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x-chair "Savonarola" working drawings

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  • Alan Waring #589
    Thanks to one and all for your help. I had visited and bookmarked each of the leads, et al,. When online plans & pics are combined of the x-folding chair, the
    Message 1 of 7 , Oct 7, 2003
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      Thanks to one and all for your help.

      I had visited and bookmarked each of the leads, et al,. When online
      plans & pics are combined of the x-folding chair, the element that
      most impressed me, was that fact that all the leg designs vary (not a
      little); the variations seem to be determined by the amount of wood
      one is willing to waste (1 x 3 1/4" to 1 x 5 1/2 rough), or the
      strength of the chosen wood, combined with the number of legs;

      the relative position of the arms and feet vary much(on some chairs,
      the arms sit on the same vertical plane, while others place the feet
      well inside);

      the pivot points likewise, are here, there, and everywhere,
      thus altering seat height and width. Also, the number of legs vary
      from 5 pair(cheapo repros) to 11 (early and a bit overbuilt). 8 & 9
      pair are the most common, on both early and
      reproductions/interpretations.

      I think I will have to draw plans from photos, something neew to me.

      Many thanks,
      Alan Waring
      Dale Guild Art Dept
      www.daleguild.com
    • James Winkler
      ... thus altering seat height and width. Also, the number of legs vary from 5 pair(cheapo repros) to 11 (early and a bit overbuilt). 8 & 9 pair are the most
      Message 2 of 7 , Oct 8, 2003
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        >> the pivot points likewise, are here, there, and everywhere,
        thus altering seat height and width. Also, the number of legs vary
        from 5 pair(cheapo repros) to 11 (early and a bit overbuilt). 8 & 9
        pair are the most common, on both early and
        reproductions/interpretations. <<
         
        Actually, the 'pivot points' are not as random as they might appear...  there's actually a structure underlying it all that is absolute and not tampered with lightly...
         
        All "X-chairs" or stools have pins in a very definite pattern:
         
         
        o     o     o
         
         
              o
         
         
        In the top row the left and right pins must be on the same plane as the center pin and are equally distant from the center pin.  The bottom pin sits somewhere along a line that is perpendicular to the row of pins that make the seat work.  The physical measurements will depend on the width of the seat and the angle at which the legs sit to the floor...
         
        Chas.

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