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Re: [MedievalSawdust] Tapering dowls and the tool to do so.

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  • Trevor Payne
    something like this? http://www.leevalley.com/wood/page.aspx?c=2&p=52401&cat=1,180,42288 or this?
    Message 1 of 8 , Oct 6, 2008
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      something like this?

      http://www.leevalley.com/wood/page.aspx?c=2&p=52401&cat=1,180,42288

      or this?

      http://www.leevalley.com/wood/page.aspx?c=2&p=57713&cat=1,180,42337&ap=1

      Aiden

      "Those who beat their swords into plowshares plow for those who didn't"
      --Benjamin Franklin--

      --- On Mon, 10/6/08, Alessandro dEste <avalonbear@...> wrote:
      From: Alessandro dEste <avalonbear@...>
      Subject: [MedievalSawdust] Tapering dowls and the tool to do so.
      To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
      Date: Monday, October 6, 2008, 11:38 AM

      Some were on the web I came across a tool that was used to taper dowl
      ends. And while hunting for more info on that tool I found a wooden
      hole tapering devise. The problem was the picture was so small that
      when enlarged I could not get a good view of how it was made. Im
      wanting to make this tool. From what I could see the person had used a
      tappered table leg and afixed a blade to it with a handle to twist by.
      I have seen them made of metal in one of Roy Underhill's books and wood
      ones also. but I just can't seem to find a photo clear enuff to see how
      its made. Can anyone help
      Sandro


    • Karl Christoffers
      Hello the list and greetings Alessandro,   Have you looked at John Alexander s Make a Chair from a Tree site?   http://www.greenwoodworking.com/reamer.htm
      Message 2 of 8 , Oct 6, 2008
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        Hello the list and greetings Alessandro,
         
        Have you looked at John Alexander's "Make a Chair from a Tree" site?
         
         
        I am making a variation on Alexander's design, where I forged out a reamer blade and am now making the stock to hold it. Alexander's method is easier.
         
        -Malcolm 

        --- On Mon, 10/6/08, Alessandro dEste <avalonbear@...> wrote:
        From: Alessandro dEste <avalonbear@...>
        Subject: [MedievalSawdust] Tapering dowls and the tool to do so.
        To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
        Date: Monday, October 6, 2008, 9:38 AM

        Some were on the web I came across a tool that was used to taper dowl
        ends. And while hunting for more info on that tool I found a wooden
        hole tapering devise. The problem was the picture was so small that
        when enlarged I could not get a good view of how it was made. Im
        wanting to make this tool. From what I could see the person had used a
        tappered table leg and afixed a blade to it with a handle to twist by.
        I have seen them made of metal in one of Roy Underhill's books and wood
        ones also. but I just can't seem to find a photo clear enuff to see how
        its made. Can anyone help
        Sandro


      • Bill Brown
        I saw in this ad for the spoon bits this part of the description and I do not understand it. Could someone decipher for me? But the most impressive feature of
        Message 3 of 8 , Oct 7, 2008
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          I saw in this ad for the spoon bits this part of the description and I do not understand it. Could someone decipher for me?

           

          “But the most impressive feature of this kind of bit is that, in a single operation, you can bore an accurately sized and positioned hole at an acute angle, lower than possible with any other kind of bit.”

          From this link: http://www.leevalley.com/wood/page.aspx?c=2&p=57713&cat=1,180,42337&ap=1

           

           

          Domingos

           

          From: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com [mailto:medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Trevor Payne
          Sent: Monday, October 06, 2008 11:54 AM
          To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: Re: [MedievalSawdust] Tapering dowls and the tool to do so.

           

          something like this?

          http://www.leevalley.com/wood/page.aspx?c=2&p=52401&cat=1,180,42288

          or this?



          Aiden

          "Those who beat their swords into plowshares plow for those who didn't"
          --Benjamin Franklin--

          --- On Mon, 10/6/08, Alessandro dEste <avalonbear@...> wrote:

          From: Alessandro dEste <avalonbear@...>
          Subject: [MedievalSawdust] Tapering dowls and the tool to do so.
          To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
          Date: Monday, October 6, 2008, 11:38 AM

          Some were on the web I came across a tool that was used to taper dowl
          ends. And while hunting for more info on that tool I found a wooden
          hole tapering devise. The problem was the picture was so small that
          when enlarged I could not get a good view of how it was made. Im
          wanting to make this tool. From what I could see the person had used a
          tappered table leg and afixed a blade to it with a handle to twist by.
          I have seen them made of metal in one of Roy Underhill's books and wood
          ones also. but I just can't seem to find a photo clear enuff to see how
          its made. Can anyone help
          Sandro

           

        • Rebekah d'Avignon
          Bill Brown wrote: I saw in this ad for the spoon bits this part of the description and I do not understand it. Could someone
          Message 4 of 8 , Oct 7, 2008
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            Bill Brown <stickbow@...> wrote:
            I saw in this ad for the spoon bits this part of the description and I do not understand it. Could someone decipher for me?
            “But the most impressive feature of this kind of bit is that, in a single operation, you can bore an accurately sized and positioned hole at an acute angle, lower than possible with any other kind of bit.”
            Domingos
            .

            = = = = =
            Not sure what you want deciphered, but......
            Chair legs are fequently fairly thin and must be bored for the stretchers. Using a standard bit with a screw-type brad point or a spade bit with a brad point (the points keep the bit in place until the hole is being bored) means that you run the risk of the point coming all the way through the leg - which is NOT what you want. The spoon bit makes a round-bottom hole for the stretcher without a lead for the brad point.
            The entire leading edge of the bit being sharpened means that you don't have to bore at 90 degrees - since chair legs are frequently splayed to give greater support, the stretcher can't intersect at right angles. It is possible to bore a hole at an angle with one of those other bits, but a spoon bit allows you to bore at a shaprer (more acute) angle.
             
            Is that helpful?


            RdA
            Tools alone do not a craftsman make.

          • Bill Brown
            I believe I do. I think I must get me a couple. Domingos From: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com [mailto:medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Rebekah
            Message 5 of 8 , Oct 7, 2008
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              I believe I do. I think I must get me a couple.

               

              Domingos

               

              From: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com [mailto:medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Rebekah d'Avignon
              Sent: Tuesday, October 07, 2008 8:12 AM
              To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
              Subject: RE: [MedievalSawdust] Tapering dowls and the tool to do so.

               



              Bill Brown <stickbow@...> wrote:

              I saw in this ad for the spoon bits this part of the description and I do not understand it. Could someone decipher for me?

              “But the most impressive feature of this kind of bit is that, in a single operation, you can bore an accurately sized and positioned hole at an acute angle, lower than possible with any other kind of bit.”

              Domingos

              .



              = = = = =

              Not sure what you want deciphered, but......

              Chair legs are fequently fairly thin and must be bored for the stretchers. Using a standard bit with a screw-type brad point or a spade bit with a brad point (the points keep the bit in place until the hole is being bored) means that you run the risk of the point coming all the way through the leg - which is NOT what you want. The spoon bit makes a round-bottom hole for the stretcher without a lead for the brad point.

              The entire leading edge of the bit being sharpened means that you don't have to bore at 90 degrees - since chair legs are frequently splayed to give greater support, the stretcher can't intersect at right angles. It is possible to bore a hole at an angle with one of those other bits, but a spoon bit allows you to bore at a shaprer (more acute) angle.

               

              Is that helpful?

               

              RdA

              Tools alone do not a craftsman make.

               

            • Alessandro dEste
              After seeing the web page I just saw what I want for christmas...
              Message 6 of 8 , Oct 7, 2008
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                After seeing the web page I just saw what I want for christmas...

                --- In medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com, "Bill Brown" <stickbow@...>
                wrote:
                >
                > I believe I do. I think I must get me a couple.
                >
                >
                >
                > Domingos
                >
                >
              • Alex Haugland
                To which you add the fact that they are a very period form of bit, unlike many other modernly available bit forms... --Alysaundre Weldon d Ath Barony of
                Message 7 of 8 , Oct 8, 2008
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                  To which you add the fact that they are a very period form of bit, unlike many other modernly available bit forms...

                  --Alysaundre Weldon d'Ath
                  Barony of Adiantum, An Tir

                  Bill Brown wrote:

                  I believe I do. I think I must get me a couple.

                   

                  Domingos

                   

                  From: medievalsawdust@ yahoogroups. com [mailto:medievalsaw dust@yahoogroups .com] On Behalf Of Rebekah d'Avignon
                  Sent: Tuesday, October 07, 2008 8:12 AM
                  To: medievalsawdust@ yahoogroups. com
                  Subject: RE: [MedievalSawdust] Tapering dowls and the tool to do so.

                   



                  Bill Brown <stickbow@mchsi. com> wrote:

                  I saw in this ad for the spoon bits this part of the description and I do not understand it. Could someone decipher for me?

                  “But the most impressive feature of this kind of bit is that, in a single operation, you can bore an accurately sized and positioned hole at an acute angle, lower than possible with any other kind of bit.”

                  Domingos

                  .



                  = = = = =

                  Not sure what you want deciphered, but......

                  Chair legs are fequently fairly thin and must be bored for the stretchers. Using a standard bit with a screw-type brad point or a spade bit with a brad point (the points keep the bit in place until the hole is being bored) means that you run the risk of the point coming all the way through the leg - which is NOT what you want. The spoon bit makes a round-bottom hole for the stretcher without a lead for the brad point.

                  The entire leading edge of the bit being sharpened means that you don't have to bore at 90 degrees - since chair legs are frequently splayed to give greater support, the stretcher can't intersect at right angles. It is possible to bore a hole at an angle with one of those other bits, but a spoon bit allows you to bore at a shaprer (more acute) angle.

                   

                  Is that helpful?

                   

                  RdA

                  Tools alone do not a craftsman make.

                   

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