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RE: [MedievalSawdust] Wood load strength

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  • Bill McNutt
    Generally, my response to the observation: Geeze, that looks flimsy has been 1) Use a denser wood. Oak, Hickory, and even walnut hold up better than pine
    Message 1 of 9 , Mar 1, 2009
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      Generally, my response to the observation: “Geeze, that looks flimsy” has been 1) Use a denser wood.  Oak, Hickory, and even walnut hold up better than pine and poplar.  2) Use MORE wood.  2” thick is stronger than 1” thick.  And, finally, 3, re-inenforce it with metal.

       

      All period solutions.  All add more weight.

       

      Will

       

      From: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com [mailto:medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of AlbionWood
      Sent: Sunday, March 01, 2009 6:39 PM
      To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: Re: [MedievalSawdust] Wood load strength

       

      "Period problems have period solutions!"  (quoting Duke Cariadoc)

      Don't futz around with laminating etc., just figure out how the same issue was treated by the people who made the chairs 500 years ago... some of which are still around today... guess they managed to solve this question!

      /rant

      Tim


      Conal O'hAirt Jim Hart wrote:

      There is an option that would do two things....

      allow you to use thinner stock making it less expensive
      and smaller pieces for less waste. ( which might allow
      you to use a more expensive and stronger wood.... )

      and

      allowing you to slightly change the orientation of the grain
      making it a little stronger.


      You could glue two pieces of 3/4" thick together to make 1 1/2"
      thickness..... ( might be a little hard to visualize and to explain )

      but you would still have the weak point at the center pivot....hmm....



       

      Baron Conal O'hAirt / Jim Hart

      Aude Aliquid Dignum
      ' Dare Something Worthy '

       

    • Dave Manley
      Here is a link to Chapter 4 - The Mechanical Properties of Wood from the Wood Handbook Posted by the US Forest Service Website.
      Message 2 of 9 , Mar 2, 2009
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        Here is a link to "Chapter 4 - The Mechanical Properties of Wood" from the Wood Handbook Posted by the US Forest Service Website. 


        this gives the Modulus of Elasticity and Rupture plus a work to maximum load ratio of many different types of wood.

        It may be more info than what you are looking for, but interesting reading for engineering types. :-D
         
        Dave Manley
        Et in Arcadia ego


      • Alex Haugland
        With the dantesca chair style, much of the strain on the joint can be alleviated by making sure that the legs make good, solid contact to both sides of the
        Message 3 of 9 , Mar 2, 2009
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          With the dantesca chair style, much of the strain on the joint can be alleviated by making sure that the legs make good, solid contact to both sides of the pivot joint, before the lap joint for the pivot.  That transfers much of the weight and downward force on the chair directly from the arms and seats to the legs without passing it through the pivot joint, which keeps the chair strong.

          --Alysaundre Weldon d'Ath
          Barony of Adiantum, An Tir

          Talmoor wrote:

          Does anyone have a good site or book for figuring the weight load a
          piece of wood can take? I am making a dantesca chair and wonder how
          much of a limit it can take and if there is any way to strengthen it.

          Alasdair


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