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Re: [MedievalSawdust] Table leg

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  • Conal O'hAirt Jim Hart
    An idea just came to me..... at least for a table top made up of separate planks.... It may not be documentable but it probably would work to hold the
    Message 1 of 24 , Jan 8, 2009
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      An idea just came to me..... at least for a table top made up
      of separate planks....

      It may not be documentable but it probably would work to
      hold the outermost planks in place... or all of them for that matter
      could be done this way....

      A pin with a shoulder that goes through the top into the
      cross bar to hold the two outermost planks in place...
      You would just drop it in then push it up from below to remove it

      Drawing link



       
      Baron Conal O'hAirt / Jim Hart

      Aude Aliquid Dignum
      ' Dare Something Worthy '



      From: AlbionWood <albionwood@...>
      To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Thursday, January 8, 2009 7:26:38 PM
      Subject: Re: [MedievalSawdust] Table leg

      Medieval trestle tabletops appear to have been very thick and heavy - the few surviving ones are, at least.  About 1.5 to 2 inches thick, oak, 2 or 3 feet wide... lot of gravity-induced stability.  Still I've always suspected some form of attachment to the trestles.  There's a 15th c. table in Bruges that has cleats on the underside to attach the top to the trestles, but it's also been modified several times, so I have no way to tell if those are original or not.  Don't know about the Penshurst table - anybody here gotten a look at the underside?

      German trestle tables from ca. 1500 often have dovetail cleats or sliding dovetails to attach the top to the trestles, but those are a different design (and arguably post-medieval) .

      Cheers,
      Tim

      Hall, Hayward wrote:

      Do you have much problem with the unattached top sliding about during use?  I suppose a heavy tablecloth would help keep things in place.

       

      Guillaume



    • Bill McNutt
      This is a problem for SCA trestle tables. Most of the period trestle tables I have examined have been massive, and the sheer weight of the two inch thick
      Message 2 of 24 , Jan 9, 2009
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        This is a problem for SCA trestle tables.  Most of the period trestle tables I have examined have been massive, and the sheer weight of the two inch thick table top prevented that.
         
        Will


        From: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com [mailto:medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Hall, Hayward
        Sent: Thursday, January 08, 2009 5:42 PM
        To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: RE: [MedievalSawdust] Table leg

        Do you have much problem with the unattached top sliding about during use?  I suppose a heavy tablecloth would help keep things in place.

        Guillaume

        From: medievalsawdust@ yahoogroups. com [mailto:medievalsaw dust@yahoogroups .com] On Behalf Of Conal O'hAirt Jim Hart
        Sent: Wednesday, January 07, 2009 9:48 PM
        To: medievalsawdust@ yahoogroups. com
        Subject: Re: [MedievalSawdust] Table leg

        I've never seen anythiung that could tell you how they were done

        I've never heard even a rumor of a surviving piece...

        I've done them like this....if for no other reason
        that it makes sense and it works...

        Picture I


        Picture II

        Baron Conal O'hAirt / Jim Hart

        Aude Aliquid Dignum
        ' Dare Something Worthy '

      • Wade Hutchison
        Here s one depiction of how the legs were joined to the stretcher. It s from a stained glass window at the Cloister s museum in NYC.
        Message 3 of 24 , Jan 9, 2009
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          Here's one depiction of how the legs were joined to the stretcher.
          It's from a stained glass window at the Cloister's museum in NYC.

          http://www.redoakleaf.net/Pics/monkeys.jpg

          I made a set of these that we've used at Pennsic for a couple of years
          now, and they work very well. The only difference is that I installed
          cleats on the underside of the table top to keep the top from sliding
          around. I make the mortises loose enough to knock down at the end of
          war for ease of transportation.

          Hope this helps.
          -----Gille MacDhnouill
          AEthelmearc.


          --- In medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com, "Jeff Johnson"
          <jljonsn9663@...> wrote:
          >
          > Trestle tables? There are a few depictions of them in period art of
          > the 14th & 15th century, but the problem is that I haven't seen any
          > that had a decent enough resolution of or show how they are joined at
          > the top or into the table top. Problem is: tablecloths! DAMNED
          > TABLECLOTHS!
          >
          > http://www.theluttrells.com/LuttrellsAtTable.html
          >
          > You'll see a few photos of conjectural reconstructions that some folks
          > have made. Some are basic joinery of 3 tapered legs mortised into a
          > horizontal board, some have webs between the front pair of legs, and
          > some are complex knock-down assemblies.
          >
          >
          >
          > --- In medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com, "George Irvin" <jmcdade@>
          > wrote:
          > >
          > > God morning everyone
          > > I was wondering if someone could point me to info on those Saw horse
          > type table legs arrangements( sorry not sure of thier proper name)
          > Anything will help.
          > > Thank you.
          > > Geo.
          > >
          >
        • Stan Hunter
          The best image I know of showing the construction of table trestles, with no nasty table-cloths, is attached. Sir Stanford
          Message 4 of 24 , Jan 9, 2009
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            The best image I know of showing the construction of table trestles, with no nasty table-cloths, is attached.
             
            Sir Stanford


          • Wolf
            Swe-e-e-e-t! Beautiful window, do you know anything about it? Where it is, when it was made, etc? (a request from SWMBO )
            Message 5 of 24 , Jan 9, 2009
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              Swe-e-e-e-t!

              Beautiful window, do you know anything about it? Where it is, when it
              was made, etc?

              (a request from SWMBO <g>)

              On Fri, 2009-01-09 at 22:25 -0500, Stan Hunter wrote:
              > The best image I know of showing the construction of table trestles,
              > with no nasty table-cloths, is attached.
              >
              > Sir Stanford
              >
            • Hall, Hayward
              Now all we need are plans for period monkeys. ________________________________
              Message 6 of 24 , Jan 9, 2009
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                Now all we need are plans for period monkeys.

                ________________________________


                On Fri, 2009-01-09 at 22:25 -0500, Stan Hunter wrote:
                > The best image I know of showing the construction of table trestles,
                > with no nasty table-cloths, is attached.
                >
                > Sir Stanford
                >
              • Jeff Johnson
                Why go all the way through the top? I ve played with pegs in the top of the legs and partway though the table top. You don t even need to make the holes in the
                Message 7 of 24 , Jan 12, 2009
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                  Why go all the way through the top? I've played with pegs in the top
                  of the legs and partway though the table top. You don't even need to
                  make the holes in the bottom of the top very precise - the objective
                  is to pevent the top from sliding more than a inch or two.




                  --- In medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com, Conal O'hAirt Jim Hart
                  <baronconal@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > An idea just came to me..... at least for a table top made up
                  > of separate planks....
                  >
                  > It may not be documentable but it probably would work to
                  > hold the outermost planks in place... or all of them for that matter
                  > could be done this way....
                  >
                  > A pin with a shoulder that goes through the top into the
                  > cross bar to hold the two outermost planks in place...
                  > You would just drop it in then push it up from below to remove it
                  >
                  > Drawing link
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > Baron Conal O'hAirt / Jim Hart
                  >
                  > Aude Aliquid Dignum
                  > ' Dare Something Worthy '
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > ________________________________
                  > From: AlbionWood <albionwood@...>
                  > To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
                  > Sent: Thursday, January 8, 2009 7:26:38 PM
                  > Subject: Re: [MedievalSawdust] Table leg
                  >
                  >
                  > Medieval trestle tabletops appear to have been very
                  > thick and heavy - the few surviving ones are, at least. About
                  > 1.5 to 2 inches thick, oak, 2 or 3 feet wide... lot of gravity-induced
                  > stability. Still I've always suspected some form of attachment to the
                  > trestles. There's a 15th c. table in Bruges that has cleats on the
                  > underside to attach the top to the trestles, but it's also been
                  > modified several times, so I have no way to tell if those are original
                  > or not. Don't know about the Penshurst table - anybody here gotten a
                  > look at the underside?
                  >
                  > German trestle tables from ca. 1500 often have dovetail cleats or
                  > sliding dovetails to attach the top to the trestles, but those are a
                  > different design (and arguably post-medieval) .
                  >
                  > Cheers,
                  > Tim
                  >
                  > Hall, Hayward wrote:
                  > Do
                  > you have much problem with the unattached top sliding about during
                  > use? I
                  > suppose a heavy tablecloth would help keep things in place.
                  >
                  > Guillaume
                  >
                • Jeff Johnson
                  But the surviving ones are mostly later and of afixed to the legs. (No finds of trestles coincides with no finds of trestle tops. :) ) Most of what you see in
                  Message 8 of 24 , Jan 12, 2009
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                    But the surviving ones are mostly later and of afixed to the legs. (No
                    finds of trestles coincides with no finds of trestle tops. :) ) Most
                    of what you see in illustrations seem pretty thin. I suspect it might
                    just be that the simple solution of gravity and friction held table
                    tops in place and that people then knew better than to lean against
                    tables.
                  • Jeff Johnson
                    Wow. I d seen that stained glass image in far less resolution before. I hadn t dreamed it d have that level of detail on the leg. THANK YOU!
                    Message 9 of 24 , Jan 12, 2009
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                      Wow. I'd seen that stained glass image in far less resolution before.
                      I hadn't dreamed it'd have that level of detail on the leg.

                      THANK YOU!

                      --- In medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com, Wolf <wolfeyes@...> wrote:
                      >
                      > Swe-e-e-e-t!
                      >
                      > Beautiful window, do you know anything about it? Where it is, when it
                      > was made, etc?
                      >
                      > (a request from SWMBO <g>)
                      >
                      > On Fri, 2009-01-09 at 22:25 -0500, Stan Hunter wrote:
                      > > The best image I know of showing the construction of table trestles,
                      > > with no nasty table-cloths, is attached.
                      > >
                      > > Sir Stanford
                      > >
                      >
                    • gunwaldt
                      Could someone post this in the files section for those of us who don t receive attachments? thanks, Gunwaldt ... with no nasty table-cloths, is attached.
                      Message 10 of 24 , Jan 13, 2009
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                        Could someone post this in the files section for those of us who don't
                        receive attachments?

                        thanks,
                        Gunwaldt

                        --- In medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com, "Stan Hunter" <sd_hunter@...>
                        wrote:
                        >
                        > The best image I know of showing the construction of table trestles,
                        with no nasty table-cloths, is attached.
                        >
                        > Sir Stanford
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                        >
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