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"Rohirric" Chest - finished!

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  • Tim Bray
    I finally completed this project, and had a pro take some photos of it. You can see them at: http://www.albionworks.net/Rohirric/page1.htm Photos of it in
    Message 1 of 27 , Nov 26, 2003
      I finally completed this project, and had a pro take some photos of
      it. You can see them at:
      http://www.albionworks.net/Rohirric/page1.htm

      Photos of it "in progress" are in the Photos section of this Group, in the
      folder "Colin deBray."

      Not period, or rather a mish-mash of several periods with fantasy holding
      them together, but it was a wild project. In addition to all the weird
      joinery (clamped-front, tusk-tenons, frame-and panel, even dovetails!),
      this was my first ammonia-fuming project, and also a new finishing
      technique for me (oil and shellac).

      Whew. This thing put me behind schedule, and now I have to try to catch
      up... at this time of year? Sheesh.

      Cheers,
      Colin


      Albion Works
      Furniture and Accessories
      For the Medievalist!
      http://www.albionworks.net
      http://www.albionworks.com
    • Steve
      That is beautifu work I love the way the quarter sawn grain shows. I was wondering if you do your own ironwork or you contract out. I am looking for a source
      Message 2 of 27 , Nov 28, 2003
        That is beautifu work I love the way the quarter sawn grain shows. I
        was wondering if you do your own ironwork or you contract out. I am
        looking for a source for locks, hinges and such. Any help you could
        send my way would be greatly appriciated.

        Steve Vaught
        Lord Grey's Retinue
      • Tim Bray
        Thanks very much! The ironwork is from two sources: the hinges and handles are from Lee Valley, and the lock is from a Canadian company, Quincaillerie
        Message 3 of 27 , Nov 28, 2003
          Thanks very much! The ironwork is from two sources: the hinges and handles
          are from Lee Valley, and the lock is from a Canadian company, Quincaillerie
          Classique. That's the only commercial source for a medievaloid lock that I
          have found. In fact it would be pretty easy to make one just like it: it's
          a regular sliding-bar cabinet lock, riveted to a rectangular iron
          plate. The hasp is fabricated from scratch, with a staple riveted onto it
          to engage the sliding bar.
          http://www.classique-hardware.com/index-english.html

          Cheers,
          Colin

          At 03:39 PM 11/28/03 +0000, you wrote:
          >That is beautifu work I love the way the quarter sawn grain shows. I
          >was wondering if you do your own ironwork or you contract out. I am
          >looking for a source for locks, hinges and such. Any help you could
          >send my way would be greatly appriciated.
          >
          >Steve Vaught
          >Lord Grey's Retinue
        • C N Schwartz
          That is one fine chest. Vivat. Is it a commission, something you made for a speculative sale, or for your personal use at events? ... From: Tim Bray
          Message 4 of 27 , Nov 29, 2003
            That is one fine chest. Vivat.

            Is it a commission, something you made for a speculative sale, or for your
            personal use at events?



            -----Original Message-----
            From: Tim Bray [mailto:tbray@...]
            Sent: Wednesday, November 26, 2003 10:29 PM
            To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: [medievalsawdust] "Rohirric" Chest - finished!


            I finally completed this project, and had a pro take some photos of
            it. You can see them at:
            http://www.albionworks.net/Rohirric/page1.htm

            Photos of it "in progress" are in the Photos section of this Group, in the
            folder "Colin deBray."

            Not period, or rather a mish-mash of several periods with fantasy holding
            them together, but it was a wild project. In addition to all the weird
            joinery (clamped-front, tusk-tenons, frame-and panel, even dovetails!),
            this was my first ammonia-fuming project, and also a new finishing
            technique for me (oil and shellac).

            Whew. This thing put me behind schedule, and now I have to try to catch
            up... at this time of year? Sheesh.

            Cheers,
            Colin


            Albion Works
          • Tim Bray
            ... Thanks! ... A commission. In fact the customer did the conceptual design, and I worked out how to do the joinery. Otherwise I would not have tried to do
            Message 5 of 27 , Dec 6, 2003
              That is one fine chest.  Vivat.

              Thanks!

              Is it a commission, something you made for a speculative sale, or for your
              personal use at events?

              A commission.  In fact the customer did the conceptual design, and I worked out how to do the joinery.  Otherwise I would not have tried to do those tusk-tenons on the ends in conjunction with a clamped-front; there's an inherent conflict there.  Clamped-front chests join front-to-back, not end-to-end.

              I showed this to a friend on his computer, and the photos were blurry and pixellated.  Anyone else having trouble with this?

              Thanks again,
              Colin

              http://www.albionworks.net/Rohirric/page1.htm

              Photos of it "in progress" are in the Photos section of this Group, in the
              folder "Colin deBray."
            • logan
              images were fine on my computer. regards logan ... From: Tim Bray [mailto:tbray@mcn.org] Sent: Saturday, December 06, 2003 1:26 PM To:
              Message 6 of 27 , Dec 6, 2003
                Message
                images were fine on my computer.
                 
                regards
                logan
                -----Original Message-----
                From: Tim Bray [mailto:tbray@...]
                Sent: Saturday, December 06, 2003 1:26 PM
                To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
                Subject: RE: [medievalsawdust] "Rohirric" Chest - finished!

                That is one fine chest.  Vivat.

                Thanks!

                Is it a commission, something you made for a speculative sale, or for your
                personal use at events?

                A commission.  In fact the customer did the conceptual design, and I worked out how to do the joinery.  Otherwise I would not have tried to do those tusk-tenons on the ends in conjunction with a clamped-front; there's an inherent conflict there.  Clamped-front chests join front-to-back, not end-to-end.

                I showed this to a friend on his computer, and the photos were blurry and pixellated.  Anyone else having trouble with this?

                Thanks again,
                Colin

                http://www.albionworks.net/Rohirric/page1.htm

                Photos of it "in progress" are in the Photos section of this Group, in the
                folder "Colin deBray."


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                medievalsawdust-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com



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              • mahee of acre
                ... ends in conjunction with a clamped-front What are some examples of tusk-tenons? I see sort of how you used them here, but are there other example that I
                Message 7 of 27 , Dec 15, 2003
                  > Otherwise I would not have tried to do those tusk-tenons on the
                  ends in conjunction with a clamped-front

                  What are some examples of tusk-tenons? I see sort of how you used
                  them here, but are there other example that I might look at to see
                  how they would have been used?

                  Thank you.

                  your servant,
                  mahee
                • Tom Rettie
                  ... Commonly used on trestles, bed frames, and large framework structures such as looms, printing presses, etc. Here s some more info:
                  Message 8 of 27 , Dec 15, 2003
                    Quoting mahee of acre <mahee_of_acre@...>:

                    > What are some examples of tusk-tenons? I see sort of how you used
                    > them here, but are there other example that I might look at to see
                    > how they would have been used?

                    Commonly used on trestles, bed frames, and large framework structures such as
                    looms, printing presses, etc.

                    Here's some more info:

                    http://www.his.com/~tom/sca/tusktenons.pdf

                    --
                    Tom Rettie tom@...
                    www.his.com/~tom/index.html
                  • mahee of acre
                    I am sorry, I ment a chest that uses them. Do you have any examples of a chest that uses tusk-tenons or was it only for this chest that you have ever seen or
                    Message 9 of 27 , Dec 15, 2003
                      I am sorry, I ment a chest that uses them. Do you have any examples
                      of a chest that uses tusk-tenons or was it only for this chest that
                      you have ever seen or know of them being used?

                      Thank you again,


                      your servant,
                      mahee of acre

                      --- In medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com, Tom Rettie <tom@h...> wrote:
                      > Quoting mahee of acre <mahee_of_acre@y...>:
                      >
                      > > What are some examples of tusk-tenons? I see sort of how you used
                      > > them here, but are there other example that I might look at to
                      see
                      > > how they would have been used?
                      >
                      > Commonly used on trestles, bed frames, and large framework
                      structures such as
                      > looms, printing presses, etc.
                      >
                      > Here's some more info:
                      >
                      > http://www.his.com/~tom/sca/tusktenons.pdf
                      >
                      > --
                      > Tom Rettie tom@h...
                      > www.his.com/~tom/index.html
                    • Tim Bray
                      ... They are most commonly seen in our period on trestle tables (the 15th - 16th century kind, with two supports and a horizontal stretcher, not the earlier
                      Message 10 of 27 , Dec 15, 2003
                        Mahee asked:

                        >What are some examples of tusk-tenons?

                        They are most commonly seen in our period on trestle tables (the 15th -
                        16th century kind, with two supports and a horizontal stretcher, not the
                        earlier boards-on-tressels kind). You also see them in some timber frames,
                        and in ironwork (the 14th century iron framework inside the spire of
                        Salisbury Cathedral uses them!). Yet another common use was to hold wheels
                        onto axles; the period equivalent of the cotter pin.

                        They are my second-favorite joint (after drawbored M&T) because they are so
                        strong, yet easy to knockdown and reassemble multiple times. A pain to
                        make, though.

                        Post-period, they are almost ubiquitous on Arts & Crafts furniture.

                        I recommend Tom's article!

                        Cheers,
                        Colin


                        Albion Works
                        Furniture and Accessories
                        For the Medievalist!
                        http://www.albionworks.net
                        http://www.albionworks.com
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