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Re: Workbench

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  • John LaTorre
    ... You might look in the Photos section for pictures of a breakdown workbench I built for woodworking demos at events. It was freely adapted from some
    Message 1 of 10 , Jul 15 10:17 AM
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      Bayard wrote:
      >
      > Now I need to build a bench to set up behind me to hold my tools, etc. I'd like this to look like it fits late period, but disassemble for travel. Anyone have ideas to share? Smaller period bench that I can modify for travel? Sources for documentation if I try for A&S review?
      >

      You might look in the "Photos" section for pictures of a breakdown
      workbench I built for woodworking demos at events. It was freely adapted
      from some images found in "The Workbench Book" and combine elements of
      two of the illustrations. The legs come off, but when they're installed
      in the top, they're locked in place with a tensioning device as
      illustrated in the second album of files. (This tensioning device is not
      period, but my own creation. It's not seen from above, and allows the
      workbench to be set up and made reasonably stable in uneven terrain.)

      The links are:

      http://groups.yahoo.com/group/medievalsawdust/photos/album/628969802/pic/list

      and

      http://groups.yahoo.com/group/medievalsawdust/photos/album/1199335119/pic/list

      I've accommodated holdfasts in the design, along with bench dogs,
      because I like them even if they're not documentable. Otherwise, the
      bench looks good enough to pass for "period" and has proved quite up to
      the task of on-site woodworking, as hundreds of visitors to the Period
      Encampment/Demo Area at Estrella War have found.

      --Johann von Drachenfels
      West Kingdom
    • bayard_turner
      My thanks. This looks like an excellent place to start. I like the use of a winding stick for tension. It may not be documentable for this purpose, but has
      Message 2 of 10 , Jul 15 11:06 AM
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        My thanks. This looks like an excellent place to start. I like the use of a winding stick for tension. It may not be documentable for this purpose, but has been used in woodworking (frame saws) for a long time.

        Bayard

        --- In medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com, John LaTorre <jlatorre@...> wrote:
        >
        > Bayard wrote:
        > >
        > > Now I need to build a bench to set up behind me to hold my tools, etc. I'd like this to look like it fits late period, but disassemble for travel. Anyone have ideas to share? Smaller period bench that I can modify for travel? Sources for documentation if I try for A&S review?
        > >
        >
        > You might look in the "Photos" section for pictures of a breakdown
        > workbench I built for woodworking demos at events. It was freely adapted
        > from some images found in "The Workbench Book" and combine elements of
        > two of the illustrations. The legs come off, but when they're installed
        > in the top, they're locked in place with a tensioning device as
        > illustrated in the second album of files. (This tensioning device is not
        > period, but my own creation. It's not seen from above, and allows the
        > workbench to be set up and made reasonably stable in uneven terrain.)
        >
        > The links are:
        >
        > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/medievalsawdust/photos/album/628969802/pic/list
        >
        > and
        >
        > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/medievalsawdust/photos/album/1199335119/pic/list
        >
        > I've accommodated holdfasts in the design, along with bench dogs,
        > because I like them even if they're not documentable. Otherwise, the
        > bench looks good enough to pass for "period" and has proved quite up to
        > the task of on-site woodworking, as hundreds of visitors to the Period
        > Encampment/Demo Area at Estrella War have found.
        >
        > --Johann von Drachenfels
        > West Kingdom
        >
      • conradh@efn.org
        ... It s _The Workbench Book_ by Scott Landis. ISBN 0-918804-76-0 Great book, you can t possibly read it without picking up cool new ideas about holding
        Message 3 of 10 , Jul 15 1:39 PM
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          On Tue, July 14, 2009 6:55 pm, Alex Haugland wrote:


          >
          > If you go back through the discussions in the archive on holdfasts,
          > you'll find links to a few pictures and things on the net, and as far as
          > printed resources, either the book "The Workbench Book" or "The Workbench"
          > (I can't remember which off the top of my head),

          It's _The Workbench Book_ by Scott Landis. ISBN 0-918804-76-0 Great
          book, you can't possibly read it without picking up cool new ideas about
          holding your work. The period-relevant stuff isn't all in the
          introductory chapter, either--there's great stuff in Chapter 9 about
          making your own vises, including cutting the screw threads with basic hand
          tools. Chapter 12 is "Country Shaves and Brakes" and many of these
          workholders are also period-appropriate.


          contains an
          > introductory chapter talking a very brief history of workbenches with some
          > images, including one of a german 16th century workbench with a twin screw
          > front vise and a carriage vise.

          This one, from a 1505 drawing by an engineer named Loffelholz from
          Nuremberg, is your best bet if you want a documentable bench with close to
          modern levels of versatility. The tail (carriage) vise is enclosed in the
          bench top, and works against movable stops to accomidate different lengths
          of workpiece. The Landis book has instructions for homebuilding this sort
          of vise. (Note: Landis mentions that the homebuilt version he saw had to
          be turned in the opposite directions from a regular vise to open and
          close. This is because the maker used off-the-shelf iron hardware. If
          you want a truly period construction, just make a wooden thread by the
          methods shown elsewhere in the book, but make it left-handed. No more
          trouble than right-handed if you're handbuilding the threaded parts, and
          that way a clockwise turning of the vise handle will grip the work (as the
          carriage dog moves away from you down the bench)

          One other suggestion about the Loffelholz bench: this design represents
          the troubled infancy of the "modern" cabinetmaker's bench. The screws of
          the face vise don't run in and out when you turn a handle; they're fixed
          in the bench and the jaw tightens by means of big hand-operated wooden
          nuts on the outside of the jaw. Consider making some cuisses to protect
          your thighs, or trade some nice woodwork to your local armorer. Otherwise
          you'll get a lot of bruises and snags from the screws before you get used
          to the damn thing!

          Still, this bench has an extreme coolness factor, and I plan to build
          myself one someday. When I figure out where to put another bench, that
          is.

          Ulfhedinn
        • Electric Wolf
          It is completed!! :) I m rather proud of it despite its issues. I may go ahead and screw it completely in place and just use it as a permanent bench until I
          Message 4 of 10 , Feb 22, 2010
          It is completed!! :)
          I'm rather proud of it despite its issues. I may go ahead and screw
          it completely
          in place and just use it as a permanent bench until I get version two
          built with better
          wood and experience.

          --
          David "Wolf" Mc.
          Nullum beneficium inpune stat.
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