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New quest - RBG's for fencing melees

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  • bayard_turner
    Thanks for you help with my last request - on to the next one. I ve been asked to make a number of rubber band guns for fencing melees. I can handle the wood
    Message 1 of 5 , Jun 18, 2009
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      Thanks for you help with my last request - on to the next one. I've been asked to make a number of rubber band guns for fencing melees. I can handle the wood and the metal barrel, but I need help figuring out how the trigger/release mechanism functions. Has anyone seen plans?

      Thanks in advance.

      Bayard
    • mit1369
      I used to make quite a few of them once upon a time. My mechanism was only two moving parts. A trigger that when under strain holds back a cam with two spurs
      Message 2 of 5 , Jun 18, 2009
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        I used to make quite a few of them once upon a time.
        My mechanism was only two moving parts.

        A trigger that when under strain holds back a cam with two "spurs" or notches.
        One notch for the trigger and the other for the band.
        There are more refined pieces out there. But they work.

        Uadahlrich

        -----Original Message-----
        >From: bayard_turner <williams@...>
        >Sent: Jun 18, 2009 8:59 PM
        >To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
        >Subject: [MedievalSawdust] New quest - RBG's for fencing melees
        >
        >Thanks for you help with my last request - on to the next one. I've been asked to make a number of rubber band guns for fencing melees. I can handle the wood and the metal barrel, but I need help figuring out how the trigger/release mechanism functions. Has anyone seen plans?
        >
        >Thanks in advance.
        >
        >Bayard
        >


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      • conradh@efn.org
        ... Even simpler is the sort my dad made for me on occasion. One moving part. Essentially a stick that moves in a mortice through the body of the gun. He used
        Message 3 of 5 , Jun 19, 2009
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          On Thu, June 18, 2009 6:24 pm, mit1369 wrote:
          > I used to make quite a few of them once upon a time.
          > My mechanism was only two moving parts.
          >
          >
          > A trigger that when under strain holds back a cam with two "spurs" or
          > notches. One notch for the trigger and the other for the band.
          > There are more refined pieces out there. But they work.
          >
          >
          Even simpler is the sort my dad made for me on occasion. One moving part.

          Essentially a stick that moves in a mortice through the body of the gun.
          He used two pieces of plywood with spacer blocks; you could carve a more
          realistic looking period gun shape and chisel the mortice if you wanted.

          The stick's bottom end is carved into a trigger and sticks out the bottom
          of the mortice, where your finger can reach it easily. The upper end of
          the stick is carved into a prong that holds the rubber band, which
          stretches from there to the tip of the muzzle end.

          The stick is pivoted in the middle on a pin (can be a bolt or nail passing
          through the gun from side to side). Rig a spring (can be as simple as
          several rubber bands, or scrounge a small one out of something) so as to
          hold the trigger forward and thus the top prong back.

          Pull the trigger and the top prong pivots forward and disappears below the
          top line of the gun body, which pries the rubber band loose and off it
          goes.

          It helps if the stick is cut into a bit of a forward curve (make it out of
          a wider slat), if the pivot point is closer to the top than to the
          trigger, and if the prong is barely notched enough to hold the rubber
          band. Sand the top bit nice and smooth.

          Ghod--hadn't thought about one of those things for fifty years....

          Ulfhedinn
        • bayard_turner
          Thanks for your ideas. I m working on plans now, and if they work, I ll try to post them for use by others. Bayard
          Message 4 of 5 , Jun 20, 2009
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            Thanks for your ideas. I'm working on plans now, and if they work, I'll try to post them for use by others.

            Bayard

            --- In medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com, conradh@... wrote:
            >
            > On Thu, June 18, 2009 6:24 pm, mit1369 wrote:
            > > I used to make quite a few of them once upon a time.
            > > My mechanism was only two moving parts.
            > >
            > >
            > > A trigger that when under strain holds back a cam with two "spurs" or
            > > notches. One notch for the trigger and the other for the band.
            > > There are more refined pieces out there. But they work.
            > >
            > >
            > Even simpler is the sort my dad made for me on occasion. One moving part.
            >
            > Essentially a stick that moves in a mortice through the body of the gun.
            > He used two pieces of plywood with spacer blocks; you could carve a more
            > realistic looking period gun shape and chisel the mortice if you wanted.
            >
            > The stick's bottom end is carved into a trigger and sticks out the bottom
            > of the mortice, where your finger can reach it easily. The upper end of
            > the stick is carved into a prong that holds the rubber band, which
            > stretches from there to the tip of the muzzle end.
            >
            > The stick is pivoted in the middle on a pin (can be a bolt or nail passing
            > through the gun from side to side). Rig a spring (can be as simple as
            > several rubber bands, or scrounge a small one out of something) so as to
            > hold the trigger forward and thus the top prong back.
            >
            > Pull the trigger and the top prong pivots forward and disappears below the
            > top line of the gun body, which pries the rubber band loose and off it
            > goes.
            >
            > It helps if the stick is cut into a bit of a forward curve (make it out of
            > a wider slat), if the pivot point is closer to the top than to the
            > trigger, and if the prong is barely notched enough to hold the rubber
            > band. Sand the top bit nice and smooth.
            >
            > Ghod--hadn't thought about one of those things for fifty years....
            >
            > Ulfhedinn
            >
          • Baron Otto
            If you could check out the yahoo group http://groups.yahoo.com/group/SCA-Gunnes There, in the files section are several articles about band-gun construction.
            Message 5 of 5 , Jun 20, 2009
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              If you could check out the yahoo group http://groups.yahoo.com/group/SCA-Gunnes

              There, in the files section are several articles about band-gun construction.

               

              Otto

               

              From: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com [mailto:medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of bayard_turner
              Sent: Thursday, June 18, 2009 9:00 PM
              To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
              Subject: [MedievalSawdust] New quest - RBG's for fencing melees

               




              Thanks for you help with my last request - on to the next one. I've been asked to make a number of rubber band guns for fencing melees. I can handle the wood and the metal barrel, but I need help figuring out how the trigger/release mechanism functions. Has anyone seen plans?

              Thanks in advance.

              Bayard

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