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Re Tressel tables

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  • Hallie Ewanus
    Greetings all, They were not attached to the tops that was the whole point they wer put up and taken down as needed. living spaces were small, Even large halls
    Message 1 of 4 , Jan 8, 2009
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      Greetings all,
      They were not attached to the tops that was the whole point they wer
      put up and taken down as needed. living spaces were small, Even large
      halls were used for many things. the tables would be removed after
      dinner then the dancing could be held ,the hall was also used for
      sleeping the benches could be put together and sleep on. Single purpose
      rooms were rare and reserved for those of the very highest rank My
      degree was in history and I know more of it than I do of wood work!
      Hallie in south fl.
    • Conal O'hAirt Jim Hart
      seconded.... the only attachments I ve seen are the sliding dovetails at the top of the trestle legs but even that was a breakdown style joint that could be
      Message 2 of 4 , Jan 8, 2009
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        seconded.... the only attachments I've seen are the
        sliding dovetails at the top of the trestle legs
        but even that was a breakdown style joint that could
        be taken apart and stored out of the way to save
        space in the hall... Everything else I've seen was
        like a sawhorse with planks laid across them to
        make the tabletop.


         
        Baron Conal O'hAirt / Jim Hart

        Aude Aliquid Dignum
        ' Dare Something Worthy '



        From: Hallie Ewanus <hallieve@...>
        To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Thursday, January 8, 2009 8:37:28 AM
        Subject: [MedievalSawdust] Re Tressel tables



        Greetings all,
        They were not attached to the tops that was the whole point they wer
        put up and taken down as needed. living spaces were small, Even large
        halls were used for many things. the tables would be removed after
        dinner then the dancing could be held ,the hall was also used for
        sleeping the benches could be put together and sleep on. Single purpose
        rooms were rare and reserved for those of the very highest rank My
        degree was in history and I know more of it than I do of wood work!
        Hallie in south fl.


      • Jeff Johnson
        ... No dispute there! I ve been in a couple of real manor houses and castles, and the great hall isn t usually so much on the Great Big aspect. The
        Message 3 of 4 , Jan 8, 2009
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          --- In medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com, "Hallie Ewanus" <hallieve@...>
          wrote:
          >
          >
          >
          > Greetings all,
          > They were not attached to the tops that was the whole point they wer
          > put up and taken down as needed. living spaces were small, Even large

          No dispute there! I've been in a couple of real manor houses and
          castles, and the "great hall" isn't usually so much on the "Great Big"
          aspect.

          The question that plagues us folks that do play with making these
          critters is how the legs were put together and joined into the
          transverse pieces that the table tops rest on.

          I've made at least 4 different variations of trestle, based on what
          little artwork I've seen, including a couple of sliding dovetails. I
          really don't see any sliding dovetails before the late 15th C, and
          those seem to be from Northern Italy. Function-wise, I'm pretty sure
          that the sliding dovetails were more of a permanent component of a
          fixed top/cleat arrangement and the leg assemblies would have been
          detached from the cleat if it were to be broken down. Not much period
          evidence for it, aside from a disassembling French table in the Cluny,
          which has the top pegged to the legs, but it seems to make sense if
          you've played with how it all goes together.

          I really need to finish that article on trestle tables that I've got
          drafted...
        • leaking pen
          Yes please!
          Message 4 of 4 , Jan 8, 2009
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            Yes please!

            On Thu, Jan 8, 2009 at 3:03 PM, Jeff Johnson <jljonsn9663@...> wrote:
            > --- In medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com, "Hallie Ewanus" <hallieve@...>
            > wrote:
            >>
            >>
            >>
            >> Greetings all,
            >> They were not attached to the tops that was the whole point they wer
            >> put up and taken down as needed. living spaces were small, Even large
            >
            > No dispute there! I've been in a couple of real manor houses and
            > castles, and the "great hall" isn't usually so much on the "Great Big"
            > aspect.
            >
            > The question that plagues us folks that do play with making these
            > critters is how the legs were put together and joined into the
            > transverse pieces that the table tops rest on.
            >
            > I've made at least 4 different variations of trestle, based on what
            > little artwork I've seen, including a couple of sliding dovetails. I
            > really don't see any sliding dovetails before the late 15th C, and
            > those seem to be from Northern Italy. Function-wise, I'm pretty sure
            > that the sliding dovetails were more of a permanent component of a
            > fixed top/cleat arrangement and the leg assemblies would have been
            > detached from the cleat if it were to be broken down. Not much period
            > evidence for it, aside from a disassembling French table in the Cluny,
            > which has the top pegged to the legs, but it seems to make sense if
            > you've played with how it all goes together.
            >
            > I really need to finish that article on trestle tables that I've got
            > drafted...
            >
            >
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