other night and found a copy of V. Chinnery's
                '<http://www.amazon.co.uk/exec/obidos/ASIN/1851490132>Oak<http://www.amazon.co.uk/exec/obidos/ASIN/1851490132>
                Furniture: The British Tradition '.

                Seems it has been re-printed - you can order it from Amazon UK but not the
                US store - just another example of the Amazon strangeness.

                regards
                Brusi of Orkney
              • Tim Bray
                ... I d say the question should be the other way around. Why would you lay them that way, exposing the blade to damage? How is laying them blade-down on the
                Message 7 of 9 , Dec 6, 2003
                  >Did he give a reason to NOT lay them
                  >on their sides?

                  I'd say the question should be the other way around. Why would you lay
                  them that way, exposing the blade to damage? How is laying them blade-down
                  on the bench supposed to do more harm than _using_ them blade-down?

                  That whole argument about laying them on their sides never made any sense
                  to me at all. It's kind of like worrying about how to sheathe your sword,
                  after using it to hack at people in armor.

                  Cheers,
                  Colin


                  Albion Works
                  Furniture and Accessories
                  For the Medievalist!
                  http://www.albionworks.net
                  http://www.albionworks.com
                • Bill McNutt
                  FOURTY POUNDS! *sigh* Why do good books have to be so expensive. Will ... Chinnery s ... w.amazon.co.uk/exec/obidos/ASIN/1851490132 ... not the
                  Message 8 of 9 , Jan 6, 2004
                    FOURTY POUNDS! *sigh*

                    Why do good books have to be so expensive.

                    Will

                    --- In medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com, "B.S.R.Lee" <bsrlee@z...>
                    wrote:
                    > I was book browsing the other night and found a copy of V.
                    Chinnery's
                    > '<http://www.amazon.co.uk/exec/obidos/ASIN/1851490132>Oak<http://ww
                    w.amazon.co.uk/exec/obidos/ASIN/1851490132>
                    > Furniture: The British Tradition '.
                    >
                    > Seems it has been re-printed - you can order it from Amazon UK but
                    not the
                    > US store - just another example of the Amazon strangeness.
                    >
                    > regards
                    > Brusi of Orkney
                  • Tim Bray
                    Welcome, Will! ... This particular one is worth it, though. Try a used bookstore search; it was distributed in America a few years ago. (After I lugged my
                    Message 9 of 9 , Jan 6, 2004
                      Welcome, Will!

                      >FOURTY POUNDS! *sigh*
                      >
                      >Why do good books have to be so expensive.

                      This particular one is worth it, though. Try a used bookstore search; it
                      was distributed in America a few years ago. (After I lugged my copy home
                      from England... that book has Mass!)

                      Cheers,
                      Colin


                      Albion Works
                      Furniture and Accessories
                      For the Medievalist!
                      http://www.albionworks.net
                      http://www.albionworks.com
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