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Re: [MedievalSawdust] 'peaked roof' boxes

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  • powell.sean@comcast.net
    I have no idea what the medieval solution might be. I could take some guesses as to how to do it with with medieval tools. If you cut all 4 top pieces with
    Message 1 of 50 , Aug 10, 2009
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      I have no idea what the medieval solution might be. I could take some guesses as to how to do it with with medieval tools. If you cut all 4 top pieces with straight corners you can temporarily stack them together in their near finished position. Then you can take two thin srips of wood or an actual angle gage to measure the outside angle. The edge miter angle should be exactly half of that. I hope I am describing that correctly. It is important that the angle gage is perpendicular to the join line when taking the measurement.

       

      Modernly I have a CAD station that will tell me the angle if I ask the right questions. I could probably work up a heinious trig formula but I would only bother if making a lot of them.

       

      I imagine that the period solution involved 'experience' like the experience of adjusting the steel hoop length for a wooden wheel to get just the right amount of compression when it shrinks over wet wood as opposed to dry wood.

       

      Good luck!

      Sean

      ----- Original Message -----
      From: "Conal O'hAirt Jim Hart" <baronconal@...>
      To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Sunday, August 9, 2009 8:56:24 PM GMT -05:00 US/Canada Eastern
      Subject: [MedievalSawdust] 'peaked roof' boxes



      like this....


      http://s147.photobucket.com/albums/r295/ConalOhAirt/Chests%20and%20Boxes/?action=view&current=bf41-1.jpg



      I've got the formulas for figuring out the compound miters, but none of
      them come put evenly.....( simple even degrees.... )

      Anyone know any tricks for making these that do not involve making
      lots of firewood? ( as in lots of test cuts )


      The other option is making a lid without the end angles and then
      cutting it at a 45 degree and fitting a piece inside the cut....
      But that is not a clean looking as the compound miter...

      Anyone know which is the usual medieval solution to the problem?



      Baron Conal O'hAirt / Jim Hart

      Aude Aliquid Dignum
      ' Dare Something Worthy '


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    • Cheri or Anne
      I love this group.  Where else can one ask about how to clean copper pots and end up making moonshine in them!  A natural progression.   Anne Go softly and
      Message 50 of 50 , Aug 20, 2009
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        I love this group.  Where else can one ask about how to clean copper pots and end up making moonshine in them!  A natural progression.
         
        Anne

        Go softly and gently for those you meet here will be
        those you know hereafter."

        ---

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