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Re: enlarging a 1 1/4 inch hole

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  • Alessandro dEste
    ... Chas could you exsplain this. Sandro
    Message 1 of 26 , Oct 6, 2008
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      --- In medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com, James Winkler <jrwinkler@...>
      wrote:

      > D: do that "shave the spoke" thing... best option in my opinion
      > ...

      > Chas.
      >

      Chas could you exsplain this.
      Sandro
    • James Winkler
      ;-) The spoke shave thing I refered to was basically using a spoke shave to taper the ends of the dowels to fit the existing holes rather than enlarging
      Message 2 of 26 , Oct 6, 2008
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        ;-)    The “spoke shave thing” I refered to was basically using a spoke shave to taper the ends of the dowels to fit the existing holes rather than enlarging the holes…   (-:    Not exactly the desired form of solution… but a practical one none the less…

         

        Commercial tapered reamers *might* be useful… but most of them I’ve seen have a relatively sever taper…  my suggestion  for turning a taper was to make it gentle enough that, by working from both sides of the plank, you’d have minimal material in the center to remove  (running a taper in from both sides of the hole would create a bit of an “hourglass” effect on the hole.  

         

        Chas.

         

        ==================

        > D: do that "shave the spoke" thing... best option in my opinion
        > ...

        > Chas.
        >

        Chas could you exsplain this.
        Sandro

         

      • Bill Schongar (bschonga)
        Use a 1 drum sander chucked in a drill or a drill press. Or if you have some of the old pole, glue it into the old hole and then redrill. -Liam
        Message 3 of 26 , Oct 6, 2008
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          Use a 1" drum sander chucked in a drill or a drill press.
           
          Or if you have some of the "old" pole, glue it into the old hole and then redrill.
           
          -Liam
           
           
           


          From: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com [mailto:medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Conal O'hAirt Jim Hart
          Sent: Sunday, October 05, 2008 8:10 AM
          To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: Re: [MedievalSawdust] Re:enlarging a 1 1/4 inch hole

          as a practical problem....

          I could make them over.... Wouldn't be all that hard I just
          didn't want to waste the centers.

          Remember I did say 'easy' in the original question. There is
          a threshold for starting over. I'm just wondering if that point
          is where I think it is and was looking for other ideas. Something
          I may not have thought of.

          (  a detail I should have shared )
          I used a larger ( off the top of my head I do not recall the size )
          round-over router bit on the rim of the center hole already so
          there is not sharp edge to used to line up a router bit.

          I think I'm gonna plug the top of the hole and redrill with
          a new flat/spade bit ( I didn't have a 1 3/8" bit anyway so
          this was an excuse to buy a new one )


           
          Baron Conal O'hAirt / Jim Hart

          Aude Aliquid Dignum
          ' Dare Something Worthy '


          ----- Original Message ----
          From: julian wilson <smnco37@yahoo. co.uk>
          To: medievalsawdust@ yahoogroups. com
          Sent: Saturday, October 4, 2008 2:53:56 PM
          Subject: Re: [MedievalSawdust] Re:enlarging a 1 1/4 inch hole

          Um - my time is worth more to me than the cost of a replacement length of Dowelling.
          So, if it was me, as a professional woodworker, I'd either replace the staff dowelling, or make a new banner-base central workpiece.
          However, as a practical problem to solve - and given the equipment I have at my disposal , available in my workshop, - I think I'd set the workpiece up under my floor-standing- pillar-drill, - very carefully "centred" and well clamped in place, and - with the drill running at the kind of slow speed I use for drilling metal, - enlarge first section of the bore with a Forstner bit to the max depth of the bit-shank; - then change to a newly-sharpened flat-bit of the same size, but a long-shank, and finish the boring from the same end with that.
          Enlarging the first section of the bore with a Forstner bit will make lining-up the flat-bit for the second "pass" much easier.
          I certainly wouldn't try enlarging the bore with a hand-held power-tool.
          And the problem I see with trying to use a plunge-router  and a cutter with a bottom bearing is the depth available for the "plunge", plus the second-"set- up" to come at the undersized bore from the other end. Our questioner needed to go to a 5- or 6- inch total depth, IIRC.

          In service to the medieval Dream,
          Matthew Baker
          in the SCA
          [aka Julian Wilson, in 2008]


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