Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

Re: [MedievalSawdust] Boiled linseed oil

Expand Messages
  • leaking pen
    hence why i said ring out and fold open to dry. in such a condition you wont have such issues, its just piled up and wadded up, staying wet and getting
    Message 1 of 8 , Oct 27, 2008
      hence why i said ring out and fold open to dry. in such a condition
      you wont have such issues, its just piled up and wadded up, staying
      wet and getting warmer, that does it.

      On Mon, Oct 27, 2008 at 2:42 PM, <conradh@...> wrote:
      > On Tue, October 21, 2008 9:41 am, leaking pen wrote:
      >> Loose weave white muslin cloth in 1 foot by 6 in strips, folded over.
      >> apply oil to cloth, cloth to wood. You can reuse the cloth a few times,
      >> just wring it out and fold open to dry. when it gets saturated, it makes
      >> a great buffing cloth for after you apply the oil.
      >>
      >
      > WARNING!
      >
      > Please do _not_ save any rag with linseed oil on it, ever! It is the
      > single oil "most likely to succeed" in spontaneous combustion fires!
      > Innumerable shops and houses burned down from rags left by painters and
      > woodfinishers in the days when linseed oil was the base for most finishes,
      > and tradition-minded craftspeople can have very traditional housefires if
      > they don't follow the basic precautions.
      >
      > It's particularly bad if the rags are in a pile or folded/wadded up.
      > Safety-minded painters used to have cans of water on the job site, and
      > oily rags were stuffed in there until they could be disposed of. At my
      > shop, I use rags that are clean but that I don't care about (of which most
      > houses have plenty, if yours doesn't just ask three friends). I use the
      > rag to oil whatever needs it, then to go over any tool handles or other
      > wood that looks thirsty, and then the rag goes out onto the coal in my
      > forge, where it won't matter if it lights off. Or, this time of year,
      > straight into one of the woodstoves. A fireplace, barbeque, or any other
      > spot set up for fire is OK too.
      >
      > Please stay safe around linseed oil. It's the oil that gave "oily rags"
      > their bad reputation. It's a fine finish for wood, though--I usually use
      > it mixed with turpentine, and a trace of beeswax, but it's good just by
      > itself too.
      >
      > Ulfhedinn
      >
      >
    Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.